Latest News

Overview Rick Wilson

Latest Education News

A collection of the most recent education journalism, curated by EWA staff. 

A collection of the most recent education journalism, curated by EWA staff. 

Latest News Allison Kowalski

A Sharp Rise of Latinx In Higher Education— But Support For Them Is Lagging

At IU Northwest in 2017, Latinx students like Perez had a six-year graduation rate of just 28 percent, while the graduation rate for white students was 35 percent. Those numbers reflect a nationwide gap: Latinx are half as likely as non-Hispanic whites to hold a bachelor’s degree, and the gulf has widened since the early 2000s.

Latest News

Districts Struggle to Hire Black Teachers. Is the Solution Hiring More Black Principals?

School districts across the country struggle to hire staff that reflect changing student demographics. But could the answer to that ongoing problem lie in developing a strategy to hire more principals of color? 

A working paper by Jason Grissom, an associate professor of public policy and education at Vanderbilt University, and Brendan Bartanen, a doctoral student at the university, strongly suggests yes.

Member Stories

May 24 – May 30
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

In an investigation for the Connecticut Mirror and ProPublica, Jacqueline Rabe Thomas examines how some of the state’s richest towns fight to maintain housing segregation, and the implications for schools.

A Texas school district’s sex education curriculum could be in jeopardy as the state looks to limit business with Planned Parenthood, reports Melissa Taboada for the Austin American-Statesman.

Key Coverage

Lost Days: Poverty, Isolation Drive Students Away From School In California’s Rural Districts

Twenty-six percent, or about 600 students, at Oroville Union High School District were chronically absent during the 2017-18 school year, according to an EdSource analysis of California Department of Education data.

Statewide, more than 700,000 students, or about 11 percent, were chronically absent. About 10 percent of the 1,000 districts statewide had rates near the level of Oroville Union High’s or significantly higher. Most of those districts were in rural areas, the analysis found:

Latest News

Underpaid, Undertrained, Unlicensed: In Palm Beach County’s Largest Charter School Chain, 1 In 5 Teachers Weren’t Certified To Teach

Renaissance Charter Schools grew into Palm Beach County’s largest charter school chain with seven years of promises about cutting-edge classrooms and innovative teaching.

But as the schools market themselves to parents with personalized lessons and extended school days, their classrooms are staffed with an extraordinary number of temporary and uncertified teachers, a Palm Beach Post investigation found.

Latest News

Colleges Challenge a Common Protection in Sexual Assault Lawsuits: Anonymity

For years, students have filed sexual assault complaints under pseudonyms, which allow them to seek justice without shame or fear of being targeted. Universities have generally accepted the practice.

But in two recent lawsuits — a case against Florida A&M University and a suit by nine women against Dartmouth College — the schools have demanded that students publicly reveal their identities, going against longstanding legal practice intended to protect plaintiffs in sensitive disputes.

Member Stories

May 17 – May 23
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

For Houston Public Media, Laura Isensee tells the story of one teenager’s slow struggle to rebuild her life after a school shooter nearly took it from her.

The nation’s student loan forgiveness program for public servants is a disaster, writes Kimberly Hefling for Politico.

In a growing number of cities, taxpayers are choosing to foot the bill for high-quality public pre-K, writes Brenda Iasevoli for The Hechinger Report.

Latest News

Louisville Students Lack Proof Of Vaccination, Risking A Measles Outbreak

Thousands of Jefferson County students went to classes this year without their schools ever knowing if they were vaccinated against measles or other highly contagious diseases.

A Courier Journal analysis of vaccination reports found that more than 4,300 students attending Jefferson County Public Schools had no record as of March that they received their shots for measles, mumps and rubella.

That’s despite a state law requiring students to hand in those records within two weeks of enrollment. 

Latest News

Aide Hit Autistic Pupil In Past But Allowed Back Into Classroom

A teacher’s aide recently caught on secret recordings berating autistic children at a Pembroke Pines elementary school has gotten in trouble before for her treatment of a student.

Five years ago, Joyce Latricia Bradley, was accused of striking and bruising a 10-year-old autistic boy with a marker after he misbehaved in class. Months after her arrest for misdemeanor battery in September 2014, Broward prosecutors dropped the case, acknowledging something many South Florida parents don’t realize.

Latest News

Can Pay Raises Help Rural Texas Districts Like Buffalo Retain Teachers?

If you’re not from Buffalo, Texas, you probably won’t end up there.

