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Latest Education News

A collection of the most recent education journalism, curated by EWA staff. 

A collection of the most recent education journalism, curated by EWA staff. 

Latest News

Behind the Consulting Firm Raking In Millions From D.C. Charter Schools

TenSquare has powerful allies in D.C., most notable among them the Public Charter School Board, or PCSB, which governs the city’s charters. “I would characterize their results as remarkably strong,” says Scott Pearson, executive director of the PCSB. “In every case where TenSquare has done a full turnaround with a D.C. charter school, their results have improved significantly.”

Latest News

This Memphis Poetry Team Is the Best in the State. But They Will Scatter as Their School Closes.

MarQuita Henderson had a vision for how her senior year of high school at GRAD Academy Memphis was going to go.

The 11th-grader was going to continue leading her school’s award-winning poetry team, which she believes changed her life. She was going to graduate with her best friends. She was already working on a poem to perform at graduation.

Latest News

Cyber Charters in at Least 5 States Face Closure. What’s Going On?

After years of operating largely unfettered, the country’s full-time online charter school sector appears to be undergoing a shift.

Nowhere are the changes more evident than in Ohio, where the state’s largest cyber charter, the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow, is in the midst of auctioning off its assets following a startling midyear shutdown.  

Cyber charters in Georgia, Indiana, Nevada, and New Mexico are also facing closure.

Latest News

Socioeconomic Mobility and the Future of College

The evidence is clear: A college degree is, in most cases, the key to more money and a more comfortable standard of living. But that pathway to higher earnings is more available to some than others: A lot of elite colleges do not enroll a lot of low-income students, and as a result they’re not boosting very many students from low-income households into the middle and upper classes.

Latest News

Are Teacher Walkouts Possible in Mississippi?

Teachers in Oklahoma, West Virginia, Arizona, Colorado, Kentucky and now North Carolina have made national headlines as they strike for better wages, policy matters and other various reasons. AFT President Randi Weingarten said in states like Mississippi where funding challenges are an “uphill battle,” paths to change can seem impossible.

Member Stories

May 18-May 24
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

Laura Isensee of Houston Public Media looks at a school safety approach using armed officers on campus. 

Legal definitions can get murky when it comes to investigations of campus sexual assault, writes Eric Kelderman of The Chronicle of Higher Education. 

Sally Ho ofthe Associated Press looks at the impact of education funding by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. 

Latest News

Despite Progress, Newsroom Diversity Remains A Big Challenge for Education Journalism in 2018

Last week in Los Angeles, the Education Writers Association (EWA) hosted an event for education journalists that – for the first time I’m aware – focused explicitly on newsroom diversity.

The #EWA18 “Room For All?” conference featured several panels focused on helping journalists understand the importance of diversity for journalism as well as for education.

Latest News

Montana Students React To Texas School Shooting

During first period English last Friday at Capital high school in Helena, student Noah Whitehorn, felt his phone buzz with a notification; 10 people were dead following a school shooting in a small town just outside of Houston, Texas.

“I almost cried in the middle of English class. How is this still happening? After all that we’ve done in the past few months you’d think that at least something would have been accomplished.”

Latest News

Study: 2013 Chicago School Closings Failed To Help Students

Despite Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s promise that mass school closings in 2013 would lead to a “brighter future,” Chicago students didn’t benefit academically and on average their performance suffered, particularly in math, according to a University of Chicago Consortium on School Research study released on Tuesday.

The groundbreaking study goes on to report that for students and teachers, the transition was traumatic and chaotic.

Latest News

Montana Students React To Texas School Shooting

During first period English last Friday at Capital high school in Helena, student Noah Whitehorn, felt his phone buzz with a notification; 10 people were dead following a school shooting in a small town just outside of Houston, Texas.

“I almost cried in the middle of English class. How is this still happening? After all that we’ve done in the past few months you’d think that at least something would have been accomplished.”

