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Latest Education News

A collection of the most recent education journalism, curated by EWA staff. 

A collection of the most recent education journalism, curated by EWA staff. 

Latest News

How Do Kids Learn to Read? What the Science Says

How do children learn to read?

For almost a century, researchers have argued over the question. Most of the disagreement has centered on the very beginning stages of the reading process, when young children are first starting to figure out how to decipher words on a page.

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (Sept. 27 – Oct. 3)
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

In a new investigation Jessica Calefati, Jesenia De Moya Correa and Kristen A. Graham of the Philadelphia Inquirer look at troubling discrepancies in student attendance records that could threaten per-pupil funding for one of the city’s struggling high schools. 

The decline in the share of middle-class college students has prompted schools to offer special scholarships, reports Jon Marcus for The Hechinger Report

Latest News

Summer Offers Opportunities for Social and Academic Growth, But Can Also Put Disadvantaged Children at Risk
The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine

 Summer is a chance for children and youth to continue developing, but for those living in disadvantaged communities, summertime experiences can lead to worse health, social, emotional, academic, and safety outcomes, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

Latest News

Nearly all the Seniors at This Charter School Went to College. Only 6 out of 52 Finished on Time.
Casey Parks

In 2012, almost all of Sci Academy’s seniors were accepted at college; seven years later, 65 percent had dropped out.

Newspapers had reported that nearly everyone in Williams’s graduating class at Sci Academy in New Orleans had been accepted to college, as if they were a group moving toward one unprecedented future together.

Member Stories

Sept. 20 – 26
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For Education Week, Arianna Prothero and Denise R. Superville report on how districts are waking up to the idea that ensuring safety at school-sponsored events after hours and off campus deserves heightened attention.

Latest News

250,000 Kids. $277 Million in Fines. It’s Been 3 Years Since Feds Ordered a Special Ed Reboot in Texas — Why Are Students Still Being Denied?

The Texas Education Agency in 2004 imposed an arbitrary, illegal cap on the number of students that schools could deem eligible for special education.

Since then, advocates estimate, some 250,000 children a year have ended up  unable to get schools or districts to acknowledge their needs, much less provide appropriate instruction. Few advocates and even fewer parents understood that an official policy, presumably imposed to cut costs, was driving those refusals.

Latest News

Undocumented Immigrant Kids Fill Worthington, Minnesota’s Schools. Their Bus Driver Is Leading the Funding Backlash.

Those children, some of whom crossed the U.S.-Mexico border alone, have fueled a bitter debate about immigration in Worthington, a community of 13,000 that has received more unaccompanied minors per capita than almost anywhere in the country, according to data from the Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR).

Member Stories

Sept. 13 – 19
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For Chalkbeat, Dylan Peers McCoy uncovers how Indiana’s lax regulation of home schooling and its method for calculating graduation rates are masking the extent of many schools’ dropout problems.

Arizona residents aren’t advancing to training and education after high school, raising concerns about the consequences for the state’s economy and quality of life, reports Rachel Leingang for The Arizona Republic.

Latest News

Economists Find Free Community Colleges Can Backfire

College is expensive, so what’s the best way to help more Americans afford a degree? One team of researchers has a surprising answer. The most cost-effective way to increase the number of Americans who get a four-year degree, they found, is to increase tax-payer spending at all public colleges and eliminate tuition for students from families with incomes under $60,000 a year.

Latest News

Do Texas Teachers Have The Right To Free Speech? Anti-immigration Tweets Have One Educator’s Fate In Limbo

It was a tweet to the president pleading for him to do “anything you can do to remove the illegals from Fort Worth.”

The high school teacher, who went on to ask for help in “actively investigating and removing the illegals that are in public school system,” now awaits a decision on whether or not she can keep her job.

But the tweets of Georgia Clark pose a larger question for educators as a divisive presidential election nears: When do teachers cross the free-speech line?

In short, it’s a complicated balancing act.

Member Stories

Sept. 6 – 12
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

New texting programs have helped low-income parents and caregivers develop habits at home that help their kids succeed, reports Erin Richards for USA Today.

For The Chronicle of Higher Education, Sarah Brown reports on the pressure that leads to high turnover in Title IX coordinator positions.

EdSurge’s Emily Tate examines a first-of-its-kind apprenticeship program for early childhood educators in Philadelphia.