That’s how Greg Kennedy sees it from his vantage point as junior high principal in a building that used to be his high school and was his uncle’s high school before that. Once bustling with eager oil field workers, the sparsely populated town halfway between Houston and Dallas counts Buffalo Independent School District as one of its main employers.

Latest News

Many More Students, Especially the Affluent, Get Extra Time to Take the SAT

At Scarsdale High School north of New York City, one in five students is eligible for extra time or another accommodation such as a separate room for taking the SAT or ACT college entrance exam.

At Weston High School in Connecticut, it is one in four. At Newton North High School outside Boston, it’s one in three.

Key Coverage

More High-School Students Are Using This Hack to Get a Head-Start on College — but the Poorest Students Are Being Left Behind

“That was wild.”

That’s how Victor Orduna describes his life as a teenager in southwest Chicago’s Gage Park neighborhood. And he isn’t talking about partying with friends or other high-school high-jinks.

Orduna is referring to his schedule. The now 19-year old would wake up around 6:30 a.m., head to his high school until the late afternoon, and then clock in for his job at a local supermarket, where he’d bag groceries until 10:30 p.m. Some weekends, Orduna worked the late shift at a pizzeria, slinging pizzas and cooking burgers until 1:30 a.m.

Key Coverage

Inside the Nationwide Effort to Tackle the $1.5 Trillion Student-Debt Crisis — With the Help of High-School Students

There’s not much Barack Obama and Betsy DeVos see eye-to-eye on.

But the 44th president of the United States and the Trump administration’s controversial education secretary have found some common ground.

Obama and DeVos — as well as many local, state and federal politicians — have heralded the idea of students taking college courses and earning college credits while still in high school.

Latest News

Adenovirus at the University of Maryland: Officials Waited 18 Days to Inform Students of the Threat

It had been six days since Olivia Shea Paregol walked out of the University of Maryland health center without an answer for why she felt so awful.

Now, the 18-year-old freshman was curled up in the fetal position on the floor of her dorm room at Elkton Hall in College Park, her brown hair resting on the shaggy white rug. She warned her friends, Sarah Hauk and Riley Whelan, to stay away from a plastic bag where she had just vomited.

Latest News

Many School Districts Hesitate to Say Students Have Dyslexia. That Can Lead to Problems.

Nearly half of the students in Montgomery County Public Schools underperformed on reading exams last year.

Sarah and Jay Friedman’s daughter was among them. But unlike many of the other 78,000 underperforming students, Friedman’s daughter wasn’t just missing benchmarks on tests — she had severe dyslexia that had gone undiagnosed for years.

Key Coverage

Deserted in the Desert

Thousands of records examined by the Las Vegas Review-Journal show a yearslong history of abuse and neglect allegations at Northwest Academy, a private boarding school for at-risk youth.

Member Stories

May 3 – May 16
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

In the months before the shooting at STEM School Highlands Ranch, some parents raised concerns about bullying and inadequate security, reports Jenny Brundin for Colorado Public Radio.

The two school shootings in as many weeks have prompted officials to discuss the risk of students confronting active shooters, writes Tawnell Hobbs for The Wall Street Journal.

Key Coverage

DeVos Might Not Serve as Ed. Secretary If Trump Re-elected

Betsy DeVos hinted Monday that should President Donald Trump get re-elected in 2020 that she might not serve as education secretary during his second term.

“I’m not sure my husband would be OK with that,” said DeVos of her husband, Dick DeVos, a former Michigan gubernatorial candidate, after hesitating before delivering her response.

Member Stories

April 26 – May 2
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

Leaky roofs. Corroded pipes. Faulty fire alarm systems. Detroit’s school buildings are broken, but the district lacks the resources to fix them, reports Jennifer Chambers for The Detroit News.

Continuing the wave of teacher activism that began last year, Oregon educators are poised to walk out of their classrooms next week, writes Natalie Pate for the Statesman Journal in Salem.

Member Stories

April 19 – April 25
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

In a three-part series for KNKX, Ashley Gross examines how Washington state’s graduation rates exclude many students who are most at risk of dropping out.

As Colorado considers a bill to encourage more students to take advanced courses, Colorado Public Radio’s Jenny Brundin finds that many students and schools aren’t waiting for official action.

