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Latest Education News

A collection of the most recent education journalism, curated by EWA staff. 

A collection of the most recent education journalism, curated by EWA staff. 

Latest News

Prairie View A&M Plans New Center For Race And Justice Following George Floyd’s Death

Fears and questions about students’ future have kept Prairie View A&M University President Ruth Simmons awake during the recent tumultuous days, since longtime Houstonian George Floyd died in police custody in Minneapolis.

His death has brought a murder charge against the arresting police officer and aiding-and-abeting charge against three others, and prompted eight straight days of protests across the country, including a massive march with as many as 60,000 people in downtown Houston Tuesday.

Latest News

George Floyd Protest: How Kids Can Process Racism With Schools Closed

In times of great political and social upheaval, schools often serve as a protected space outside the home for students to wrestle with difficult concepts, guided by an educated professional. But those conversations are hard to have right now. To start, there’s a pandemic, and school buildings are closed. It’s also the end of the academic term. Not to mention the ongoing hurdle: Many teachers are uncomfortable talking about race and racism, especially racism against black Americans.

Latest News

Portland Superintendent Says He’s ‘Discontinuing’ Presence Of Armed Police Officers In Schools

Portland Public Schools will no longer have city police officers patrol the halls of its nine high schools.

Superintendent Guadalupe Guerrero on Thursday announced that the state’s largest school district is “discontinuing the regular presence of school resource officers,” saying he intends to invest in more social workers, counselors and culturally specific supports for students.

Latest News

Chicago Educators Reach Out To Students About Racism, Police Brutality

Across Chicago, teachers seized on a moment that felt familiar: helping students cope with trauma and express feelings and thoughts amid national outrage over the killing of a black man by a white police officer. After the death of Chicago teenager Laquan McDonald in 2014, and the murder trial of Chicago officer Jason Van Dyke, the city encouraged teachers to help students process rage, sadness, and confusion but to “stay neutral.”

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (May 29-June 4)
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week:

Kristen Graham of The Philadelphia Inquirer shares her experience of being detained by police for walking to her car past curfew despite having a press exemption.

The financial crisis wrought by COVID-19 has left schools with big budget cuts and spoiled dreams of expanded funding and teacher pay raises, reports Jeff Amy of The Associated Press.

Latest News

Are You Ready For Socially Distant School? How 1 N.J. District Is Planning To Reopen.

It’s the first day of school in Mount Olive Township, and masked students wait in line for their initial test: a mandatory temperature screening.

Those who pass are allowed to enter the building and follow designated one-way hallways to their classrooms, possibly a gymnasium or an auditorium to maintain strict social distancing requirements.

Latest News

Penn. Department Of Education Issues Guidance For Reopening Schools

The Pennsylvania Department of Education said Wednesday that elementary and secondary schools in the yellow or green reopening phase can resume in-person instruction and activities beginning July 1.

The schools must first develop health and safety plans based on guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the state Department of Health, officials said.

Read and watch the full story here. 

Latest News

Gordon Parks Showed America the Rage Behind Decades of Racial Unrest. On Thursday, Minneapolis Rioters Burned the School Named for Him

On the third night of the anarchy that is reducing my city to cinders, someone started a fire at Gordon Parks High School. It was one of hundreds of fires that have accompanied protests over the killing of a black man by Minneapolis police officers. The school fire did not make national headlines — no surprise, given that the main event the night that building was torched was the burning of the police department’s Third Precinct and several beloved and historic surrounding blocks.

Latest News

Breonna Taylor Protest: Kentucky High School Teacher of the Year Arrested

The 2020 Kentucky High School Teacher of the Year was arrested this weekend protesting the death of Breonna Taylor in downtown Louisville.

Matt Kaufmann, who teaches in Jefferson County Public Schools, was booked Sunday night on an unspecified misdemeanor charge, according to the Department of Corrections booking log.

Read the full story here.

Latest News

After George Floyd’s Killing, What Academics Can Do

Here we go again. Pain. Fear. Suffocation. Death. Rage. Grief. I’m supposed to be an optimist. As an academic and now a college president, I’ve lived all of my adult life in hope for the future. I have steadfastly believed that if we do our jobs right, the world will be a better place. This generation, and the next, and the next, will be smarter, better, kinder, humbler, more careful of the world and of each other.