Latest News

Leaders of California’s Big University Systems Look Ahead at Finances, Safety, Capacity

Finances, safety and institutional capacity are the main challenges ahead for two of the nation’s biggest university systems, according to their leaders, who discussed the topics recently at the Education Writers Association National Seminar in Los Angeles.

University of California (UC) President Janet Napolitano and California State University (CSU) System Chancellor Dr. Timothy P. White addressed a group of education reporters during a panel discussion last week titled, “What’s in Store for Big University Systems?”

Latest News

Education Writers’ Conference Weighs School Violence, Teacher Unrest – Education and the Media

Education journalists from across the nation gathered here this week with a focus on diversity in their profession, recent activism by teachers, and the scourge of school violence, among other topics.

The Education Writers Association’s top award for education reporting went to John Woodrow Cox of The Washington Post for a compelling three-part series on children and gun violence, which was published last June.

Latest News

Teachers Unions Grapple With Strikes, Pivotal Supreme Court Case

Lily Eskelsen García, president of the National Education Association teachers union, told Morning Education in an interview last week in Los Angeles during the Education Writers Association conference that there’s a big connection between the two issues. She said it’s worth noting that the states with teacher labor unrest are not collective bargaining states that allow the fees.

Latest News

Immigrant Teens Pushed Into Miami-Dade Adult Education Programs

They come fleeing gang violence and repressive regimes. They come after hurricanes and earthquakes. They come in search of work and an education.

But in Miami-Dade County, a place built by the aspirations of newcomers, hundreds of immigrant teens will never graduate from high school.

Latest News

Damning Report Shows Portland Public Schools disregard of sexual misconduct Over Decades

Portland Public Schools fielded report after report that educator Mitch Whitehurst engaged in sexual misconduct with students, starting the very first year of his 32-year career, a damning investigation released Thursday says.

District officials’ failure to stop him and the district’s lack of improvement in training and protocols to this day indicates an urgent need for Oregon’s largest school district to overhaul how it handles sexual misconduct, the report says.

Member Stories

May 4 – May 10
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week.

Education Week’s Andrew Ujifusa and Alex Harwin examine pronounced fluctuations in the number of desegregation cases reported by school districts.

In Charlotte, N.C., officials want more money to hire mental health workers because of increased demand in schools, Gwendolyn Glenn reports for WFAE.

 

Latest News

Colorado Schools Gave Out Nearly 1,800 Suspensions To Young Students With Disabilities Last Year

 A Chalkbeat analysis shows that last year among Colorado students in kindergarten through second grade, nearly one-third of 6,080 out-of-school suspensions were meted out to special education students — even though they make up just 9 percent of K-2 enrollment.

Amid the continuing national debate over the fairness, effectiveness, and risks of suspension, the rate stands out to experts.

Key Coverage

Parkland Shooting: Survivor Kyle Laman’s Journey to Recovery

He thought he’d be safe backstage, out of the spotlight, away from the shadows that prowled the edges of his vision when his guard was down.

Crowds spooked him now. It was seven weeks since he had locked eyes with a black-masked gunman taking aim at him in the midst of the worst school shooting in Florida’s history. Seven weeks since he’d made the split-second decision that saved his life but left a softball-sized hole in his leg. Seven weeks since he’d seen bullets lodging in the wall around him as he ran past bodies of his classmates in a wild panic to survive.

Latest News

Ave Maria Commencement Speaker Betsy DeVos Gets Standing Ovation

U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos delivered the commencement address to a welcoming crowd Saturday at Ave Maria University.

In her roughly 20-minute speech, DeVos focused on the teachings of religious figures, including Jesus Christ, former Pope John Paul II and Mother Teresa, and emphasized the importance of service to God, country and neighbor.

The speech earned DeVos a standing ovation from the roughly 230 undergraduate students and their relatives and friends.

