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Latest Education News

A collection of the most recent education journalism, curated by EWA staff. 

A collection of the most recent education journalism, curated by EWA staff. 

Latest News

‘I’m Very Worried’ — Virtual High School Admissions: Nothing Like The Real Thing 

It is high school selection time in Philadelphia, a period of decision-making for students and families that can have a profound effect on their futures. But this year some fear that high school selection will be yet another means through which the pandemic exposes and exacerbates inequities, putting this year’s eighth graders at a permanent disadvantage.

Latest News

Parents and Educators Hope the Rise of Online Learning Lives On After the Pandemic, Report Finds. But Researchers Say Privacy Protections Shouldn’t Be Sacrificed

Although the pandemic forced students into an abrupt shift to haphazard online learning earlier this year, a majority of parents and educators support the boom in education technology and hope online learning goes on after the public health emergency subsides, according to a new report.

But researchers argued that the surge in digital education shouldn’t come at the expense of privacy protections that keep kids safe online — even if neither parents nor educators ranked that as an urgent concern.

Latest News

Closed Dorms, Online Classes, No Parties: How College Freshmen Are Coping As The Pandemic Upends Campus Life In A Pivotal Year

During the car parade that served as Delaney Schilt’s high school graduation this spring, the 18-year-old signaled her enthusiasm for new beginnings in what had otherwise become a disappointing string of events.

There was no prom, no signing of yearbooks with classmates and no ceremonious goodbye to her high school in central Wisconsin. Still, the decorations she added to her graduation cap ― sparkly letters that said “Chicago bound” next to a silhouette of the city’s skyline ― helped her remember that things would improve once college started.

Latest News

Parents Are Worried About Schools. Are the Candidates?

Communities large and small are battling over whether and how to reopen schools closed since March. Superintendents are warning of drastic budget cuts on the horizon, teachers’ unions are calling for standardized tests to be canceled for a second straight year and millions of children are learning remotely, with little evaluation of the impact on their academic growth.

Latest News

How Career And Technical Education Shuts Out Black And Latino Students

Historically, career and technical education (CTE) was seen as a dumping ground for students who weren’t considered college material. A two-tier educational system tracked predominantly low-income students and students of color into career and technical classes, then known as vocational education. But in recent years, schools have revamped these courses to prepare students for higher education and lucrative work in fields such as technology, health care and engineering. 

Latest News

Devos’s Handling Of Stalled Student Debt Relief Claims Leads Judge To Reject Settlement

A federal judge on Monday rejected a proposed settlement between the Trump administration and defrauded borrowers after the Education Department revealed its widespread denials of requests for student debt cancellation.

U.S. District Judge William Alsup in the Northern District of California blasted Education Secretary Betsy DeVos for denying 94 percent of the debt relief claims the department has processed since reaching the agreement in April.

Latest News

Research Finds Few Links Between Schools And COVID Cases

Despite widespread concerns, two new international studies show no consistent relationship between in-person K-12 schooling and the spread of coronavirus. And a third study from the United States shows no elevated risk to childcare workers who stayed on the job.

Combined with anecdotal reports from a number of U.S. states where schools are open, as well as a crowdsourced dashboard of around 2000 U.S. schools, some medical experts are saying it’s time to shift the discussion from the risks of opening K-12 schools to the risks of keeping them closed.

Latest News

One of Thomas Jefferson High School’s Few Black Students Speaks Up About the Magnet School’s Lack of Diversity

Didi Elsyad realized that the years at Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology — whose student body is 70 percent Asian, 20 percent White and less than 2 percent Black — had broken her confidence, converted self-love to self-loathing. And that drove a second realization: Didi never wanted another Black student to feel the way she had.

Read the full story here.

Latest News

Why Did Colleges Reopen During the Pandemic?

American colleges botched the pandemic from the very start. Caught off guard in the spring, most of them sent everyone home in a panic, in some cases evicting students who had nowhere else to go. School leaders hemmed and hawed all summer about what to do next and how to do it.

Latest News

Counting Sheep: New Math in Richmond

For years, students in Richmond Public Schools have scored among the lowest in Virginia on state math exams. The district recently adopted a new math curriculum, “Eureka Math,” in an effort to turn those scores around. 

