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Latest Education News

A collection of the most recent education journalism, curated by EWA staff. 

A collection of the most recent education journalism, curated by EWA staff. 

Member Stories

Feb. 15 – Feb. 21
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

As a teachers strike begins in Oakland, principals struggle with decision to cross picket line or not, reports Chalkbeat’s Sharon Noguchi.

For The Denver Post, Elizabeth Hernandez details the dramatic back-and-forth that helped end the city’s teachers strike.

The Houston Chronicle’s Jacob Carpenter explores how a new Texas law is creating tension between state and local school accountability systems.

Latest News

The Growing Gender Divide Among U.S. Teachers

Teaching in the United States was once considered a career for men. Then the profession’s gender composition shifted dramatically around the mid-19th century, when the country’s public-school system was born. As schoolhouse doors opened to children of all social classes and genders, so too did the education profession. By the late 1880s, women made up a majority—63 percent—of all the country’s teachers (though men continued to make up most of the high-school teaching force until the late 1970s).

Member Stories

Feb. 8 – Feb. 14
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

In South Florida, the first anniversary of the Parkland shooting led reporters’ coverage this week. WLRN’s Jessica Bakeman reports on a year of activism and grief for one survivor of the shooting.

Florida’s new Republican governor, Ron DeSantis, announced plans to have a grand jury investigate possible wrongdoing by Broward County schools, report Skyler Swisher, Scott Travis and Megan O’Matz for the South Florida Sun Sentinel.

Latest News

Historic Black Church Donates $100,000 To Pay Off Debts Of Howard U. Students

Alfred Street Baptist Church made a $100,000 gift  to Howard University that day, paying the debts of 34 students who owed sums ranging from $100 to more than $3,000.

Alfred Street had raised the money via a church-wide fast during the month of January, during which parishioners committed to doing without certain things, from not consuming sweets or alcohol to abstaining from social media. They were also asked to undertake a “financial fast,” and eliminate spending on non-essential items.

Key Coverage

3 States Tried to Shutter Failing For-Profit Online Charter Schools. A Suspicious Pattern of Allegations, Accusations, and Legal Complaints Quickly Followed
The 74

On their face, the allegations describe public officials being bought — and for a pittance. Drinks in a hotel lobby. Airfare reimbursement for a meeting. A $4,000 “personal payment” appearing just before a mid-level functionary inks a government contract for the consultant offering the so-called perks.

Indeed, the legal complaints filed in South Carolina, Georgia, and Nevada have resulted in a string of juicy headlines. And later, though ostensibly unrelated, in the resignations of two of the state employees named.

Latest News

In This California Classroom, Students Teach Each Other Their Home Languages — And Learn Acceptance

In Acacia WoodsChan’s ethnic studies class at Castlemont High School in Oakland, California, students chat with each other in Spanish, Arabic and Mam, a Mayan language from Guatemala. The students have only been in the US for a few weeks or months. Some are from Yemen, and many are from countries in Central America — Guatemala, El Salvador and Honduras.

Latest News

Giving Students More Music, Theater, and Dance Boosts Writing Scores (and Compassion), Big New Study Finds

When you’re the big fish, it’s not OK to pick on the little fish just because you can.

That’s an important lesson for everyone. But some Houston first-graders got a particularly vivid demonstration in the form of a musical puppet show, which featured fish puppets and an underlying message about why it’s wrong to bully others.

Latest News

More Immigrants Students in Baltimore County Schools

Baltimore County’s school system is absorbing a wave of immigrants that has fueled rising enrollments the past few years, adding thousands of students who teachers say are enriching their schools but also stretching the system to find additional seats and new ways to teach them.

Latest News

‘They Failed My Son,’ Chicago Public Schools to Pay $4 Million in Special Ed. Teen’s Drowning at School Pool

Someone was at the bottom of the pool at Kennedy High School, not moving. At least three students told that to the Chicago Public Schools lifeguard on duty.

But the lifeguard ignored them, according to records obtained by the Chicago Sun-Times and the Better Government Association that CPS officials released but then went to court in a failed effort to keep them secret.