Latest News

Stoneman Douglas Shooter Was Assigned To Controversial Broward Discipline Program, Officials Now Say

Broward school district officials admitted Sunday that the confessed Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School gunman was assigned to a controversial disciplinary program, after the superintendent repeatedly claimed Nikolas Cruz had “no connection” to the alternative punishment designed to limit on-campus arrests.

Two sources with knowledge of Cruz’s discipline records told WLRN he was referred to the so-called PROMISE Program for a three-day stint after committing vandalism at Westglades Middle School in 2013.

Latest News

‘I Never Want to Be in a Neighborhood Where I’m Shot at Again’

When Mario Martinez went to Liberty University, a private Christian college in Lynchburg, Virginia, the affluence astonished him. A student’s car would break down and she’d have a new one within a couple of weeks. “It was mind blowing,” he said. “To see that people can have so much.”

And Liberty — with a median family income of about $75,000 a year — isn’t even that rich compared to what you will find at America’s most prestigious private colleges, where incomes are closer to $200,000 a year or more.

Key Coverage

Children Face Potential Poisoning From Lead, Mold, Asbestos in Philadelphia Schools, Investigation Shows

Every school day in Philadelphia, children are exposed to a stew of environmental hazards, both visible and invisible, that can rob them of a healthy place to learn and thrive. Too often, the district knows of the perils but downplays them to parents.

As part of its “Toxic City” series, the Inquirer and Daily News investigated the physical conditions at district-run schools. Reporters examined five years of internal maintenance logs and building records, and interviewed 120 teachers, nurses, parents, students, and experts.

Latest News

This Program Is Proven to Help Moms and Babies—so Why Aren’t We Investing in It More?

Every week, up to 75 home visitors like Williams from several home visiting programs fan out across Hillsborough County, which encompasses Tampa. They bring books, toys and reading materials about child development, provide tips on how to deal with tantrums and help parents navigate everything: their own mental health needs, safe sleep habits for their babies, and immunizations. These simple interactions between nurses and moms can have stunning results.

Latest News

Why Are New York’s Schools Segregated? It’s Not as Simple as Housing

When asked about school segregation in New York City, Mayor Bill de Blasio has said that schools are segregated because neighborhoods are: “We cannot change the basic reality of housing in New York City.”

Now, as a debate about plans to integrate middle schools has engulfed one Manhattan district, a report released on Wednesday undermines that notion. It found that a full 40 percent of New York City kindergartners do not attend the nearby school to which they are assigned. That’s a vast stream of 27,000 5-year-olds funneling through the city each day.

Member Stories

April 27 – May 3
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week.

In suburban Illinois, vocational training is getting fresh attention — and funding, writes Rafael Guerrero of The Courier News. 

Reporting for Colorado Public Radio, Jenny Brundin looks at allegations of misconduct and abuse against a teacher at a public school for the arts. 

 

Latest News

Three Black Teens Are Finalists In A NASA Competition. Hackers Spewing Racism Tried To Ruin Their Odds

The three D.C. students couldn’t believe the news. They’d developed a method to purify lead-contaminated water in school drinking fountains, and NASA announced last month that they were finalists in the agency’s prestigious high school competition — the only all-black, female team to make it that far.

The next stage of the science competition included public voting, and the Banneker High School students — Mikayla Sharrieff, India Skinner and Bria Snell, all 17-year-old high school juniors — turned to social media to promote their project.

Latest News

‘The Money Shot’: How School Districts Find And Prove Residency Fraud

There are 63 school districts in the four collar counties surrounding Philadelphia, and nearly all of them spend time and money making sure students from outside the district don’t try to sneak in. Enforcement is necessary, administrators say, to ensure that legal residents  — and legal residents alone — receive the benefits of their tax dollars. Several district officials said they’ve increased their vigilance in recent years. And the trend isn’t limited to Pennsylvania. Districts around the region — from Washington, D.C. to New Jersey — use private investigators.