Latest News

Opening Schools and Other Hard Decisions

Emily Oster is a professor of economics at Brown University. She’s also known for her data-driven approach to parenting, which she’s outlined in her two books, Expecting Better and Cribsheet. Earlier this year, Oster brought her parenting approach to an email newsletter that was supposed to cover everything from baby carriers to allergies.

But when the coronavirus upended everything, Oster started writing about making decisions during this time of uncertainty. Like: is it safe for kids to see their grandparents?

Latest News

As Some Disney Workers Lose Their Jobs, Their Free College Education Vanishes, Too

Madeline “Madi” Portes keeps a bucket list full of things like visiting Paris and taking violin lessons. But No. 1 was always to get her college degree, and she never forgot that as the years went by.

Portes, of Clermont, failed several times to finish her schooling, coming from poor roots and unable to afford her classes as a working adult. Maybe this was her shot at age 61 to finally get it done when Walt Disney Co. announced in 2018 it would pay tuition upfront — and books, too — for its hourly employees.

Latest News

With Messages of Change, Student Paintings Cover Shattered Windows at City and County Building

DENVER — According to Assistant Principal Jennifer Anderson, the mission and vision of Noel Community Arts School in Denver is to create artists, activists, and innovators.

Those ideals were on display when students from the school partnered with the mayor’s office to create murals and paintings to cover up shattered windows at the Denver City and County Building.

The building’s windows were shattered following protests against racial injustice in late May.

Latest News

Is Your College in a Severe Wildfire Zone?

As a wall of flame drew closer to the northernmost reaches of the UC Santa Cruz campus, Saxon Stahl knew an evacuation order was imminent. 

Stahl, a student living on campus during summer session, had been following the progress of the CZU Lightning Complex fires that started Aug. 16. By the time the email for voluntary evacuations reached Stahl’s inbox the afternoon of Aug. 20, they leapt at the chance, accepting a voucher to stay at a hotel four miles south. 

They fled the ash raining from the sky, but the smell of campfire lingered still.

Latest News

Illinois ‘Higher Ed Is Facing A Cliff’

Before the COVID-19 pandemic, public university cupboards were already pretty bare.

Two decades of declining state appropriations and repeated financial crisis left schools struggling. The two-year state budget impasse that ended in 2017, when schools limped by with limited state funding, nearly did some schools in.

And now, the pandemic.

Latest News

University of South Florida closing College of Education

Faculty at the University of South Florida learned Wednesday that the university will be eliminating its College of Education, a program that had once been the fifth largest college of education in the country. 

The school plans to phase out its bachelor’s of education degree over the next few years, as the current students enrolled in the program finish. The master’s program will be shifted into another college, and the university will close the door on its College of Education.

Latest News

SUNY Oneonta President Resigns After 700 Students Test Positive for Coronavirus

The State University of New York at Oneonta on Thursday announced the abrupt resignation of its president only weeks after it experienced the most severe coronavirus outbreak of any public university in the state.

The departure of the president, Barbara Jean Morris, is one of the most high-profile over the coronavirus crisis, which has thrown many colleges and universities across the country into turmoil as they try to maintain some semblance of campus life during the outbreak.

Latest News

Kindergarten Enrollment Plummets In Wisconsin Amid Pandemic

The coronavirus pandemic has taken a significant toll on school enrollment in Wisconsin – especially in the youngest grades.

Public schools experienced an about 3% decline in student numbers this fall – compared to less than 1% decline last year. The biggest drop is in 4-year-old kindergarten. 4K numbers fell by about 16% this fall. Regular kindergarten enrollment fell by about 5%.

Read the full story here. 

Latest News

‘Right Now, All Students are Mobile’: New Pandemic Data Confirms a ‘Massive Event’ Disrupting School Enrollment

The Greenville County Schools in South Carolina was expecting enrollment to increase by about 1,000 students this fall, continuing a recent pattern driven by affordable home prices and accolades for “livability.” But instead of hitting the estimate of 78,000 students, officials are predicting a precipitous drop to about 74,000.

