Lumina 19-21

Overview Rick Wilson

Higher Education Seminar Fall 2019
University of Michigan • September 23-24, 2019

The Education Writers Association will hold its 2019 fall Higher Education Seminar September 23-24 on the theme of “Demographics, Politics, and Technology: The Forces Reshaping Higher Education.”

Held on the campus of the University of Michigan, this journalist-only intensive training event will offer two days of high-impact learning opportunities, including sessions on timely topics in higher education and practical advice for covering them effectively.

The Education Writers Association will hold its 2019 fall Higher Education Seminar September 23-24 on the theme of “Demographics, Politics, and Technology: The Forces Reshaping Higher Education.”

Held on the campus of the University of Michigan, this journalist-only intensive training event will offer two days of high-impact learning opportunities, including sessions on timely topics in higher education and practical advice for covering them effectively.

This year’s seminar will examine how higher education institutions are adjusting to new technologies, a reduction in the number of “traditional” college students, and a political environment marked by anti-intellectualism and polarization.

Confirmed activities include:

  • How to tell if your college is going broke 101 – Learn how to  find and analyze college budget data from Susan Menditto, director of accounting policy for the National Association of College and University Business Officers (NACUBO).
  • What are the student financial outcomes for each colleges’ department? Learn how to download and analyze new program level data from the federal College Scorecard’s Brian Fu.
  • Financial aid letter analysis training – Learn how to evaluate the clarity and honesty of a college’s communications with its financial aid recipients from Alejandra Acosta of New America. 
  • Fact-checking, transparency and “no surprises journalism – Learn how to rebuild trust with your readers and community – and, incidentally, get more clicks – by showing how you did your research.

Confirmed speakers include:

  • Michael Bastedo, a University of Michigan professor whose research was one of the inspirations for the College Board’s “adversity score” experiment.
  •  Susan Dynarski, a University of Michigan economist who spearheaded a successful experiment that increased the number of low-income students at the flagship school.
  • Scott Jaschik, editor of Inside Higher Ed, who will share his top 10 story ideas for higher education reporters.
  • John Katzman, founder of Princeton Review, 2U and Noodle Partners, who will discuss how technology is changing higher education
  • Josh Mitchell, a veteran Wall Street Journal reporter who is writing a book on student loans. 
  • Kim Hunter Reed, commissioner of higher education for Louisiana.
  • Tonio DeSorrento, founder of the nation’s largest designer of “Income Share Agreements.”
  • Michelle Weise, chief innovation officer, Strada Institute for the Future of Work, who will explain how changes in the job market are changing higher education.

If you are interested in a journalist scholarship that could cover part or all of your travel, lodging and registration fees, submit a Journalist Scholarship application first and wait for your scholarship decision email before registering for the event.

Apply For Scholarship

Space is limited, so reserve your seat as soon as possible!

Register to Attend

Webinar

How the ‘Public Charge’ Ruling Could Affect Students in Your Coverage Area

How the ‘Public Charge’ Ruling Could Affect Students in Your Coverage Area

The Trump administration’s new plan to make it harder for immigrants receiving public benefits to receive green cards could have sweeping implications for students and schools. 

The Education Writers Association presented this webinar to help reporters with story ideas and provide resources for covering the educational impact of the recently announced ”public charge” rule.

Key Coverage

Students Have an Uphill Battle to Degrees, But Montana Educators Push for Success

At Helena College, a 26-year-old student raising her daughter alone schedules class around her job at a grocery store. Stephanie Heitman’s paychecks were going toward unpaid medical bills until her small college helped with a grant.

When Tristin Bullshoe landed at the University of Montana after growing up in Browning, he struggled to pursue his dream of being a doctor. He landed in a college lecture hall with 300 people after graduating high school with a class of 12, and the Blackfeet student faced culture shock.

Blog: The Educated Reporter

Redrawing the Map for Student Success

When Baltimore City Public Schools placed current education data on a map of the city’s historic racial redlining, it was apparent that not much had changed, as district CEO Sonja Brookins Santelises tells the story. The segregated neighborhoods created in part by policies that barred predominantly black communities from federally subsidized mortgages were the same neighborhoods that today showed lower academic outcomes.

Santelises said those findings motivated her district to take a closer look at what kind of opportunities it provides students.

Agenda Kim Clark

Agenda for EWA’s 2019 Higher Education Seminar
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor - Sept. 22-24

 

This schedule is tentative and subject to change. The main conference runs from Monday, Sept. 23, to Tuesday, Sept. 24. We are also offering a special pre-conference public speaking training and movie screening on Sunday afternoon (Sep. 22).

 

Sunday, Sept. 22

Be a Master Moderator: Public Speaking Training for Journalists
3:00 – 5:00 p.m. (Space is limited. A separate application is required.)

Information

FAQs About the Fall 2019 EWA Reporting Fellowships

What is the EWA Reporting Fellowship?

The EWA Reporting Fellowship provides financial awards to education journalists to undertake special reporting and writing projects.

How many fellowships will be awarded?

EWA expects to award approximately six to eight fellowships in this round.

How much money comes with the fellowship?

EWA will provide awards of up to $8,000 apiece to winning proposals.

EWA Radio

Can a State Help More Residents Finish College?
With 75 percent of the state’s jobs requiring postsecondary credentials, Colorado looks to boost college and career training
(EWA Radio: Episode 213)

Like many states, Colorado has set an ambitious goal for boosting the number of citizens with advanced degrees and credentials, all with an eye toward filling high-need jobs in areas like health care and manufacturing. In a five-part series, EWA Reporting Fellow Stephanie Daniel of KUNC (Northern Colorado Community Radio) looks at how the Rocky Mountain state is trying to do that:

Tip Sheet

EWA Tip Sheet: Covering College Certificates and Microcredentials
Here are resources for understanding non-degree higher education alternatives.

Students and workers looking to quickly advance their careers are beginning to seek shorter and cheaper alternatives to traditional college degrees. And colleges, worried about a decline in the number of “traditional” freshmen, are creating alternative programs to attract new tuition-payers.

Blog: The Educated Reporter

Word on the Beat: Adversity Score
What reporters need to know about the College Board's experimental "Environmental Context Dashboard"

The question of which students should win admission to selective colleges is so heated that it has sparked state legislation, discrimination lawsuits and a celebrity-studded bribery scandal. So news that the College Board had been providing admissions officers data on the kind of “adversity” to which applicants had been exposed couldn’t help but stir controversy.

Key Coverage

Special Series: Offender Learning
The Oklahoman

At a time when Oklahoma — and the nation — continues to deal with overcrowded prisons and high rates of reoffending, higher education programs behind bars offer one of the most successful models at rehabilitation.

Through a fellowship with the Education Writers Association, The Oklahoman traveled to England to learn more about the nation’s prison education program at a time when Oklahoma’s high incarceration rate has most facilities over capacity and officials with the state Department of Corrections claiming new prisons are needed to handle the continued growth.