Key Coverage

A Search For Answers, A Search For Blame

Max Eden didn’t even want to read about Parkland. He saw the news on Valentine’s Day, after a dinner date with his girlfriend at a little French place in Washington, D.C., taking an Uber home. There was the gut-punch—“oh shit, another school shooting”—then the queasy afterthought that none of this hits as hard as it used to. He knew what would follow. For a few angry weeks, Democrats would demand gun control and Republicans would call for arming teachers. He decided he’d sit it out this time, ignore the news as much as possible.

Member Stories

April 12 – April 18
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

A new report shows wealthy school districts are increasingly splitting from poorer, more racially diverse ones, reports Emmanuel Felton for The Hechinger Report.

The lack of diversity on one North Texas school district’s board is the subject of a voting rights lawsuit filed this week, reports Eva-Marie Ayala for The Dallas Morning News.

Member Stories

April 5 – April 11
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

A series of stories this week from education reporters describe the challenges some places face in attracting and keeping teachers. For USA Today, Erin Richards explains how soaring housing prices are fueling a chronic teacher shortage in Hawaii.

In Colorado, officials are trying a novel strategy to attract teachers to rural communities. Colorado Public Radio’s Jenny Brundin reports on the “rural immersion” program.

Member Stories

Mar. 29 – April 4
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

For Education Week, Madeline Will examines how a lack of paid parental leave forces many teachers to return to the classroom before they’re ready.

As the scandal grows concerning the lucrative children’s book deal by Baltimore’s mayor, Liz Bowie and Talia Richman of The Baltimore Sun ask: “Where did all the books go?”

Member Stories

Mar. 22 – Mar. 28
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

A Connecticut school district’s decision to hire security guards while laying off mental health professionals has sparked a debate about school safety, reports Brian Zahn for the New Haven Register.

Meanwhile, an Indiana elementary school received national attention after teachers there were shot with plastic pellets as part of an active-shooter drill, reports Arika Herron for the Indianapolis Star.

Member Stories

Mar. 15 – Mar. 21
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

For Oregon Public Broadcasting, Rob Manning examines schools’ use of seclusion and restraint for students with disabilities.

As Tennessee considers a private school voucher program, Chalkbeat’s Laura Faith Kebede explores how a history of racism and distrust could affect families’ willingness to participate.

Member Stories

Mar. 8 – Mar. 14
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

What happened when a charter school in Tennessee replaced in-school suspensions with something called a reflection room? Chalkbeat’s Caroline Bauman examines one effort to rethink discipline.

For The Chronicle of Higher Education, Michael Vasquez explains how a major chain of for-profit colleges “came crashing down” this month.

Member Stories

Mar. 1 – Mar. 7
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

In what some are calling “The Trump Effect,” an increasing number of students are considering H.B.C.U.s and single-sex colleges, reports Alina Tugend of The New York Times.

As New York City seeks to diversify its prestigious high schools, some see an opportunity to challenge affirmative action before the U.S. Supreme Court, writes Mark Keierleber for The 74.

Member Stories

Feb. 22 – Feb. 28
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

Chalkbeat’s Christina Veiga reports on how the deteriorating conditions of New York City’s public housing buildings are affecting the child care centers nestled within them.

Despite an injection of nearly $1 billion into Washington’s public school system, a majority of the state’s districts are projecting budget shortfalls, reports Neal Morton and Dahlia Bazzaz for The Seattle Times.

Report

(Report) Nonwhite School Districts Get $23 Billion Less Than White Districts Despite Serving the Same Number of Students

The story of our communities can in many ways be told through the lens of the school districts that serve our children. More than organizations that enable learning, school districts are geographic boundaries that serve as magnifying lenses that allow us to focus on issues of race and wealth. They are both a statement of “what is” and “what could be” in our society.

Member Stories

Feb. 15 – Feb. 21
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

As a teachers strike begins in Oakland, principals struggle with decision to cross picket line or not, reports Chalkbeat’s Sharon Noguchi.

For The Denver Post, Elizabeth Hernandez details the dramatic back-and-forth that helped end the city’s teachers strike.

The Houston Chronicle’s Jacob Carpenter explores how a new Texas law is creating tension between state and local school accountability systems.

Key Coverage

3 States Tried to Shutter Failing For-Profit Online Charter Schools. A Suspicious Pattern of Allegations, Accusations, and Legal Complaints Quickly Followed
The 74

On their face, the allegations describe public officials being bought — and for a pittance. Drinks in a hotel lobby. Airfare reimbursement for a meeting. A $4,000 “personal payment” appearing just before a mid-level functionary inks a government contract for the consultant offering the so-called perks.