Then comes 525 seconds. A lifetime. George Floyd’s life, snuffed out.

Latest News

Spurred by Coronavirus, Some Colleges Rush to Move Online

Like campuses across the country, the University of Colorado system is running short on time and money to prepare for the academic year. Now, faculty and staff trying to adjust to changes wrought by the coronavirus have something new to put on their agendas for the fall.

Latest News

Why So Few Students Transferring from Community College yo University

Students are often advised to start college at a public community college as a way to save thousands of dollars on a bachelor’s degree. According to the most recent federal data in 2017-18, the average tuition and fees at a community college was $3,200, which compares favorably with $9,000 at a public four-year school. When they first arrive, about 80 percent of community college students say they want to earn a bachelor’s degree. 

Latest News

CPS Suspends Food Distribution Program ‘Based on The Evolving Nature of Activity’ in Chicago

Thousands of families will now have to look for another way to feed their kids after Chicago Public Schools suspended its meal distribution program “based on the evolving nature of activity across the city,” officials announced late Sunday night.

The district, the nation’s third largest, has given out more than 12.5 million meals since the start of the coronavirus pandemic through a food program that has been widely praised by parents who rely on schools as a primary food source. Of CPS’ 355,000 students, 271,000 come from low-income families and about 17,000 are homeless.

Latest News

Minneapolis School Board, Teacher Union Call on District to Cut Ties With Police

The Minneapolis Public School Board on Friday wrote a resolution to cut ties with the city’s Police Department in the wake of the killing of George Floyd.

The district’s current budget puts over $1 million toward funding 11 school resource officers in the district’s buildings. School Board Chair Kim Ellison said she wants to end that contract because she can no longer trust the city police department’s values.

Latest News

After George Floyd Killing, Denver School Board Member Wants Police Out Of Schools

The morning after heated protests erupted in Denver over the police killing of George Floyd, school district leaders pledged to “stand up for justice,” and one school board member renewed his call to remove police officers from the district’s schools.

Denver Public Schools Superintendent Susana Cordova and three of the district’s seven school board members made a statement Friday on Facebook Live about the killing in Minneapolis.

Latest News

A Brand New COVID-Era College In Vermont?

Seth Andrew, who founded a network of more than 20 charter schools spread across the country, has been on a strange sort of mission over the past couple of years: to purchase a bucolic yet dying New England college campus and repurpose it as a new sort of educational institution.

After fleeting flirtations with Green Mountain College and Southern Vermont College, which both closed last year, Andrew met his match in the economically troubled Marlboro College in Vermont, which is expected to merge with Boston’s Emerson College later this year.

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (May 22-28)
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week:

Sarah Garland of The Hechinger Report shares her experience of assuming the role of her child’s teacher to highlight the many challenges that parents are facing during remote learning.

For The Press of Atlantic City, Claire Lowe tells the story of four childhood friends who followed through on an eighth-grade pact to all get their college degrees in a four-year period.

Latest News

Where Indiana Students Lack Home Internet, Computer

More than 100,000 children in Indiana don’t have a computer or a computer with internet access at home, according to an analysis of federal data.

An analysis of federal data by WFYI News and SAVI, a public data program at The Polis Center at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, offers a look at who among Indiana’s 1.7 million children are impacted by lack of access.

Latest News

Washington’s Constitution Protects K-12 Funding. The Coronavirus Will Test That Promise.

The fate of Andy Kidd’s teaching job was almost decided by a high-stakes card draw.

It was 2008, and budget cuts were imminent. With the country headed into terrible financial straits, school districts around Washington decided to lay off teachers in order to weather the storm.

One day, administrators summoned Kidd to Shoreline district headquarters. He and another Shorecrest High School teacher each drew from a deck of cards. A peculiar set of union seniority rules dictated what happened next: the person with the higher card, he said, would be spared.

Latest News

Michigan State Students To Return To Campus In Fall, University President Says

Michigan State University students are heading back to campus in the fall amid COVID-19, President Samuel Stanley announced Wednesday.  “At this point, we believe that a values-driven return is possible and can be done in a way that mitigates the risks to our community,” Stanley wrote in a letter to the campus community.

