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Latest Education News

A collection of the most recent education journalism, curated by EWA staff. 

A collection of the most recent education journalism, curated by EWA staff. 

Latest News

More Doctoral Programs Suspend Admissions. That Could Have Lasting Effects on Graduate Education.

More than 50 doctoral programs in the humanities and social sciences won’t be admitting new students in the fall of 2021 — a response to the pandemic and ensuing economic turmoil. It’s a sort of financial triage to help the programs devote funding to their current students, many of whom will be delayed in completing their degrees because of the disruptions. Suspending admissions for a year, some administrators say, will also allow them to reimagine their doctoral curricula to account for the flagging Ph.D. job market.

Latest News

University of Georgia Grapples with Student Discrimination Complaints

The University of Georgia has faced criticism in recent days from Black and Hispanic student leaders and organizations that it has not adequately responded to discrimination complaints.

The complaints stem from incidents involving crude images, sexist language and racial slurs, the students say. They want leadership at the state’s flagship university to enact measures that result in a better learning environment for students of color.

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The New Order

It was a long time coming; 140 years, in fact.

When Republicans seized control of both chambers of North Carolina’s General Assembly, in 2010, for the first time in more than a century, they quickly set about remaking a politically moderate state that Barack Obama had carried in the presidential election just two years earlier.

Latest News

The Students Left Behind by Remote Learning

Shemar, a twelve-year-old from East Baltimore, is good at math, and Karen Ngosso, his fourth-grade math teacher, at Abbottston Elementary School, is one reason why. “I would try to pump him up and tell him, ‘You’re a good student,’ ” she said. But she knew that he didn’t get enough sleep, and he was often absent. His home situation, like those of many of her students, was unstable: his mother suffered from drug addiction, and they moved frequently.

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (Sept. 18 -24)
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Although some school districts publish detailed data about coronavirus case counts, others reveal little or no information, reports Ty Tagami of The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

EdSurge’s Jeffrey R. Young covers what’s left of campus life for students to enjoy at a time of social isolation and how professors are coping.

Latest News

Pandemic Hammers College Enrollment This Fall, Report Says

A snapshot of fall enrollment shows fewer students are pursuing undergraduate degrees this semester as the coronavirus continues to sow fears of infection and devastate the economy.

The National Student Clearinghouse Research Center on Thursday released its first look at fall enrollment through Sept. 10, confirming what many in higher education already suspected: that the public health crisis would lower head counts at the nation’s colleges and universities.

Latest News

The Pandemic Could Widen The Achievement Gap. A Generation Of Students Is At Risk.

In New York City, the nation’s largest school district, teachers and students of color say they don’t feel safe returning to school. Many of their schools lack windows that open, an ample supply of soap, masks or working ventilation systems — making it nearly impossible to navigate live classes in the middle of a pandemic.

An hour’s drive from the U.S. Capitol, about 27,000 Baltimore city school children — 1 in 3 students — do not have computers vital for virtual school. Thousands lack reliable wireless internet access.

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GreatSchools Overhauls Ratings In Bid To Reduce Link With Race, Poverty

America’s most widely used school rating system is overhauling its approach with a series of changes that will weaken the link between race, poverty, and school scores.

The website GreatSchools is rolling out the changes nationwide Thursday after introducing them for schools in California and Michigan in August. They are part of an effort by the site to make its ratings better reflect how much schools help students learn, rather than things like students’ prior academic achievement and poverty levels that schools don’t control.

Latest News

Some Schools Withhold COVID-19 Information from Parents

Around Georgia, groups of parents and teachers are criticizing what they see as a dangerous trend. Although some school districts publish detailed data about coronavirus case counts, others reveal little or no information.

Read the full story here.

Latest News

Are Colleges Really Falling Short on Racial Justice?

College leaders are talking more than ever about inclusion. Faculty members and students are demanding institutional changes. At some colleges, dozens or even hundreds of faculty members have signed onto open letters that call for anti-racist action and offer criticisms that, depending on one’s point of view, will either seem compelling or exaggerated.

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DeVos to Be Investigated for Potential Violation of Ethics Law

An independent government agency will investigate whether Education Secretary Betsy DeVos breached a law forbidding federal employees from engaging in political activities on the job after her department distributed a clip of Ms. DeVos criticizing the Democratic presidential nominee, former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., through government channels.

The U.S. Office of Special Counsel, which has jurisdiction to investigate violations of the law, known as the Hatch Act, will conduct the inquiry, according to the investigative watchdog blog that filed the complaint.

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With Day Cares Shut and School Online, LA’s Working Moms are Carrying the Child Care Load

On June 23 at 1:35 p.m., Delilah Ballesteros finally sent an email she’d been thinking about for weeks.

It starts: “After many prayers, I have decided that I won’t be returning to work this school year.”

The recipient was the principal of Holy Trinity Elementary School in Atwater Village, where she taught fourth and fifth grade.

“That was a hard decision to admit, ‘OK, I’m a stay at home mom now,’ because that’s not what I wanted to be,” Ballesteros said. “I wanted to be a working mom, but that’s what my family needs right now.”

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (Sept. 11 -17)
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week:

For The New Yorker, Casey Parks covers the enrichment centers that quickly opened in March for the children of essential workers.

Chalkbeat’s Matt Barnum chronicles how we got to a point where the stakes for improving America’s school buildings are higher than ever before.

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First-Ever Report Spotlights California, New Jersey, D.C. as Best in Nation for Creating Prenatal-to-3 Policies That Set Children Up to Excel in Early Education

Only California, New Jersey and the District of Columbia have implemented all of the state policies that research shows contribute to young children’s health and well-being during their first three years, according to a comprehensive new “roadmap” released Tuesday.