Latest News

Nc Miscalculated Rate Of Teachers Who Failed Math Exam

For more than five months, North Carolina’s education leaders have been agonizing over a math test that has posed a barrier for hundreds of elementary school teachers trying to get their license and keep their jobs.

This week state officials announced that, well … their own calculations may have been flawed.

But they said Wednesday the hullabaloo over high failure rates on the Pearson exams has led them to new insights and better questions about how to keep incompetent teachers out of classrooms without deterring good ones.

Latest News

Why Are International Students Turning Their Back On American Colleges?

Evidence is mounting that the U.S. is becoming a less attractive place for international students to study.

The latest sign: A report published Thursday by the Council of Graduate Schools, which found that applications from international students to U.S. graduate schools dropped 4% between fall 2017 and fall 2018, the second year in a row of declines. First-time graduate student enrollment is also down 1% for the second year in a row.

Member Stories

Feb. 1 – Feb. 7
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

With Denver teachers poised to strike, Chalkbeat’s Melanie Asmar analyzes the role of the district’s pay-for-performance teacher compensation system.

In Pennsylvania, a grand jury released a report detailing favoritism, mismanagement, and poor leadership in a now financially insolvent school district, reports Matt McKinney for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

Latest News

Fewer AP Classes, More Suspensions: Being Black in Suburban Schools

Even in generally high-performing suburban school districts, students of color, particularly black students, face pervasive prejudice when it comes to access to advanced coursework, academic achievement and discipline. Figures from the most recent federal Civil Rights Data Collection show disparities in every part of the country. 

Latest News

A School Board Says No to Big Oil, and Alarms Sound in Business-Friendly Louisiana

It was a squabble over $2.9 million in property-tax breaks — small change for Exxon Mobil, a company that measures its earnings by the billions.

But when the East Baton Rouge Parish school board rejected the energy giant’s rather routine request last month, the “no” vote went off like a bomb in a state where obeisance to the oil, gas and chemical industries is the norm.

Latest News

Could Congress Pass a New Higher-Education Law Before 2020?

Sen. Lamar Alexander, a Republican of Tennessee, confirmed on Monday that he hopes to get the Higher Education Act reauthorized within the next year. Doing so could cement his legacy as a bipartisan dealmaker as chairman of the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions.

Latest News

Cleaner Classrooms and Rising Scores: With Tighter Oversight, Head Start Shows Gains

When federal officials inspected this city’s Head Start program five years ago, they found moldy classrooms, exposed wires, leaking sewage, a sagging roof and trash-strewn playgrounds littered with safety hazards. A teacher had jerked a student so hard she dislocated the girl’s shoulder.

The visitors were so alarmed at the neglect that they began changing diapers themselves. What they did next was even more unusual: They fired the nonprofit running the program, the Urban League, and chose a new one.

Latest News

Can Data Make You a Better Teacher?

Terri L. Renner had long wondered what made some of her students succeed more than others.

Maybe, thought Renner, a senior lecturer in the School of Public and Environmental Affairs at Indiana University at Bloomington, it was a question of preparation. Because her course in health-care finance involves accounting, she expected that students who previously took classes in that subject would do well in hers — but a quick review showed no clear correlation. So what, exactly, did prepare students best for rigorous quantitative courses?

Latest News

Weakest Students More Likely to Take Online College Classes but do Worse in Them

Online college classes and degrees give working adults a lot of flexibility in furthering their educations but there’s a big policy debate over whether students are learning much. According to the most recent federal statistics from 2016, roughly one out of every three or 6.3 million college students learned online. That number is growing even as fewer people are going to college. About half of them were enrolled in online degree programs and take all of their classes on the internet.

Latest News

What Bennett College’s Pledge Drive Foreshadows for Black Colleges

Bennett College needed to collect $5 million to survive. The historically black women’s college in Greensboro, North Carolina, was appealing a decision to revoke its accreditation—based largely on its feeble financial situation—and wanted to show that it could raise funds. The school gave itself 50 days to prove its case.

