Media Commons Archive

EdMedia Commons Archive

Resource for homeschool scholarship

Hey folks. One of our faculty members at the Indiana University School of Education has just gone live with a website that you might find useful. It is all about homeschooling research, presented in a non-advocacy way. Details below. The direct web address is www.icher.org.

IU School of Education professor unveils new center and website for research on homeschooling
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Sept. 6, 2012

EdMedia Commons Archive

What does the slogan “education for all” means before you?

If you see the global structure of education and the current crises of terrorism across the globe we can easily notice that there is a huge difference of educational level between the continents. It is a very prominent cause of creating and cultivating a very special thought which eventually leads to a destructive vision to attain the rights and making your self noticed.  i think that education should come free for all at all levels.

EdMedia Commons Archive

“Voting With Their Feet”

An organization that analyzes real estate trends, Trulia, took a look at real estate and education. It compared the ratio of 5- to 9-year-olds to the number of preschool kids to come up with its numbers to see whether parents deliberately moved into higher-ranked school districts (judged by Great School ratings).

According to chief economist Jed Kolko:

EdMedia Commons Archive

Five Questions For … National School Boards Association’s Lucy Gettman, on Districts Entering Race To The Top


William Bushaw is co-director of the new Phi Delta Kappa/Gallup Poll on The Public’s Attitudes Toward the Public Schools. He spoke with EWA about the findings.

1. Individuals consistently rank their own neighborhood schools higher than schools nationally. Parents also overwhelmingly believe their child will graduate high school and find a good job. How should we view this level of optimism in the face of what seems to be strong indicators that the outlook isn’t as rosy?

EdMedia Commons Archive

New Phi Delta Kappa/Gallup Poll Finds Nation Divided On Education Issues

William Bushaw, co-director of the 2012 Phi Delta Kappa/Gallup Poll on the Public’s Attitudes Toward the Public Schools, will be answering questions throughout the day via EdMedia Commons. Please post your questions in the comments section of this discussion thread. For more on the poll, read EWA’s The Educated Reporter.

By Mikhail Zinshteyn, EWA

EdMedia Commons Archive

New California Poll Finds Voters Want More Ed Funding, Question Government’s Role

Professor Dominic Brewer, vice dean of the USC Rossier School of Education, will be answering questions throughout the day via EdMedia Commons. Please post your questions in the comments section of this discussion thread. The full poll results, methodology, and analysis are available below.

By Mikhail Zinshteyn, EWA

If California Gov. Jerry Brown is to be successful in convincing state voters to approve his package of tax increases to stave off additional budget cuts, he’ll have to try harder.

EdMedia Commons Archive

Five Questions For … National School Boards Association’s Lucy Gettman, on Districts Entering Race To The Top

The latest round of the Race To The Top grant program will allow school districts for the first time to apply directly for a share of $400 million in federal funds, rather than requiring the dollars to be funneled through state education departments. The application process is raising challenges – and questions – for many of the nation’s school districts, as they scramble to comply with the rigorous application requirements.

EdMedia Commons Archive

What Can Housing Policy Teach Us About the Costs of Higher Education?

Piggy-backing off Slate writer Matthew Yglesias’ ideas,  Joshua Kim—a professor director of Learning and Technology at Dartmouth—wrote at Inside Higher Ed that the merits of easing access to the most selective schools through blended-learning could have a cascade effect of bringing the cost of college down while challenging less-selective institutions to offer better academic services.

EdMedia Commons Archive

Eye of the Storm — A New Reporting Technique?

It’s a gripping tale already, the story of a undocumented college student who was arrested and sent to detention because she lacked a driver’s license. But the narrative was enhanced by a technique rarely seen in newsrooms, but frequently used in graphic novels. It augments the story well.

Is this a new chapter in narrative journalism? Can you see your news organization adding the resources to allow you to tell your stories this way?

EdMedia Commons Archive

Five Questions For … New America Foundation’s Lisa Guernsey, On the Pros and Cons of Gaming and Gadgets in the Classroom

EWA spoke with Lisa Guernsey, director of the New America Foundation’s early education initiative, and a former reporter for the New York Times and the Chronicle of Higher Education, about how schools are incorporating technology once thought best reserved for entertainment purposes into the classroom. (Click here to watch “Getting Schooled By a Third Grader,” a conversation with Guernsey, educators and technology experts.

EdMedia Commons Archive

First day of school coverage

Hey all,

As the first day of school aproaches, I am trying to brainstorm ideas for coverage. We will most likely do one wrap-up story of the whole day.

We thought about visiting different schools and doing little vignettes or finding one student to follow on his/her first day of high school todo a more profile type story.

Still thinking…

Any good ideas for fresh angles on first day of (k-12) school coverage?

Thanks,

Tracey

EdMedia Commons Archive

Five Questions For … Milken Educator Derek Vandegrift, On Teaching Civics and Student Engagement

In the new survey Fault Lines in Our Democracy, the ETS Center for Research on Human Capital and Education examined civic knowledge and engagement among U.S. students based in part on the National Assessment of Educational Progress, known as “The Nation’s Report Card.” EWA spoke with Derek Vandegrift, a history teacher at Waltham (Mass.) High School and a 2011 Milken Educator, about challenges facing civics educators, the impact of federal priorities, and the school’s role in developing citizenship.

EdMedia Commons Archive

Civil Rights Era Federal Ruling Blocks White Students From Leaving Failing School

A school in Louisiana that received a failing grade on the state’s performance index sent out letters to parents informing them their students can be transferred to better achieving schools nearby. However, the letter noted white students can’t leave: A 1968 federal case that was meant to enforce desegregation blocks white students from transferring out if it means the school becomes “all-Negro.” 

EdMedia Commons Archive

Five Reasons You Should (or Shouldn’t) Share Stories With Sources

EWA invited two veteran journalists to share their thoughts on whether reporters should offer to share drafts of stories with their sources before publication. Jay Mathews, seasoned education reporter with the Washington Post, has been a long-time proponent of story-sharing. Diane Rado, a veteran education reporter with the Chicago Tribune, is an adamant opponent. Both debated the topic on the EWA K-12 listserv this week.