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Latest Education News

A collection of the most recent education journalism, curated by EWA staff. 

A collection of the most recent education journalism, curated by EWA staff. 

Latest News

For Some Black Students, Closed Schools Have Offered A Chance To Thrive

In Texas, students have been assigned history textbooks that downplay slavery and avoid talking about Jim Crow. In Massachusetts, Black girls have been reprimanded for violating dress codes that ban hair extensions. And across the country, according to federal data, Black students are more likely than white classmates to be disciplined at school.

In Oregon, where Josh lives, Black students have lower graduation rates. They’re also less likely to be identified as “talented and gifted.”

Latest News

More Teachers Plan to Quit as Covid Stress Overwhelms Educators

The challenges of teaching in-person or online have stretched educators to their limits.

After nearly a full year of either putting themselves at risk in a classroom or struggling to reach students remotely, many now say they may change careers or simply quit.

“Teachers have been feeling the brunt of how drastically this pandemic has changed our world,” said Colin Sharkey, executive director of the Association of American Educators, a national professional association.

“The demands that are put on them are off the charts.”

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (Feb. 19-25)
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week:

A team at Chalkbeat chronicles six students in third grace and their experiences with remote learning.

U.S. News & World Report’s Lauren Camera explores the 20 biggest school districts’ reopening plans to see how they compare to the latest CDC guidance.

For The Seattle Times, Danielle Dreilinger examines how techniques developed by educators serving immigrants can help teachers working with COVID-traumatized students. 

Latest News

Missing Students Hard to Find During Pandemic

DETROIT — Kenneth Chapman Sr. was hopeful as he navigated a hulking Detroit Public Schools van down the street, pulling up to a brick home. Out front, there were signs that the girl he was looking for lived inside. Amid the discarded plastic cups in the yard, there was a ball, and on the porch a small bike, painted fluorescent pink.

“Normally when I get to the house and I see toys or bikes, I think, ‘Okay, somebody’s going to be here,’ ” Chapman said.

But when he knocked, no one appeared.

Latest News

Inside a Battle Over Race, Class and Power at Smith College

In midsummer of 2018, Oumou Kanoute, a Black student at Smith College, recounted a distressing American tale: She was eating lunch in a dorm lounge when a janitor and a campus police officer walked over and asked her what she was doing there.

The officer, who could have been carrying a “lethal weapon,” left her near “meltdown,” Ms. Kanoute wrote on Facebook, saying that this encounter continued a yearlong pattern of harassment at Smith.

Latest News

‘Difficult To Split Yourself’: Philly Area Educators On The Pros And Cons Of Hybrid Learning

Nicole Miller remembers crying every day for two weeks after schools moved entirely online last March. Miller, a Kindergarten teacher at Evans Elementary School in Yeadon, said the instincts she had honed over 19 years went out the window. “This is not the career I signed up for! I can’t do it! I hate it!” Miller recalls saying.

But, as the days turned into weeks and then months, Miller developed a new rhythm. She learned the best camera angle for her kids to see how she enunciates words, and created an interactive daily slideshow to keep them engaged.

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (Feb. 12-18)
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week:

EWA Reporting Fellow Janelle Retka of The Yakima Herald looks at the child care crisis in central Washington state, and its impact on young children, families, and the region’s economy amid COVID-19. 

Also on the early ed front, Kara Newhouse of KQED reports on the risk of familial stress interfering with infant brain development. 

Latest News

The Faces Of Child Care: Meet Parent Rebecca Rogers Of Yakima

Meet Rebecca Rogers, a 27-year-old from Yakima. She’s a single mom of two young boys, ages 4 and 8 months. Her family of three qualifies for the Working Connections Child Care program, a state system that helps low-income families pay for child care so they can continue working or pursuing work.

The state pays a subsidy of the cost of care to providers, and parents make a co-payment based on their income. It covers child care for anything job-related — from applications to working hours. It’s a life-saver, Rogers said.

Latest News

Child Care Options Will Be Scarce After the Pandemic

Driving to work before dawn last winter, Valerie Norris heard an NPR report about a terrible disease spreading in China — a pandemic, people were starting to call it. It sounded sad but very far from Rocky River, Ohio, where she’d led the Rockport Early Childhood Center for 34 years.

Latest News

What Infants, Toddlers and Preschoolers Need During the Pandemic

Throughout the coronavirus outbreak, nearly everyone connected to children has raised the alarm about pandemic learning loss. Parents, educators, physicians and politicians — they might disagree on solutions, but they’re all concerned about how the current educational upheaval will affect K-12 students.

Read the full story here.

Latest News

The C.D.C. Has New School Guidelines. Here’s What You Need to Know.

In a move long awaited by educators, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released new guidelines on Friday for how to operate schools safely during the pandemic.

The recommendations, more detailed than those released by the agency under the Trump administration, attempt to carve a middle path between people who want classrooms to reopen immediately and those teachers and parents who remain reluctant to return to in-person instruction before widespread vaccination.

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (Feb. 5-11)
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week:

A team of journalists from newsrooms across the Florida Public Media network collaborated on a project (proudly supported by an EWA Reporting Fellowship) exploring COVID-19’s impact on public education. 