Latest News

More Students Are Attending Schools With Children Of Different Races Than Ever Before

The number of children attending U.S. public schools with students of other races has nearly doubled over the past quarter century, a little-noticed surge that reflects the nation’s shifting demographics, a Washington Post analysis has found.

At the same time, children in most big cities and many suburbs remain locked in deeply segregated districts, with black students more likely to be enrolled in segregated districts than Hispanics or whites, The Post found.

Latest News

Chicago High Schools Going From ‘College Prep’ To ‘Early College’

In Chicago, the proliferation of college classes in high schools is new. Since 2014, the number of students taking classes through City Colleges at their high school has tripled, from 1,055 in 2013-2014 to 3,655 in 2017-2018. And Chicago Public Schools data released last week shows almost 15% of 2019 graduates had earned at least one college credit through a class at their high school, up from about 5% in 2014.

Latest News

What College Admissions Offices Really Want

In the fall of 2014, Angel Pérez was hired to oversee enrollment at Trinity College, a small liberal-arts school that occupies a picturesque 100-acre hillside campus overlooking Hartford. Trinity is in many ways a typical private northeastern college. It was founded by a group of Episcopalians in the early 19th century, and its student body has been dominated ever since by white, wealthy graduates of New England prep schools.

Latest News

Rethinking the Context of Edtech

Sociologists specialize in context. We like to describe things, and sometimes we like to predict things. We’ve done both in the area of education technology (“edtech”). The British sociologist Neil Selwyn first proposed the idea of a sociology of education and technology, and he has been focusing on this issue for at least twenty years.1 Yet in a more recent book chapter, Selwyn and his colleagues noted that most of the research and writing on education technology is somewhat limited in its scope and in its ambition.2

Latest News

17 Questions Every College Should Be Asking – The Atlantic

In this context, the institutions that shape them in their late teens and 20s become all the more important. This should be driving us to ask harder questions of those who would lead our colleges and universities through the digital disruption of society. We should raise big questions about purpose and effectiveness, about technology and place, and about human capital, both inside and outside the school.

Latest News

More Than Half of Denver’s Public Schools Are Segregated, 25 Years After Busing Ended

The just-opened Denver Green School Northfield sits in a predominantly white neighborhood, but the kids inside represent just about every shade from ebony to alabaster.

That’s by design. In a district that’s still working to desegregate a half-century after the end of the civil rights era, the school is about one-quarter Hispanic, 22% black and 41% white, with the rest of the students identifying as multiracial or Asian.

Member Stories

Aug. 30 – Sept. 5
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

For The Hechinger Report, Amadou Diallo highlights how one District of Columbia charter school weaves social and emotional learning and character education into the educational experience.

Parents are having second thoughts about the push for tech-heavy classrooms as questions arise on how much it is actually helping students learn, reports Betsy Morris and Tawnell D. Hobbs for The Wall Street Journal.

Latest News

Temporary Expanded Public Service Loan Forgiveness Denies Most Requests

A new report from a government watchdog, first obtained obtained by NPR, says an expanded effort by Congress to forgive the student loans of public servants is remarkably unforgiving.

Congress created the expansion program last year in response to a growing outcry. Thousands of borrowers — nurses, teachers and other public servants — complained that the requirements for the original program were so rigid and poorly communicated that lawmakers needed to step in. But, documents show, even this expansion of the Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) program isn’t working.

Member Stories

August 23 – 29
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In a multi-part series, reporters at WLRN in South Florida examine the complex story of what’s transpired since the state created the first all-charter school district.

For WHYY, Kevin McCorry and Avi Wolfman-Arent spent the summer at a North Philadelphia rec center, offering a glimpse into the lives of children in the city’s most distressed neighborhoods.

Member Stories

Aug 16 – Aug 22
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The 74’s Mark Keierleber examines the surreal journey of Julia Keleher, Puerto Rico’s former education secretary now facing charges in a federal corruption probe.

For the Washington Monthly, Anne Kim raises questions about the growing trend of summer “pre-college” programs at the nation’s most prestigious universities.

Latest News

The Pre-College Racket

These posts reflect the growing trend of summer “pre-college” programs at the nation’s most prestigious universities. Stanford, which launched its “pre-collegiate studies” program in 2012, hosts three-week summer sessions for high schoolers with course options on more than fifty different subjects, in addition to the mock trial program Kirstin hoped to attend. Similar programs abound at other elite institutions. In fact, of the top forty schools ranked in U.S.