Latest News

Pioneering Spirit: How One School Helps Latino Students Tackle AP Tests

Ivan Rangel weaves among more than 30 desks in his small classroom as he lectures about Confucianism to his high-level Advanced Placement world history class. The ancient Chinese philosopher valued lifelong learning, says Mr. Rangel, and saw education as the only way to “transform the people.” It is self-cultivation that brings success. Nurture not nature.

Latest News

Pell Grants for Prisoners Could Save Illinois Millions

Illinois could save millions of dollars on incarceration costs if the federal ban on Pell Grants for inmates was lifted, according to a new report from the Vera Institute of Justice. Pell Grants are awarded to low-income undergraduate students to help them pay for college. The report, called “Investing in Futures: Fiscal Benefits of Postsecondary Education in Prison,” cites numerous economic and other benefits to states across the country if prisoners were able to apply for and receive federal Pell Grants.

Latest News

Sexual Assault, Harassment Up Nearly 50 Percent At Military Academies

Incidents of sexual assault at U.S. military academies spiked nearly 50 percent during the last school year despite years of focus on the issue and declarations of zero-tolerance, according to results of a survey conducted by the Pentagon.

The number of students reporting unwanted sexual contact totaled 747 during the 2017-18 academic year compared with 507 in 2015-16, according to anonymous surveys of cadets and midshipmen. Unwanted sexual contact ranges from groping to rape.

Member Stories

Jan. 25 – Jan. 31
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

For The Hechinger Report, Matt Krupnick examines how a cultural divide between farmers and educators is contributing to a widening skills gap in rural communities.

As fallout from the shooting at Stoneman Douglas High School continues, Florida’s new governor is exploring what action he can take against Broward County school board members, report Susannah Bryan, Scott Travis, and Skyler Swisher of the South Florida Sun Sentinel.

Latest News

Freshman Applications Dip At University of California For The First Time In 15 Years. Is It The Start Of A Trend?

For the first time in 15 years, the number of would-be freshmen applying to the University of California has dropped, the first sign that a national trend of declining college enrollment could be hitting the West Coast.

Applications for the coming school year dipped by 3% to 176,530, according to preliminary UC data released Tuesday. The drop could be a temporary blip, experts said. Among the system’s nine undergraduate campuses, only three — UCLA, UC Berkeley and UC Santa Cruz — saw declines in freshman applications.

Latest News

What Does Higher Ed Have to Say About the Proposed Title IX Rules?

The Education Department’s proposed regulations on Title IX, the federal gender-equity law, would provide colleges with some long-sought flexibility when responding to sexual-misconduct reports — but would make campus disciplinary proceedings far too legalistic and burdensome.

That’s according to the public comments, compiled in a 33-page letter, submitted to the Department of Education on Wednesday by the American Council on Education, higher education’s biggest lobbying arm. Sixty other associations signed onto the letter.

Latest News

D.C. Charter Administrators Have Some of the Highest School Salaries in Town; Their Teachers, Some of the Lowest

Liz Koenig has been working in D.C. charter schools for seven years, and at the same charter for the last five. She used to be a lawyer. “My first-year salary as a teaching assistant was less than my year-end bonus as an attorney, which blew my mind,” she recalls. When Koenig took her current teaching job, she didn’t know anything about her charter’s salary schedule, other than what she had been offered to start.

Latest News

In 13 Years of Education Reporting, So Much Has Changed

I first met Alex Caputo-Pearl, the strike-leading president of the Los Angeles teachers’ union, in 2011, when I shadowed him for a day at Crenshaw High School. I was working on a book about the history of public school teaching, and Mr. Caputo-Pearl, then a social studies teacher, had a fascinating personal story.

He had served in the very first class of Teach for America recruits, in 1990, and was part of a small group of original T.F.A. members who were, 20 years later, still working in urban public school classrooms.

Latest News

Trump’s Past State of the Union Pitches and Schools: A Scorecard

President Donald Trump was originally scheduled to give his State of the Union address (or #SOTU for social media fans) Tuesday night. But Rep. Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., the Speaker of the House, told him he needed to wait until an end to the government shutdown, citing security concerns. The shutdown is over, for now. Congressional negotiators will spend the next three weeks trying to reach a deal on border security. And on Monday, Pelosi invited Trump to deliver his address on Feb. 5. 