Classes will begin Sept. 2 and will include in-person and online components. In-person instruction will end Nov. 25, before Thanksgiving, with the remainder of the semester conducted virtually. 

Latest News

How The Science Of Vaccination Is Taught (Or Not) In U.S. Schools

When Rebecca Brewer started teaching high school biology 20 years ago, it seemed like everyone trusted science. Teaching topics like the science of vaccinations elicited little controversy. But in the past few years, she’s seen a shift. Now, every year, she reliably has a few students who push back against the topic.  “Their parents’ opinions make their way into the classroom,” said Brewer, who teaches in Troy, Michigan. “Of course, some students will bring up the idea they’ve heard that there’s a connection between vaccinations and autism.”

Latest News

‘I’m On Edge All Day Long.’ Schoolwork A Mere Afterthought For Homeless Youth

On a recent weekend, Destiny, 17, spent an unusually sunny spring day canoeing near her temporary home in Western Washington. Technically homeless, Destiny has been staying with her grandmother. She went to sleep that night on the living room couch with a slight ache in her throat.

She woke with a start the next morning, drenched in sweat, with a fever over 100, her throat nearly completely closed. Lacking a car to get to a nearby clinic, her grandmother dialed 911 for an ambulance. Paramedics quickly arrived, wearing face masks and shields and full-body hazmat suits.

Latest News

Takeaways From Research On Tutoring To Address Coronavirus Learning Loss

any educators and policymakers are worried about low-income children falling woefully behind in math, reading and other subjects while schools are closed during the coronavirus pandemic. One proposal is to give them personal tutors. Normally, the idea of giving every poor child a professional tutor would seem too expensive but extreme circumstances have put big ideas on the table and policymakers are suggesting cheaper, if not exactly cheap, ways to do it.

Latest News

Teens Are Working As Essential Workers While Going to High School

Sanaia is just one of many teenagers who are working “essential” jobs during the COVID-19 pandemic. While the federal government has advisory guidelines for which jobs are deemed essential during this pandemic, the particulars vary on a state-by-state basis. Although there don’t appear to be official figures for exactly how many essential workers there are right now, various news reports say that number is in the millions.

Read the full story here.

Latest News

Coronavirus, Schools Reopening: 1 in 5 Teachers May Not Return

In an exclusive USA TODAY/Ipsos poll, 1 in 5 teachers say they are unlikely to go back to school if their classrooms reopen in the fall, a potential massive wave of resignations. While most teachers report working more than usual, nearly two-thirds say they haven’t been able to properly do their jobs in an educational system upended by the coronavirus. 

Read the full story here.

Latest News

Summer Jobs and Internships for Teens Are Scarce, Forcing Them to Get Creative

Now millions of American high school and college students have arrived at the Summer of Nothing, a landscape of scuttled internships, summer camps and travel plans that might have been résumé gilders — or at least something to do. A summer in which paid jobs are scarcer than a Stanford admission and require something almost as tough to obtain: parental permission.

Latest News

Coronavirus Is Creating A Financial Crisis For American Schools

Austin Beutner looked haggard, his face a curtain of worry lines. The superintendent of the second-largest school district in the nation sat at a desk last week delivering a video address to Los Angeles families. But he began with a stark message clearly meant for another audience:

Lawmakers in Sacramento and Washington, D.C.

Read the full story here.

Latest News

This Harvard Sophomore Created a Free Tutoring Service For Low-income NYC Students

After Harvard sent students home due to the coronavirus, Ilana Cohen returned to her Park Slope home and turned her attention to her younger sister, whose Brooklyn public high school was now operating remotely as well.

The college sophomore noticed that her sister could easily access Google Classroom assignments, but had little live instruction, or the individual support and interaction that comes with it.

Latest News

In Montgomery County, Schools And Parents Clash Over How Much Teachers And Students Are Connecting

When the coronavirus pandemic closed schools in Maryland, Brian Krantz expected that his children’s classes would move online, with a thoughtful plan and at least some live instruction.

It didn’t go as he imagined.