Member Stories

Aug 9 – Aug 15
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For APM Reports, Chris Julin examines the challenges facing the country’s growing number of homeless students.

As the LeBron James-affiliated I Promise School enters its second year, leaders look to build on their success while feeling pressure to meet high expectations, reports Jennifer Pignolet of the Akron Beacon Journal/Ohio.com

Member Stories

Aug 2 – Aug 8
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For NJ Advance Media, Kelly Heyboer and Adam Clark reveal how a web of red tape allows some teachers to work for years after they have been accused of serious misconduct.

A school in Georgia is under fire for a policy prohibiting hairstyles popular among black students, reports Marlon A. Walker for The Atlanta-Journal Constitution

Member Stories

July 26 – Aug 1
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

Amid a national discussion on desegregation, Jefferson County Public Schools may have found a model that balances diversity with equitable school choice, reports Olivia Krauth for Insider Louisville.

With changes to Title IX looming at the federal level, students at the University of Nebraska are pushing for reforms locally, reports Chris Dunker for the Lincoln Journal Star.

Member Stories

July 19 – July 25
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

Can increasing teachers’ pay solve the problem of teacher shortages? For The Atlanta Journal Constitution, Marlon A. Walker explains why there’s reason to be skeptical.

In The Chronicle of Higher Education, Eric Kelderman and Dan Bauman detail how a series of missteps have led one university to the brink of financial ruin.

Member Stories

July 12 – July 18
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Long a poster child for America’s prison problems, California’s prison system has developed a promising new educational approach that may serve as a blueprint for other states, reports Wayne D’Orio for The Hechinger Report.

In an investigation for EdSurge, Emily Tate examines a disturbing side of the thriving online English-tutoring market.

Member Stories

June 28 – July 11
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

For The Washington Post, Jessica Contrera chronicles a hate crime at a Maryland high school, and the emotional reckoning that followed. 

Latino children make up nearly half of Boston’s public school students, yet the collective voice of their parents does not loom large in the system, reports Bianca Vázquez Toness for WGBH.

Member Stories

June 21 – June 27
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For NOLA.com and The Times Picayune, Wilborn Nobles III explores the complex state of school discipline reform in New Orleans where expulsions are down but suspensions are up. 

In project that took him from Oklahoma to England — and supported in part by an EWA Reporting Fellowship –  Ben Felder explores the promise of higher education programs in prisons in a series for The Oklahoman

Member Stories

June 14 – June 20
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The nation’s seventh-largest school district is embarking on a massive effort to address students’ challenges outside the classroom, reports Jacob Carpenter for the Houston Chronicle.

For The Christian Science Monitor, Stacy Teicher Khadaroo examines a historic vote at Georgetown University and what it reveals about the national dialogue over a call for reparations for slavery.

Member Stories

June 7 – June 13
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A plan to close a predominantly black high school in Michigan is unfolding as the first crisis of Gretchen Whitmer’s governorship, writes Jennifer Chambers for The Detroit News.

The Rivard Report’s Emily Donaldson examines how a lack of paid maternity leave can create challenges for Texas teachers planning a family.

Member Stories

May 31 – June 6
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Despite privacy concerns, America’s schools are increasingly monitoring students’ online lives, reports Education Week’s Benjamin Herold.

WAMU’s Jenny Abamu continues exploring schools’ use of restraint and seclusion, and why it often goes unreported.

For USA Today, Erin Richards and Matt Wynn examine how teachers’ salaries stack up to the cost of living in cities across the country.

Member Stories

May 24 – May 30
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In an investigation for the Connecticut Mirror and ProPublica, Jacqueline Rabe Thomas examines how some of the state’s richest towns fight to maintain housing segregation, and the implications for schools.

A Texas school district’s sex education curriculum could be in jeopardy as the state looks to limit business with Planned Parenthood, reports Melissa Taboada for the Austin American-Statesman.

Key Coverage

Lost Days: Poverty, Isolation Drive Students Away From School In California’s Rural Districts

Twenty-six percent, or about 600 students, at Oroville Union High School District were chronically absent during the 2017-18 school year, according to an EdSource analysis of California Department of Education data.

