Zero to Three: A Crash Course

photo of woman and child playing with blocks
Overview

Zero to Three: A Crash Course
Covering Child Care and Early Learning in the Pandemic

The pandemic's massive disruption to K-12 and higher education is front and center for education journalists, but an equally important story for children, families, the education sector, and the workforce at large is the crisis in child care and early learning. 

The coronavirus has shut down or destabilized child care providers from coast to coast, some of which may never recover. It also has exacerbated the already deep-seated inequities in access, availability, cost and quality of child care and early learning in the nation.

On January 28, 2021, the Education Writers Association will hold an afternoon-long crash course on child care and early learning amid COVID-19. Experts, policymakers, researchers, and advocates will join EWA for this virtual event to take stock of the crisis from all angles—and discuss what's to come as President-elect Joe Biden takes office. The event will place special focus on issues impacting children from birth to age three, and will consider these issues as they relate to the political, economic, and social contexts of P-16 education. 

Journalists will have the opportunity to connect with sources in interactive sessions as they learn about key policies impacting families with young children. Reporters will also be able to meet informally with their colleagues to exchange story ideas, reporting tips, data know-how, and pandemic parenting woes.

This program is free and open to any EWA journalist member, supporting community member, or student member. If you're interested in this event but not an EWA member, you still have time to join. Membership for journalists and students is free.

This event is now closed for registration.

The pandemic’s massive disruption to K-12 and higher education is front and center for education journalists, but an equally important story for children, families, the education sector, and the workforce at large is the crisis in child care and early learning. 

The coronavirus has shut down or destabilized child care providers from coast to coast, some of which may never recover. It also has exacerbated the already deep-seated inequities in access, availability, cost and quality of child care and early learning in the nation.

On January 28, 2021, the Education Writers Association will hold an afternoon-long crash course on child care and early learning amid COVID-19. Experts, policymakers, researchers, and advocates will join EWA for this virtual event to take stock of the crisis from all angles—and discuss what’s to come as President-elect Joe Biden takes office. The event will place special focus on issues impacting children from birth to age three, and will consider these issues as they relate to the political, economic, and social contexts of P-16 education. 

Journalists will have the opportunity to connect with sources in interactive sessions as they learn about key policies impacting families with young children. Reporters will also be able to meet informally with their colleagues to exchange story ideas, reporting tips, data know-how, and pandemic parenting woes.

This program is free and open to any EWA journalist member, supporting community member, or student member. If you’re interested in this event but not an EWA member, you still have time to join. Membership for journalists and students is free.

This event is now closed for registration.

Blog: The Educated Reporter

4 Tips for Covering the Recovery of the Child Care Industry
Mindful approaches to reporting on early education and child care

The Biden administration’s ambitious plan to expand access to free universal preschool, increase the wages of child care providers to at least $15 an hour, and make child care more affordable for families sent ripples of optimism through the child care industry when unveiled this spring.

Tip Sheet

EWA Tip Sheet: How to Produce a Great Child Care/Early Ed Story

The coronavirus pandemic has created unprecedented interest in child care. Without child care, many parents cannot work. At the same time, providers are struggling to remain open. 

Those facilities that have powered through the pandemic are serving fewer children, have laid off staff and have encountered additional costs, such as cleaning supplies and PPEs. Many have closed, possibly permanently.

Blog: The Educated Reporter

Covering the Pandemic Child Care Crisis
Experts discuss how existing inequities have been exacerbated in the strained sector

America’s system of child care was already seriously strained by surging expenses, high staff turnover and dwindling capacity before the pandemic upended everything.

“COVID really just highlighted the pre-existing situations and challenges of the early childhood system across the nation,” said Dionne Dobbins, the senior director of research at Child Care Aware of America, a research and advocacy group. “When COVID hit, it was layering it on top of a very fragile child care system — and, you know, some would say it even shattered.”

Blog: The Educated Reporter

What’s on the Horizon for Early Childhood Education in 2021?
Local and national preschool efforts provide clues

Eight months into the pandemic, voters in Multnomah County, Oregon, approved a new tax on high earners to fund a program called Preschool For All. 

The action represents a major early childhood investment during a recession that threatens to drive many child care providers out of business. It also puts forth a compelling model for solving some of the problems that publicly funded preschool and child care programs in other states and cities haven’t fully addressed. 

What’s on the Horizon for Early Childhood Education in 2021?