Latest News

Overview

Latest Education News

A collection of the most recent education journalism, curated by EWA staff. 

A collection of the most recent education journalism, curated by EWA staff. 

Latest News

Biden Outlines Plan to Solve Child Care Crisis

PRESIDENT-ELECT JOE Biden outlined a sweeping plan Thursday to address the country’s child care crisis.

“We are facing an acute, immediate child care crisis in America, which is exacerbating our economic crisis,” he said in a statement. “If left unaddressed, many child care providers will close – some permanently – and millions of children could go without necessary care, and millions of parents could be left to make devastating choices this winter between caring for their children and working to put food on the table.”

Latest News

Biden Calls for $130 Billion in New K-12 Relief, Scaled Up Testing, Vaccination Efforts

President-elect Joe Biden is calling for $130 billion in additional COVID-19 relief funding for schools, ramped up testing efforts, and accelerated vaccine distribution strategies to help reopen “the majority of K-8 schools” within the first 100 days of his administration.

The proposals, which Biden announced in a speech Thursday night, are part of a $1.9 trillion “American Rescue Plan” that also seeks $350 billion in aid to state, local, and territorial governments.

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (Jan. 8-14)
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week:

Anya Kamenetz of NPR covers how parents, caregivers and teachers can help children make sense of the news and calm their anxieties.  

The Yakima Herald-Republic’s Janelle Retka gathers insights from teachers who paused or reworked their curriculum in the past week to address the Capitol riot. 

Latest News

How The Pandemic Highlights Racial Disparities In Higher Education

Typically during a recession, community college enrollment goes up as unemployed workers start looking for new skills. But that’s not happening this time around, signaling trouble for the economy and individual families going forward, particularly for lower-income students and students of color. This is part of a PBS NewsHour ongoing series, “Rethinking College.”

Latest News

How The Pandemic Highlights Racial Disparities In Higher Education

Typically during a recession, community college enrollment goes up as unemployed workers start looking for new skills. But that’s not happening this time around, signaling trouble for the economy and individual families going forward, particularly for lower-income students and students of color. This is part of a PBS NewsHour ongoing series, “Rethinking College.”

Latest News

State Planning COVID Testing Pilot for Child Care Staff, After Continued Pleas by Providers

When state leaders announced that they would be making widespread pooled coronavirus testing available to public schools, many child care providers and after school program directors were frustrated that they were left out.

Many had been caring for children throughout the pandemic as emergency child care providers reopened before most public schools. After school programs had transformed their spaces into remote learning centers to support students who needed to log on to their virtual classrooms.

Latest News

Refugee and Immigrant Women Show Promise as a Pipeline for New Colorado Early Childhood Educators

As an assistant teacher, Mwezi makes $14.77 an hour but she’s not stopping there. After she comes home from work and checks in on her eldest daughter and Martinode, now a healthy six-year-old, Mwezi hits the books in the family’s Aurora apartment. She is studying brain development, behavior management and cognitive development in children.

Latest News

Betsy DeVos Resigns as Education Secretary, Citing Trump’s Role in Riot

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, one of President Trump’s longest-serving and most loyal Cabinet members and also one of his most controversial, submitted her resignation Thursday, citing the president’s role in the riot on Capitol Hill.

“There is no mistaking the impact your rhetoric had on the situation, and it is the inflection point for me,” she wrote in a letter to President Trump. The behavior of the “violent protestors overrunning the U.S. Capitol” was “unconscionable,” she wrote.

Latest News

‘The Workforce Behind The Workforce’: Confronting Colorado’s Critical Child Care Staffing Shortage

Colorado doesn’t have enough people to take care of children while parents work. The number of children under age four in Colorado is expected to increase 10 percent over the next two years and 22 percent by 2026.

“It’s going to take a robust workforce to be able to staff all of that,” said Heather Hanna, deputy director, of the Early Childhood Council Leadership Alliance. 