Statewide, more than 700,000 students, or about 11 percent, were chronically absent. About 10 percent of the 1,000 districts statewide had rates near the level of Oroville Union High’s or significantly higher. Most of those districts were in rural areas, the analysis found:

Member Stories

May 17 – May 23
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

For Houston Public Media, Laura Isensee tells the story of one teenager’s slow struggle to rebuild her life after a school shooter nearly took it from her.

The nation’s student loan forgiveness program for public servants is a disaster, writes Kimberly Hefling for Politico.

In a growing number of cities, taxpayers are choosing to foot the bill for high-quality public pre-K, writes Brenda Iasevoli for The Hechinger Report.

Key Coverage

More High-School Students Are Using This Hack to Get a Head-Start on College — but the Poorest Students Are Being Left Behind

“That was wild.”

That’s how Victor Orduna describes his life as a teenager in southwest Chicago’s Gage Park neighborhood. And he isn’t talking about partying with friends or other high-school high-jinks.

Orduna is referring to his schedule. The now 19-year old would wake up around 6:30 a.m., head to his high school until the late afternoon, and then clock in for his job at a local supermarket, where he’d bag groceries until 10:30 p.m. Some weekends, Orduna worked the late shift at a pizzeria, slinging pizzas and cooking burgers until 1:30 a.m.

Key Coverage

Inside the Nationwide Effort to Tackle the $1.5 Trillion Student-Debt Crisis — With the Help of High-School Students

There’s not much Barack Obama and Betsy DeVos see eye-to-eye on.

But the 44th president of the United States and the Trump administration’s controversial education secretary have found some common ground.

Obama and DeVos — as well as many local, state and federal politicians — have heralded the idea of students taking college courses and earning college credits while still in high school.

Key Coverage

Pathways to Prosperity: Cleveland Can Learn From European Approach to Education, Training

Sharon Braat is glad she’s going to college in the Netherlands and not the U.S.

It’s not just the nearly-free tuition her country offers. It’s the practical and hands-on classes aimed at her career. In her case, it also includes real work for actual businesses while in school.

“Our system is better for preparing you for where you want to go,” she said. “You feel like you’re in a company… If you screw up, you can screw up big time. It’s the real world.” 

Key Coverage

Deserted in the Desert

Thousands of records examined by the Las Vegas Review-Journal show a yearslong history of abuse and neglect allegations at Northwest Academy, a private boarding school for at-risk youth.

Key Coverage

DeVos Might Not Serve as Ed. Secretary If Trump Re-elected

Betsy DeVos hinted Monday that should President Donald Trump get re-elected in 2020 that she might not serve as education secretary during his second term.

“I’m not sure my husband would be OK with that,” said DeVos of her husband, Dick DeVos, a former Michigan gubernatorial candidate, after hesitating before delivering her response.

Key Coverage

A Search For Answers, A Search For Blame

Max Eden didn’t even want to read about Parkland. He saw the news on Valentine’s Day, after a dinner date with his girlfriend at a little French place in Washington, D.C., taking an Uber home. There was the gut-punch—“oh shit, another school shooting”—then the queasy afterthought that none of this hits as hard as it used to. He knew what would follow. For a few angry weeks, Democrats would demand gun control and Republicans would call for arming teachers. He decided he’d sit it out this time, ignore the news as much as possible.

Report

(Report) Nonwhite School Districts Get $23 Billion Less Than White Districts Despite Serving the Same Number of Students

The story of our communities can in many ways be told through the lens of the school districts that serve our children. More than organizations that enable learning, school districts are geographic boundaries that serve as magnifying lenses that allow us to focus on issues of race and wealth. They are both a statement of “what is” and “what could be” in our society.

Key Coverage

3 States Tried to Shutter Failing For-Profit Online Charter Schools. A Suspicious Pattern of Allegations, Accusations, and Legal Complaints Quickly Followed
The 74

On their face, the allegations describe public officials being bought — and for a pittance. Drinks in a hotel lobby. Airfare reimbursement for a meeting. A $4,000 “personal payment” appearing just before a mid-level functionary inks a government contract for the consultant offering the so-called perks.

Indeed, the legal complaints filed in South Carolina, Georgia, and Nevada have resulted in a string of juicy headlines. And later, though ostensibly unrelated, in the resignations of two of the state employees named.