Latest News

Latino Immigrant Parents Struggle to Find Help With Distance Learning

Three weeks into the academic year, Veronica Macario’s 10-year-old son had yet to attend class at Manzanita Community School. He had a laptop from the school. He’d received directions on how to log into classes. “But since he doesn’t understand English,” Macario explained in Spanish, “he didn’t understand anything.”

Latest News

Most American Students are Learning Virtually, Poll Shows

The majority of America’s public school students are learning exclusively online, according to a new national poll of their parents — and most of those parents want school officials to focus on improving that experience.

Latest News

Coronavirus Appears To Be Driving Student Enrollment Drops

Orange County, Fla., has 18,000 missing students. The Miami-Dade County public schools have 16,000 fewer than last year. Los Angeles Unified — the nation’s second-largest school system — is down nearly 11,000. Charlotte-Mecklenburg in North Carolina has 5,000 missing. Utah, Virginia, and Washington are reporting declines statewide.

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (Oct. 9-15)
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week:

For The Washington Post’s second story in their series on George Floyd’s America, Laura Meckler looks at Floyd’s dreams as a high schooler and the education system that fails students like him.

For The New York Times, Alina Tugend, Phyllis W. Jordan and Mark A. Stein highlight examples of creativity in a time of crisis.

Larry Gordon of EdSource covers the pandemic’s impact on the college application and recruiting process.

Latest News

Isaiah Marquez-Greene Survived Sandy Hook Shooting. Covid-19 Poses New School Threat.

The teen was sitting on his living room couch watching another episode of “The Office” when the email popped up on his cellphone. Isaiah Marquez-Greene skimmed past the opening two paragraphs until, at the third, he paused: “This decision to open campus …” He was thrilled. Four months into the pandemic, Isaiah, 16, longed to play hockey, to see his friends, to return for his sophomore year to the Connecticut boarding school he had worked so hard to get into. Maybe this news meant all those things would happen, he thought for a moment, before the reality of who he is came back to him.

Latest News

Teen Learning Pods are Free and Have Space

As the Sonoma Valley school district and Boys & Girls Club search for more space to hold distance learning pod programs for young students, they have more than enough space and are searching for teens to fill seats in their teen pod program, officials said.

“It’s kind of disappointing the number of kids coming for distance learning,” at the teen center, said Becky Jo Peterson, executive director of Teen Services Sonoma, which has merged its services with the teen programs of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Sonoma Valley.

Latest News

How Schools Are Navigating Privacy Concerns in COVID-19 Contact Tracing

As plans to reopen schools have ramped up across the country, so too have administrators’ efforts to contain the spread of the deadly coronavirus.

That’s why many districts have turned to contact tracing, a system that aims to identify and alert those who may have been exposed to students and staff members who have tested positive for COVID-19.

How that’s accomplished varies widely from district to district. And while, overall, experts say these efforts are off to a good start, some methods have raised concerns about student privacy.

Latest News

METCO Schools Are at the Intersection of the Pandemic and Racism

But choosing to let her daughter go to school also reveals Castro’s distrust of remote learning. She believes that when Bedford went completely virtual in March, it compromised the learning experience for students. Let down in the spring, she chose the hybrid learning option for this school year.

Read the full story here.

Latest News

Songbirds Replace School Bells As Classrooms Move Outdoors For A Fortunate Few

As elected officials, teachers, and parents grapple with how to educate children in the middle of a pandemic, some schools are turning to the great outdoors: pitching tents, buying rain boots, and roughing it with their students in the elements. The catalyst for the move is that the risk of coronavirus transmission is much lower outside, though students at Hartsbrook  School, a K-12 private school in Western Massachusetts, and other outdoor schools, still wear masks and stay socially distant.

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (Sept. 25 – Oct. 1)
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week:

In his new series, The Atlantic’s Adam Harris profiles the students who desegregated American schools.

In recent years, a number of politically appointed public university boards have used their broad powers to wade into contentious territory that often splits along partisan lines, reports a team from The Chronicle of Higher Education.

Latest News

Where Donald Trump and Joe Biden Stand on Child Care and Universal Preschool

THE CHILD CARE SYSTEM in the U.S. was already at a tipping point prior to the coronavirus pandemic – too few options, astronomical costs and workers earning some of the lowest wages in the country.