Latest News

Documents Show Ties Between University, Conservative Donors

Virginia’s largest public university granted the conservative Charles Koch Foundation a say in the hiring and firing of professors in exchange for millions of dollars in donations, according to newly released documents. The release of donor agreements between George Mason University and the foundation follows years of denials by university administrators that Koch foundation donations inhibit academic freedom.

Latest News

UC System Excels in Graduating Poor Students

The idea is clear, simple, and generally agreed upon: Colleges need to do more when it comes to enrolling and graduating low-income students. If college degrees are “the great equalizer”—though some research has disputed that characterization—then expanding access to those degrees will help make society more equal. Are any colleges succeeding in doing that?

Latest News

Unionized Or Not, Teachers Struggle To Make Ends Meet

More than 9 in 10 teachers say they joined the profession for idealistic reasons — “I wanted to do good” — but most are struggling to some extent economically. Those findings come from a nationally representative survey by NPR and Ipsos of more than 500 teachers across the country. The poll was conducted in April amid widespread walkouts in several states, including Colorado, Oklahoma, Kentucky, West Virginia, and currently Arizona.

Latest News

Teacher Pay Is So Low in Some U.S. School Districts That They’re Recruiting Overseas

The latest wave of foreign workers sweeping into American jobs brought Donato Soberano from the Philippines to Arizona two years ago. He had to pay thousands of dollars to a job broker and lived for a time in an apartment with five other Filipino workers. The lure is the pay — 10 times more than what he made doing the same work back home. But Mr. Soberano is not a hospitality worker or a home health aide. He is in another line of work that increasingly pays too little to attract enough Americans: Mr. Soberano is a public school teacher.

Latest News

The Real Free-Speech Crisis Is Professors Being Disciplined for Liberal Views, a Scholar Finds

Many conservative pundits will tell you that one of the most vaunted of American values, free speech, is under siege by undergraduates across the nation. And their prime targets are conservative speakers, among them Milo Yiannopoulos, whose aborted speech last year at the University of California at Berkeley at the hands of riotous protesters still serves as evidence of the intolerant left.

Latest News

Opinion: Worried About Risky Teenage Behavior? Make School Tougher

Like all parents of teenagers, I worry that my children will engage in risky behavior, including drinking, smoking and drug use. The more time they spend doing healthier extracurricular activities — soccer, piano, cleaning their rooms (ha!) — the better.

But it turns out that what they do in school can also affect their choices outside the classroom.

Latest News

Audio: 28,000 LA preschoolers are Learning How to be Better Humans

I don’t want to be your friend. Stay away. I’m not going to share with you.

These harsh statements are “very normal to hear at the beginning of the school year,” for preschool teachers like Rafaela Campos. To push past those moments of mean, she and more than a thousand other early educators in the Los Angeles Unified School District now have a new tool.

Latest News

Survey of Community College Presidents’ Views on Range of Issues

Enrollment concerns and finances remain the biggest challenges community college presidents say they face.

And those challenges have two-year college leaders not only concerned for their students and institutions but worried about the future of the community college presidency as the sector faces increasing pressures to improve work-force outcomes and completion, according to Inside Higher Ed’s 2018 Survey of Community College Presidents.

Member Stories

April 20 – April 26
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week.

Denver Post reporter Danika Worthington explains why Colorado teachers are walking out of class and rallying at the state capitol.

 

In DeKalb County, Ga., a school bus driver sickout is drawing complaints — and sympathy — from parents, Marlon A. Walker reports for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

 

Member Stories

April 12 – April 19
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week.

In Michigan, a school’s efforts to help hungry students is broadening its reach, Lori Higgins reports for The Detroit Free Press.

 

Kathy A. Bolten details for the Des Moines Register how a college student is using social media to criticize campus administrators for their handling of sexual assault allegations. 

 

The Palm Beach Post’s Andrew Marra digs into questionable expenditures by a charter school.