Chalkbeat Colorado’s Jason Gonzales chronicles the struggles of many older students in a state that offers few targeted programs or other supports for this non-traditional student population. 

Latest News

Influx of Unaccompanied Minors Along Southern Border Could Pose Test for Schools

Thousands of English language learners could be headed for American public schools in the coming months due to recent changes in U.S. immigration policy and devastating natural disasters in Central and South America.

Their arrival could pose a challenge for local school systems, particularly poor districts that might not have enough teachers or space to support them. In recent years, several have turned these children away in violation of their legal rights.

Latest News

Opinion: How We Decided to Send Our Daughter Back to School

I still remember the nauseating feeling that consumed me when I put my daughter on a school bus two years ago and sent her off to prekindergarten. I thought I would have until college, when I dropped her off to start her adult life, before I would feel such anxiety again.

Instead, it returned last month, when we got a survey from our public school system in Maryland asking whether we wanted to send our daughter, our firstborn, now a first grader, back to school two days a week during a raging pandemic.

Latest News

Colorado’s Latinas Are Key to Confronting a Child Care Worker Shortage. Even So, Challenges Remain

Fifty-four-year-old Lupita’s alarm clock goes off at 6:00 a.m. It’s still dark outside.

She immediately starts to cook eggs and gets cereal out for her first guest, who’ll arrive in about 15 minutes.

The silence of her home will soon be broken by the shouts of three preschoolers, one of them her granddaughter. They’ll be under her care for the next 12 hours. Then Lupita will clean the house for an hour or two and finally fall into bed.

Latest News

Randi Weingarten Says She Can Get Teachers Back in Schools –

Randi Weingarten, the nation’s most powerful teachers union president, has a message: She wants to get students back in the nation’s classrooms. She spends 15 hours per day on the phone, she says — with local labor leaders, mayors, the White House, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention — trying to figure out how to reopen the three-quarters of school systems that remain fully or partially shuttered.

Read more of the story here.

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (Jan. 29-Feb. 4)
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week:

A team of reporters at The Washington Post cover this year’s drop in Latino college enrollment.

For St. Louis Public Radio, Ryan Delaney and Elle Moxley contrast the school reopening decisions of Missouri school districts with those made in Germany. 

Statesman Journal’s Natalie Pate compiles a list of the 37 Oregon education bills to watch during the 2021 state legislative session.

Latest News

Is The Pandemic Fueling A Rise In Suicide Attempts Among Kids?

Anthony Orr was almost done with his high school coursework when the governor of Nevada ordered a statewide shutdown of nonessential businesses on March 17, 2020. ”

He was looking forward to all of the senior activities, prom and graduation,” says his mother, Pamela Orr. But all he got was a “mini [graduation] ceremony,” with only a handful of students walking, wearing masks and at a distance from each other.

Latest News

Virginia Set To Pass Historic Bill Giving Students Time Off To Protest — Because Teen Republicans And Democrats Teamed Up To Demand It

When Virginia’s largest school district began allowing students time off to protest in 2019, the backlash was swift and partisan: Conservative critics denounced Fairfax County Public Schools for coddling its too liberal, too sensitive youths and predicted kids would abuse the policy to play hooky.

Latest News

Keystone Oaks School District Teachers to Strike Beginning Feb. 1

The Keystone Oaks Education Association (KOEA) has notified the district that it will strike effective Monday, Feb. 1.

Classes are canceled for Keystone Oaks students until further notice.

On Jan 22., the KOEA delivered a notice to Superintendent William Stropkaj of its intent to strike.

In a statement Sunday, Stropkaj said despite several negotiation sessions, the KOEA and the Keystone Oaks Board of School Directors did not reach an agreement on a new contract.

Latest News

DCPS Cleared to Welcome Students Back for In-Person Learning

D.C. Public Schools has met most safety criteria to reopen for in-person learning, an arbitrator ruled Saturday night, finding the Washington Teachers’ Union failed to prove many of the violations it alleged in a complaint about the school system.

Read the full story here.

Latest News

Tracking Colleges’ Spring-Reopening Plans

The Chronicle has teamed up with Davidson College’s College Crisis Initiative (C2i) to present the reopening models of nearly 3,000 institutions for the spring semester. Most colleges have stuck with similar plans to what they had in the fall (we tracked fall plans here), though you’ll notice some differences. Vastly fewer colleges are opening fully online, and many fewer colleges are opening fully in person as colleges move to more mixed options.

Read the full story here.

Latest News

Parents of Remote Learners Have Smaller Roles in U.S. Workforce

Parents of school-age children who are spending part or all of their time taking classes from home are less likely to be employed full-time, in the latest indication of how the pandemic-fueled school closures have taken a toll on working parents.

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (Jan. 22-28)
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week:

NY1’s Jillian Jorgensen covers the challenges and benefits of remote art classes.

For Education Week, Catherine Gewertz and Stephen Sawchuk dive deep into the questions hanging over President Biden’s goal to open schools. 