But when COVID-19 infection rates spiked last spring, triggering the closures of thousands of child care centers across the country, many without plans to ever reopen, the crisis catapulted into the collective conscience and onto the center stage of the presidential election.

Key Coverage

‘A Battle for the Souls of Black Girls’

Zulayka McKinstry’s once silly, sociable daughter has stopped seeing friends, talking to siblings and trusting anyone — changes Ms. McKinstry dates to the day in January 2019 when her daughter’s school principal decided that “hyper and giddy” were suspicious behaviors in a 12-year-old girl.

Ms. McKinstry’s daughter was sent to the nurse’s office and forced to undress so that she could be searched for contraband that did not exist.

Latest News

Will Washington-area Schools Publicly Report Coronavirus Cases? Many Say No.

As schools in the Washington area inch toward reopening, a question looms: whether and how school districts will report coronavirus cases among students and staff.

Reporting policies vary district-to-district across D.C., Maryland and Virginia, but many school systems in the region are opting to stay mostly mum. Some school officials say they are not tracking or publishing data on school-related virus cases — only notifying people who may have come into contact with infected individuals.

Latest News

The Forbes Investigation: How The SAT Failed America

Chaos. That’s the effect COVID-19 has had on America’s system of higher education, which was already struggling before the pandemic. One need look no further than the current state of affairs at the College Board, long regarded as an impenetrable fortress among the ivory towers.

Latest News

After-school Programs Struggle to Meet Demand, Find Funding During Pandemic, Surveys Say

As social distancing ramped up last spring, many after-school programs moved from in-person to providing online activities in efforts to keep kids engaged. As of early April, three out of four after-school programs were not operating on a normal schedule. Seventy-eight percent were providing remote services or using other ways to stay connected. Some programs provided lunches, groceries and diapers for families hard hit by the pandemic.

Latest News

Affluent Campuses Fill With Kids, Poorer Schools Remain Mostly Online

Young children from predominantly white neighborhoods in Jupiter and Palm Beach Gardens have returned in droves to public school campuses, while the vast majority of students in poor, high-minority neighborhoods continue to learn from home.

Overall, little more than a third of the 170,000 students enrolled in Palm Beach County public schools showed up for in-person classes when schools reopened last week.

Latest News

More Doctoral Programs Suspend Admissions. That Could Have Lasting Effects on Graduate Education.

More than 50 doctoral programs in the humanities and social sciences won’t be admitting new students in the fall of 2021 — a response to the pandemic and ensuing economic turmoil. It’s a sort of financial triage to help the programs devote funding to their current students, many of whom will be delayed in completing their degrees because of the disruptions. Suspending admissions for a year, some administrators say, will also allow them to reimagine their doctoral curricula to account for the flagging Ph.D. job market.

Latest News

University of Georgia Grapples with Student Discrimination Complaints

The University of Georgia has faced criticism in recent days from Black and Hispanic student leaders and organizations that it has not adequately responded to discrimination complaints.

The complaints stem from incidents involving crude images, sexist language and racial slurs, the students say. They want leadership at the state’s flagship university to enact measures that result in a better learning environment for students of color.

Latest News

The New Order

It was a long time coming; 140 years, in fact.

When Republicans seized control of both chambers of North Carolina’s General Assembly, in 2010, for the first time in more than a century, they quickly set about remaking a politically moderate state that Barack Obama had carried in the presidential election just two years earlier.

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The Students Left Behind by Remote Learning

Shemar, a twelve-year-old from East Baltimore, is good at math, and Karen Ngosso, his fourth-grade math teacher, at Abbottston Elementary School, is one reason why. “I would try to pump him up and tell him, ‘You’re a good student,’ ” she said. But she knew that he didn’t get enough sleep, and he was often absent. His home situation, like those of many of her students, was unstable: his mother suffered from drug addiction, and they moved frequently.

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (Sept. 18 -24)
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week:

Although some school districts publish detailed data about coronavirus case counts, others reveal little or no information, reports Ty Tagami of The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

EdSurge’s Jeffrey R. Young covers what’s left of campus life for students to enjoy at a time of social isolation and how professors are coping.