Key Coverage

Only Two Percent Of Teachers Are Black Men, Yet Research Confirms They Matter

 A growing body of recent research asserts that a black man in the classroom is both rare and critically needed in American public schools.

Since 2014, ethnic and racial minorities make up more than half of the student population in U.S. public schools, yet about 80 percent of teachers are white and 77 percent of them are female. People of color make up about 20 percent of teachers; a mere 2 percent are black men.

Member Stories

Jan. 18 – Jan. 24
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

In Parkland, Fla., administrators have denied a job to the mother of a victim of the 2018 school shootings. For the South Florida Sun Sentinel, Scott Travis examines the politics behind the move.

Thousands of black children attend schools named after segregationist politicians, writes Education Week’s Andrew Ujifusa.

Key Coverage

From Prison To College: How A Formerly Incarcerated Student Overcame The Odds To Graduate

Like many people coming out of prison, Perry Cline never thought he’d get a college degree.

Cline, a 51-year-old black man and Chicago native, just graduated from college. He has a bachelor’s degree in social work. He also co-founded a non-profit to help those battling addiction, and he recently landed a job as a case manager at a substance abuse treatment facility in Champaign, Illinois.

Latest News

Indiana Superintendent Faces Insurance Fraud For Sick Student’s Care

A superintendent of an Indiana school district faces fraud charges for using her insurance to obtain $233 in medical care for a sick student.

Elwood Community Schools Superintendent Casey Smitherman was charged with three felonies and a misdemeanor in an insurance fraud case after she allegedly used her son’s insurance to get treatment for a sick student.

Key Coverage

North Carolina’s Teacher Diversity Gap

In North Carolina, where minority students make up 52 percent of the traditional public school body, 80 percent of teachers are white. For students of color, especially black and Hispanic boys, that means they may seldom – or never – have a teacher who looks like them during their kindergarten through 12th grade years.

Member Stories

Jan. 11 – Jan. 17
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

Talk of teacher strikes was a big education news story this week. In Los Angeles, administrators are trying desperately to keep schools open as more than 30,000 educators remain on the picket lines, reports Linda Jacobson for Education Dive.

Elsewhere in California, time is running out for the Oakland teachers union and school district officials to reach a deal to avoid a strike, writes Theresa Harrington for EdSource.

Key Coverage

An Epidemic of Untapped Potential

Over the past year, the Globe has tracked down 93 of the 113 valedictorians who appeared in the paper’s first three “Faces of Excellence” features from 2005 to 2007. We wanted to know, more than a decade later, how the stories of Boston’s best and brightest were turning out.

Key Coverage

When You Give a Teacher a Gun

The question is no longer “should we arm teachers?” Now, it’s “how many armed teachers are already out there?” GQ flew down to Ohio to embed with the men and women behind FASTER Saves Lives, a group that has trained thousands of teachers from all across the country how to shoot to kill.

Member Stories

Jan. 4 – Jan. 10
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

In The Chronicle of Higher Education, Michael Vasquez asks: Has Duke University really turned a corner on the issue of sexual assault?

With the government shutdown in its third week, the chairman of the Senate education committee proposes a way out, reports Education Week’s Andrew Ujifusa.

For The New York Times, Eliza Shapiro examines the growing popularity of Afrocentric schools.

Key Coverage

Why Illinois Won’t ‘Ban The Box’ On College Applications

Next year, the Common Application used by hundreds of colleges and universities will stop asking potential students about their criminal histories. Despite legislative efforts in Illinois, most campuses in the state continue to ask the question. Nationwide, roughly two-thirds of colleges and universities that completed a 2009 survey reported asking prospective students about their criminal histories.

Key Coverage

Far From Home: Different Stories, With Common Threads

On a bulletin board at Skidmore College in Saratoga Springs, New York, a flier advertised a storytelling event for first-generation students to share their experience in their own words.

The event was part of a larger project headed by Senior Associate Dean of Students Luis Inoa. Inoa spent the summer working with a first-gen Skidmore student to research the best practices in first-gen student support at liberal arts colleges around the country. He discovered that storytelling, in particular, is very powerful.