A Reporter's Guide to Rethinking the American High School

Overview

A Reporter’s Guide to Rethinking the American High School
San Diego • High Tech High • December 4-5, 2017

High school is a critical phase in the journey to adulthood, but many students drop out or graduate ill-prepared to thrive in postsecondary education and the workforce. In response, momentum is building around efforts to reinvent the high school experience -- to make it more engaging, relevant, and academically challenging for young people.

Scattered across the country are examples of public schools -- both district-run and charter -- that are looking to buck the norms of the typical American high school. They are rethinking how, when, where, and at what pace students learn.

But the road to educational innovation is littered with potholes and early exit ramps. How can reporters make sense of the many emerging approaches that aim to upend traditional models? What questions should they ask to help cut through the buzzwords and flashy videos?

At this journalists-only seminar, on the campus of High Tech High in San Diego, reporters will explore these and other issues in high school redesign. They’ll hear from educators, analysts, students, and fellow journalists. They’ll witness, firsthand, examples of personalized and student-centered learning in action. Participating journalists will come away with a deeper context, new resources, and fresh story ideas to help cover this dimension of public schooling with an open mind and a healthy dose of skepticism.

Agenda

High school is a critical phase in the journey to adulthood, but many students drop out or graduate ill-prepared to thrive in postsecondary education and the workforce. In response, momentum is building around efforts to reinvent the high school experience — to make it more engaging, relevant, and academically challenging for young people.

Scattered across the country are examples of public schools — both district-run and charter — that are looking to buck the norms of the typical American high school. They are rethinking how, when, where, and at what pace students learn.

But the road to educational innovation is littered with potholes and early exit ramps. How can reporters make sense of the many emerging approaches that aim to upend traditional models? What questions should they ask to help cut through the buzzwords and flashy videos?

At this journalists-only seminar, on the campus of High Tech High in San Diego, reporters will explore these and other issues in high school redesign. They’ll hear from educators, analysts, students, and fellow journalists. They’ll witness, firsthand, examples of personalized and student-centered learning in action. Participating journalists will come away with a deeper context, new resources, and fresh story ideas to help cover this dimension of public schooling with an open mind and a healthy dose of skepticism.

Agenda

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