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (Jan. 1-7)
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week:

“If there had been a global pandemic back in the early nineties, when I was in 7th grade, I would have been secretly grateful to the virus that got me out of my scary place: the middle school cafeteria,” writes Alyson Klein of Education Week.

Beaumont EnterprisesIsaac Windes covers how educators across Southeast Texas discussed the Capitol riot with their students in real time.

Latest News

Statewide Child Care Strike Remains on the Table as Grants Go Out to Providers

YAKIMA — A statewide strike of small child care providers proposed earlier this month remains on the table, and union leaders say it could take place in mid-January.

In mid-December, 5,400 providers in Washington began to vote on whether to take the first statewide strike in the sector, said Mary Curry, president of the SEIU 925 union chapter that represents these providers statewide.

“More than half have voted, and voted to strike,” Curry said Tuesday.

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (Dec. 24-31)
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week:

Lauren FitzPatrick reports on a Chicago Sun-Times review that found at least 30 public schools are named for people who owned or traded enslaved Black or indigenous people.

After the defeat of California’s affirmative action ballot measure, EdSource’s Larry Gordon covers other ideas for increasing the number of students of color in higher education.

Latest News

Newsom Pledges Aid For California Schools’ Reopening Plans

Gov. Gavin Newsom on Wednesday announced a $2-billion package of incentives to encourage a return to in-person classes for California elementary school students as early as mid-February, an effort that could require frequent coronavirus testing for students, teachers and staff.

Latest News

How the Pandemic Is Imperiling a Working-Class College

Rachel Foor’s grandparents are in their 70s, so when the pandemic hit, its stresses gave her such stomach pains that she could not eat or sleep. She worried she would infect them if she brought the coronavirus home from Indiana University of Pennsylvania, where she is a senior, or from Walmart, where she stocks milk and eggs to help pay tuition.

Latest News

A Racial Slur, a Viral Video, and a Reckoning

Jimmy Galligan was in history class last school year when his phone buzzed with a message. Once he clicked on it, he found a three-second video of a white classmate looking into the camera and uttering an anti-Black racial slur.

The slur, he said, was regularly hurled in classrooms and hallways throughout his years in the Loudoun County school district. He had brought the issue up to teachers and administrators but, much to his anger and frustration, his complaints had gone nowhere.

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (Dec. 18-23)
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week:

The Indy Star’s Arika Herron covers a superintendent’s important snow day assignment for students.

Jacqueline Rabe Thomas of The CT Mirror reports on the nomination of Miguel Cardona for U.S. Secretary of Education.

For The Texas Tribune, Melissa Taboada covers the pandemic’s impact on students’ mental health.

Latest News

Biden’s Pick for Ed. Secretary: U.S. Must Help Schools ‘Forge Opportunity Out of Crisis’

The coronavirus crisis has taken some of the “most painful disparities” in America’s schools and “wrenched them open even wider,” Connecticut Education Commissioner Miguel Cardona said as President-elect Joe Biden introduced him as his choice for U.S. secretary of education Wednesday.

Cardona laid out a two-fold vision of helping schools, educators, and families rebound from the pandemic while also addressing long-standing concerns about equity and opportunity.

Latest News

Educators, Students and Schools Come Up Short in Coronavirus Relief Package

AS CONGRESS TIES THE bow on a long-awaited and contentious coronavirus relief package, superintendents, principals and educators are disappointed – though not surprised – by how little aid it includes for their efforts to reopen the country’s public school system for millions of children who have been learning remotely since the pandemic shuttered schools in March.

Latest News

Education Dept. Gets $73.5 Billion in Funding Deal That Ends Ban on Federal Aid for Busing

The fiscal 2021 spending deal unveiled by Congress Monday includes relatively small increases for aid to disadvantaged students, special education, career and technical education, and the office for civil rights.

In addition, the bill funding the U.S. Department of Education ends the longstanding prohibition on using federal aid on transportation initiatives to desegregate schools.

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (Dec. 11-17)
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week:

Chalkbeat Colorado’s Yesenia Robles reports on an advisory group of Latino parents who are hoping to keep their local school district on track in its equity work. 