The CalMatters College Journalism Network shares the stories of six college seniors who will graduate into a pandemic and an economic crisis. 

Latest News

What Happens To Children Who Missed Kindergarten During Covid-19 Crisis?

Many California parents dreaded returning to remote learning last fall, but they did it anyway, holding onto hopes of going back to campus at some point during the school year. But for those whose children were just entering kindergarten, the decision to commit to distance learning was a far tougher choice: Wrangling a 5-year-old in front of a computer screen for several hours a day requires constant supervision, technical assistance and cajoling, an impossibility for many working parents, particularly essential workers and those juggling multiple children.

Latest News

How White Extremists Teach Kids to Hate

Five days after extremists used the fringe video gaming platform Dlive to livestream a mob attack on the U.S. Capitol, a youthful white nationalist logged onto the site and offered his take about the future of a movement he helped create.

Latest News

A Viral Video Forced a Wealthy Texas Suburb to Confront Racism. A ‘Silent Majority’ Fought Back.

Robin Cornish was at work in the fall of 2018 when she got a text message from another parent. It was a link to a video showing several white high school students laughing as they filmed themselves shouting the N-word at a party.

One of the students in the video had shared it on Snapchat, and now it was going viral.

Cornish, a 51-year-old Black mother of five, recognized the girl leading the chant as the younger sibling of one of her son’s former friends. Cornish was upset as she watched the 8-second clip, she said, but she wasn’t surprised.

Latest News

After 2 Educators Die of COVID, Cobb County Teachers Demand Classrooms Stay Closed

Hours after two educators died of COVID-19, more than 100 teachers, students, parents and community members packed the parking lot outside a Cobb County Board of Education meeting to demand the school district continue with remote-only learning.

Two educators — Kemp Elementary School teacher Dana Johnson and Sedalia Park Elementary School paraprofessional Cynthia Lindsey — died Thursday from COVID-19. Patrick Key, another Cobb educator, died Christmas Day after a month-long battle with the disease.

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (Jan. 15-21)
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week:

 For The 74, Jazmin Orozco Rodriguez and Jackie Valley report on a rural Nevada school’s efforts to prevent Native students from falling behind during the pandemic. 

Ruth Serven Smith of AL.com covers young students’ reactions to Inauguration Day. 

Latest News

Rural Schools Have Battled Bad Internet, Low Attendance and Academic Decline Through the Pandemic. Now the Push Is On to Return Students to Classrooms — Safely

As the first full semester for U.S. schools during the pandemic comes to an end, education experts and parents alike are concerned about its effects on children’s academic progress. From the Mexican border to the Upper Midwest, Oregon to Virginia and on Native American reservations across the West, that anxiety is magnified in rural areas, which are far less likely to have access to high-speed or even consistent internet in a time of extensive virtual schooling.

Latest News

Dividing Lines: How Norfolk Remains Deeply Segregated, In 8 Maps

Norfolk’s segregation isn’t hard to see.

The city is close to half Black and half white, according to the most recent Census data.

But there aren’t a lot of neighborhoods where you see that kind of split. By and large, there are Black neighborhoods and there are white neighborhoods, especially in the older core of Norfolk.

Decisions made 60, 80 or 100 years ago segregated neighborhoods by race and deprived Black residents of economic and educational resources afforded to those in white neighborhoods.

Latest News

13,000 School Districts, 13,000 Approaches to Teaching During Covid

What does it mean to go to public school in the United States during the pandemic?

The answer looks so different in different parts of the country, it is hard to tell that we are one nation.

In some rural and suburban areas, especially in the South, Midwest and Great Plains, almost all students began the 2020-21 academic year attending school in person, and they have continued to do so, except for temporary closures during outbreaks.

Latest News

Biden’s Covid-19 Stimulus Plan Includes $40 Billion For Child Care

America’s child care providers have hit a breaking point.

In a survey last summer, 86 percent said the Covid-19 pandemic had hurt their enrollment. Seventy percent said it had driven up costs. With less money coming in and more going out, just 18 percent believed they could stay open longer than a year without some kind of help.

Those numbers are just one sign of a crisis that’s been brewing ever since the pandemic began spreading across the US.

Latest News

UNL Sees High Student Demand for ‘Winterim’ Courses

As the coronavirus upended life in higher education, both at UNL and at institutions across the country, the university decided to offer a pair of three-week sessions to keep students engaged in their learning.

Read the full story here.

Latest News

Trump’s ‘Patriotic Education’ Report Excuses Founding Fathers for Owning Slaves and Likens Progressives to Mussolini

President Trump’s “patriotic education” commission released a report on Martin Luther King Day that equates American progressives with European fascists and says it is “untrue” that the Founding Fathers were hypocrites for enslaving people while calling for equality in the nation’s founding documents.

Read the full story here.

Latest News

Pandemic Teacher Shortages Imperil In-Person Schooling

As exposure to the coronavirus forced thousands of teachers across the United States to stay home and quarantine this winter, administrators in the Washoe County School District, which serves 62,000 students in western Nevada, pulled out all the stops to try to continue in-person instruction for students.

Read the full story here.