Indeed, the legal complaints filed in South Carolina, Georgia, and Nevada have resulted in a string of juicy headlines. And later, though ostensibly unrelated, in the resignations of two of the state employees named.

Key Coverage

Only Two Percent Of Teachers Are Black Men, Yet Research Confirms They Matter

 A growing body of recent research asserts that a black man in the classroom is both rare and critically needed in American public schools.

Since 2014, ethnic and racial minorities make up more than half of the student population in U.S. public schools, yet about 80 percent of teachers are white and 77 percent of them are female. People of color make up about 20 percent of teachers; a mere 2 percent are black men.

Key Coverage

From Prison To College: How A Formerly Incarcerated Student Overcame The Odds To Graduate

Like many people coming out of prison, Perry Cline never thought he’d get a college degree.

Cline, a 51-year-old black man and Chicago native, just graduated from college. He has a bachelor’s degree in social work. He also co-founded a non-profit to help those battling addiction, and he recently landed a job as a case manager at a substance abuse treatment facility in Champaign, Illinois.

Key Coverage

North Carolina’s Teacher Diversity Gap

In North Carolina, where minority students make up 52 percent of the traditional public school body, 80 percent of teachers are white. For students of color, especially black and Hispanic boys, that means they may seldom – or never – have a teacher who looks like them during their kindergarten through 12th grade years.

Key Coverage

An Epidemic of Untapped Potential

Over the past year, the Globe has tracked down 93 of the 113 valedictorians who appeared in the paper’s first three “Faces of Excellence” features from 2005 to 2007. We wanted to know, more than a decade later, how the stories of Boston’s best and brightest were turning out.

Key Coverage

When You Give a Teacher a Gun

The question is no longer “should we arm teachers?” Now, it’s “how many armed teachers are already out there?” GQ flew down to Ohio to embed with the men and women behind FASTER Saves Lives, a group that has trained thousands of teachers from all across the country how to shoot to kill.

Key Coverage

Why Illinois Won’t ‘Ban The Box’ On College Applications

Next year, the Common Application used by hundreds of colleges and universities will stop asking potential students about their criminal histories. Despite legislative efforts in Illinois, most campuses in the state continue to ask the question. Nationwide, roughly two-thirds of colleges and universities that completed a 2009 survey reported asking prospective students about their criminal histories.

Key Coverage

Far From Home: Different Stories, With Common Threads

On a bulletin board at Skidmore College in Saratoga Springs, New York, a flier advertised a storytelling event for first-generation students to share their experience in their own words.

The event was part of a larger project headed by Senior Associate Dean of Students Luis Inoa. Inoa spent the summer working with a first-gen Skidmore student to research the best practices in first-gen student support at liberal arts colleges around the country. He discovered that storytelling, in particular, is very powerful.

Key Coverage

District Sends Teachers on Home Visits to Help Get More Students to College

West Virginia unveiled a campaign this year for 60 percent of adults ages 25 to 64 to have earned a degree or certificate by 2030. But in this county of fewer than 19,000 residents, just 38 percent of recent high school graduates sought more education, according to the latest available data from the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission. That’s well below the statewide rate of 55 percent. And in 2016 just 8 percent of McDowell County residents of working age held an associate degree or higher, compared to 31 percent statewide.

Key Coverage

Far From Home: Demystifying the College Experience

On a sunny Saturday in October, about 500 prospective students and their families gathered on the campus of the University of Texas at El Paso for Orange and Blue Day. They met with representatives from financial aid, admissions, and various academic departments in a festival-like atmosphere spread across campus.

The university uses events like this to make college more inviting for families sending their first-ever student to college.

Key Coverage

Rally Had Minor Impact on Admissions as UVa Addresses Financial Needs and Its Own History

The University of Virginia can seem like a textbook college campus: white columns and porticos, long lawns and statues of Thomas Jefferson and Homer.

In 2017, though, UVa’s Rotunda steps were transformed into a maelstrom as white supremacists carried torches and attacked protesters. For months, the school was roiled by protests and political soul-searching.

Key Coverage

Hitting the ‘60 Percent Goal’ Won’t Just Take Work. It Requires a Transformation.

In order to meet its top educational goal, Idaho will need to reinvent itself. And rethink success.

State leaders want more high school graduates to continue their education — to prepare young adults for a changing labor market, and to help Idaho compete economically. This ambitious aim runs headway into hard realities.