Jeff Young of EdSurge talks with students and professors about which campus reopening decision was the right one for them. 

Latest News

Leslie Fenwick, Miguel Cardona Seen As Contenders For Education Secretary

Two lesser-known educators have emerged as top candidates for education secretary — a former dean at Howard University and the commissioner of schools in Connecticut, people familiar with the process said.

The first is Leslie T. Fenwick, dean emeritus of the Howard University School of Education and a professor of educational policy and leadership. The second is Miguel Cardona, who last year was named the top education official in Connecticut.

Latest News

The Dilemma For High School Seniors: Navigating College Admissions In A Pandemic

This is not the year for the college road trip. Instead, it’s been all about clicking through virtual campus tours.

With both traditional high school and college experiences upended by the pandemic, high school seniors are reconsidering where to apply for college this fall. And those who are still charging forward with ambitious college plans are doing so without the resume they had hoped would win over admissions officers.

Testing dates for standardized tests — the ACT and SAT — were repeatedly canceled in the spring and summer.

Latest News

If Teachers Get the Vaccine Quickly, Can Students Get Back to School?

States and cities across the country are moving to put teachers near the front of the line to receive a coronavirus vaccine, in an effort to make it safer to return to classrooms and provide relief to struggling students and weary parents.

Read the full story here.

Latest News

Indiana’s COVID Enrollment Dip Driven By 10,000 Fewer Preschoolers, Kindergartners

When Pike Township opened a new child care center in 2019, it was expected to grow each year. But instead of expanding this fall, enrollment at the fledgling preschool fell by nearly 40% from last year to 130 children.

At the same time, the number of kindergartners in the Indianapolis district dipped by more than 20%.

Latest News

A Teacher at Saucedo Elementary in Little Village Takes on Pandemic Learning Loss

During the first quarter this fall, Contreras had many happy surprises. Her attendance was strong. And even at a distance, she saw the children get more comfortable, light up and learn. Just as when they are in class with her, she finds joy in them.

But she also confronted the academic damage caused by the pandemic. After the virus abruptly shut down in-person school in March, followed by a chaotic spring, it had been five months since these children had been in an organized class.

Latest News

New Data: College Enrollment for Low-Income High School Grads Plunged by 29% During the Pandemic

Across all types of colleges, enrollment for low-income high school graduates declined by 29.2 percent, compared to a 16.9 percent drop for their counterparts from higher-income high schools. At community colleges, the drop for low-income students was even more dramatic — 37.1 percent. This is the first time the Clearinghouse, the nation’s best source for tracking college attainment data, has traced the impact of COVID-19.

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (Dec. 4-10)
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week:

The Capital-Journal’s Rafael Garcia and The Seaman Clipper’s Madeline Gearhart cover a school district faced with newly discovered information connecting their namesake to the KKK.

“Early post-election moves by President-elect Joe Biden suggest he is poised to offer the nation’s ailing community colleges a rare moment in the sun,” writes Greg Toppo for The 74.

Latest News

How Germany Avoided A ‘Lost’ School Year

“Every day is new, and every day is different,” the children sing. But one thing that’s changed little for them this year - their daily presence in a classroom. Germany’s quick response to the pandemic in the spring allowed it to get some children back in schools after just a few weeks. And schools have remained open this fall, even as the country shut restaurants and gyms back down.

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (Nov. 27-Dec. 3)
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week:

With an in-depth portrait of one second grader, The Washington Post’s Perry Stein looks at the high toll the pandemic is taking on students’ basic literacy skills in D.C. 

Writing for Chalkbeat, Jason Gonzales digs into whether the University of Colorado Boulder is meeting its mission to serve students from low-income families.  

Latest News

What Teachers Have Learned About Online Classes During COVID

For this story I talked to educators in six states, from California to South Carolina. For the most part they say things have improved since last spring. But they are close to burnout, with only a patchwork of support. They said the heart of the job right now is getting students connected with school and keeping them that way — both technologically and even more importantly, emotionally. Here are five lessons learned so far.