The first sound of a teacher’s voice leading a lesson, he said, came about six weeks into the school closures. Even now, he said, his 12-year-old daughter’s teachers mostly post assignments and recorded materials, leaving virtual office hours as the main time for questions or any live interaction with them.

Latest News

What’s Going To Happen At Colleges This Fall? Here Are 15 Scenarios

It’s difficult to imagine higher education facing a more intense set of challenges than what we are seeing because of the COVID-19 pandemic. These challenges will likely be felt for years to come, but fall 2020 will test many of the standards and structures that we have come to associate with higher education.

Latest News

Reopening Schools On 1 June Will Be Logistical Nightmare, Say Teachers

Teachers have warned that the UK government’s push to reopen primary schools in England on 1 June will be a logistical nightmare.

Under the plans, schools have been told to prepare to resume reception, year 1 and year 6 classes, as well as any early years education they provide. But a growing number of councils have said they will not comply, and Welsh and Scottish schools will not reopen until later.

Latest News

For In-Person College, Coronavirus Testing Will Be Key. But Is That Feasible?

The coronavirus test wasn’t as bad as Celeste Torres imagined. Standing outside a dorm at the University of California, San Diego, Torres stuck a swab up a nostril, scanned a QR code, and went on with the day.

“The process itself was about five minutes,” Torres says, “I did cry a little bit just because it’s, I guess, a natural reaction.”

Latest News

Too Expensive to Re-Open Schools? Some Superintendents Say It Is

Kathy Granger has a difficult puzzle to solve. As superintendent of the Mountain Empire Unified School District in southeastern San Diego County, she’s forging ahead with plans to re-open school buildings this fall, with a staggering and expensive mix of new health and safety precautions because of COVID-19.

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (May 15-21)
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week:

Minnesota students show off the prom finery they would have worn in photos taken by Star Tribune’s Leila Navidi and share their stories with Rachel Hutton.

Mississippi Today’s Kelsey Davis Betz examines how the coronavirus pandemic has led to plummeting FAFSA completion rates in Mississippi.

Kaylee Tornay of the Mail Tribune gathers the highs and lows of distance learning for five Oregon teachers.

Latest News

Education Software: Educators Are Forced To Figure Out Which Ones Works

School closures in all 50 states have sent educators and parents alike scrambling to find online learning resources to keep kids busy and productive at home. Website traffic to the homepage for IXL, a popular tool that lets students practice skills across five subjects through online quizzes, spiked in March. Same for Matific, which gives students math practice tailored to their skill level, and Edgenuity, which develops online courses.

Latest News

Why Did The CARES Act Give More Money To Hair Schools Than To A Community College?

After $14 billion was set aside for higher education in the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act, Houston Community College and the Paul Mitchell Schools both got financial relief.

The Houston college, a public institution with nearly 60,000 students, received $28.3 million. The for-profit hair and cosmetology schools received $30.5 million, despite serving only 20,000 students.

The CARES Act money was meant to help low-income students and the schools that serve them.

Latest News

UNC System Makes Plans For Students To Be On Campus This Fall

Some UNC System schools plan to finish the fall semester before Thanksgiving, another won’t start the semester until after Labor Day and others are still deciding exactly what to do as the system develops a “detailed contingency plan” and guidance for welcoming students back to campuses

Interim UNC System President Bill Roper said the question he gets asked most frequently is how universities will operate during the fall 2020 semester.

Latest News

UNC System Makes Plans For Students To Be On Campus This Fall

Some UNC System schools plan to finish the fall semester before Thanksgiving, another won’t start the semester until after Labor Day and others are still deciding exactly what to do as the system develops a “detailed contingency plan” and guidance for welcoming students back to campuses

Interim UNC System President Bill Roper said the question he gets asked most frequently is how universities will operate during the fall 2020 semester.

Latest News

Schools Must Keep Serving English Learners During Pandemic, Federal Ed Officials Say

Schools that have switched to remote learning can’t give up on language services for their students learning English, the federal education department reminded school districts this week.

New guidance, published Monday by the U.S. Department of Education, answers questions facing schools serving the nation’s some 5 million English learners during the coronavirus pandemic, which has closed schools across the country.