Read the full story here.

Latest News

COVID At Daycare: Online Preschool Means Fewer Ready For Kindergarten

Cheryse Singleton-Nobles knows her 2-year-old son is regressing.

While the toddler is getting the hang of colors, numbers and shapes, she says, “he’s back to the stage of ‘me, me, me.’” He doesn’t want to share anymore. He struggles to follow a routine and gets distracted by all his toys. 

Singleton-Nobles, 47, attributes this backtracking to the COVID-19 pandemic, which recently forced her son’s free Chicago preschool to close its campus. 

Latest News

Ex-Teacher’s Union Boss Makes Play to be Biden’s Education Chief

The former president of the nation’s largest teachers union is working to lock up support from Republican senators and Hispanic leaders in her bid to be picked as Education secretary, according to officials familiar with the talks.

Lily Eskelsen García is expected to score the backing of more than 40 Hispanic groups finalizing a letter endorsing her for the position this week. She has also strategized in recent weeks with Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.), the retiring chair of the Senate committee that oversees education and himself a former Education secretary.

Latest News

California Fails Equal Education Amid COVID-19, Lawsuit Says

The state of California has failed during the COVID-19 pandemic to provide a free and equal education to all students, violating the state Constitution and discriminating against Black, Latino and low-income families, according to a lawsuit filed Monday.

These children have been left behind during months of distance learning, lacking access to digital tools as well as badly needed academic and social-emotional supports, according to the lawsuit filed by the Public Counsel on behalf of California students, parents and several community organizations.

Latest News

Pantyhose and Trash Bags: How Music Programs Are Surviving in the Pandemic

In 13 years of playing flute, Gabriella Alvarez never imagined playing with a clear plastic trash bag around her instrument. Kevin Vigil never foresaw his fellow tuba players wrapping pantyhose around their instrument bells.

And neither expected to watch their marching band at New Mexico State University play through cloth face masks, separated by six-foot loops of water pipe, with bags filled with hand sanitizer and disinfectant strapped around their waists.

But this is band practice in a pandemic.

Latest News

Amid A Pandemic, A Reckoning For A Chicago Charter Turning Away From ‘No Excuses’  

At Noble Charter Network, the school year usually starts with a pep rally. This year, students tuned in to a video — preceded by a trigger warning — showing a series of news stories about the police killings, protests, and pandemic that have made 2020 a year like no other.

Afterward, in a virtual town hall, Noble’s leaders apologized for past actions they said hurt Black students, from punitive discipline policies to steering students away from historically Black colleges and universities.

Latest News

Europe’s Schools Stay Open In COVID Second Wave, While U.s. Schools Close

When European schools reopened their classrooms in the spring, after the first wave of the coronavirus had crested, some parents expressed concern their children were being used as “guinea pigs” in a dangerous experiment. But to the extent that European schools have acted as laboratories for the world, the findings eight months later are largely positive.

Latest News

Many Parents Concerned Students Are Falling Behind, According To Poll On Pandemic Education Models

Parents of K-12 students participating in hybrid learning models have a more pessimistic outlook on the impacts of this pandemic-disrupted school year than those whose kids are receiving entirely remote or fully in-person education, a new poll shows.

The survey, conducted by the MassINC Polling Group and sponsored by The Barr Foundation, found that around half or more of parents anticipate the current school year will have negative effects on their children’s academic learning, mental or emotional health, opportunities for friendships, and social or behavioral skills.

Latest News

Texas Families Say Remote Learning Isn’t Working And They Want It Fixed

Almost midway through the school year, it has become increasingly clear that virtual learning is failing a sizable number of Texas public school students whose parents decided to keep them home as COVID-19 grips the state.

The disturbing number of students posting failing grades while trying to learn in front of computer screens has also brought into sharper focus the failure of state education and political leaders to prepare for an academic year they knew would be like no other.