Read the full story here.

Latest News

The New York City Schools That Didn’t Close

On a cold, drizzly Monday morning in late March, Santiago Taveras left his home in Teaneck, New Jersey, before the sun rose. Traffic was light as Taveras merged onto the George Washington Bridge, crossed over the Hudson and Harlem Rivers into the Bronx, passed the shuttered Cardinal Hayes High School, and steered toward a big, boxy building in Mott Haven. Already, the city had begun to feel like the national epicenter of what people would come to call the pandemic. The previous week, the city had implemented shelter-in-place rules, shutting down offices, restaurants, and schools.

Key Coverage

Her School Offered a Path to the Middle Class. Will Covid-19 Block It?

A year ago, when Bianca Argueta was beginning her senior year at Richmond Hill High, she felt pretty excited about what the fall of 2020 might hold for her. Richmond Hill is a big, old-fashioned public high school in central Queens, the alma mater of Rodney Dangerfield and Phil Rizzuto, and Bianca was a top student there, full of ambition, part of the leadership club, taking A.P. classes.

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (Sept. 4 -10)
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For KNKX’s Take the Mic, 18-year-old Ukweli Bayard interviews four of his friends about their feelings as they begin their college journey online.

For The Boston Globe, Linda K. Wertheimer dives into the complexities of teaching about racism and talks with teachers who feel compelled to do more to show that Americans are far from living in a post-racial era.

Latest News

In Crackdown On Race-Related Content, Education Department Targets Internal Book Clubs, Meetings

The Education Department plans to scrutinize a wide range of employee activities — including internal book clubs — in search of “Anti-American propaganda” and discussions about “white privilege” as it carries out the White House’s demand that federal agencies halt certain types of race-related training.

Latest News

It’s Not Easy to Get a Coronavirus Test for a Child

As child care centers and schools reopen, parents are encountering another coronavirus testing bottleneck: Few sites will test children. Even in large cities with dozens of test sites, parents are driving long distances and calling multiple centers to track down one accepting children.

Read the full story here. 

Latest News

The Promise

Cities across the country are grappling with an uncomfortable truth: Where we educate our children is becoming more and more divided by race and economics.

In this season of The Promise, we examine school re-segregation by zooming into one neighborhood in Nashville where that divide is indisputably apparent.

Latest News

A District Changes Course on Special Education, But Leaves Parents And Teachers Frustrated

Bonnie Budd is used to supporting her 16-year-old daughter Sabrina, but the past six months have stretched her and her family to the limit.

“Everyone is just exhausted,” she said. “It’s like groundhog day. Wake up, do this routine, yada, yada, yada.”

Even though Budd feels like her family possesses the flexibility this moment demands, she knows they can’t juggle much longer.

Read the full story here.

Latest News

White Professor At George Washington University Admits She Falsely Claimed Black Identity

A history professor at George Washington University admitted in a blog post to claiming a Black identity, despite being White.

Jessica A. Krug said she has deceived friends and colleagues by falsely claiming several identities, including “North African Blackness, then US rooted Blackness, then Caribbean rooted Bronx Blackness,” she wrote in a blog post on Medium. Krug, whose areas of expertise include African American history, Africa and Latin America, is White and Jewish, she admitted.

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (Aug. 28-Sept. 3)
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As schools in Florida start to open, Jeffrey S. Solochek of the Tampa Bay Times compiles the education news from around the state. 

Eric Kelderman of The Chronicle of Higher Education examines the impact of cancelling or postponing college athletics on small colleges. 

Austin Statesman’s Melissa B. Taboada covers the shortage of school nurses and the crucial role they play in reopening schools.

Latest News

Active Shooter Drills Are Meant To Prepare Students. But Research Finds ‘Severe’ Side Effects.

Active shooter drills became one of the most common school safety measures implemented nationwide in recent years, despite widespread fears that the procedures heighten anxiety, and evidence that school shooters, like the one in Parkland, Florida, use knowledge of the drills to their advantage. Teachers unions in February called for schools to not conduct active shooter drills with students. Now, new research adds data to those concerns.

Latest News

86% of Michigan School Districts Offering Some In-Person Learning

According to a study by Michigan State University, 86% of Michigan school districts will offer some or all instruction in-person at the beginning of the school year.

The study, conducted by Michigan State University’s Education Policy Innovation Collaborative in partnership with the Michigan Department of Education, found 59% of Michigan school districts are offering students an option to return to school five days a week and 27% of districts are providing students with the ability to return to schools at least two to three days a week.

Latest News

Life While Black, as Told by One St. Petersburg Couple

For all of St. Petersburg’s progressive bona fides, Tori and Khyre Edwards come home at least once a week with stories to unload, experiences of being profiled, pulled over, discounted, dismissed. In their liberal-leaning circles of advocacy and faith, they find solace and momentum, but also exhaustion.

Now, as protesters march again for Black lives, the days feel heavy, hopeful and too familiar.

Latest News

College Is Everywhere Now

As the fall semester begins, many college students will be attending classes from the relative safety of their family homes. Others have arrived to live on university campuses, with varying amounts of success; even schools that enforce strict social distancing guidelines are seeing outbreaks of the coronavirus.

But some students are pursuing a third option: Renting giant houses with friends — sometimes in far-flung locales — and doing school remotely, together. Call it the rise of the college “collab house.”

Latest News

UNC’s ‘Daily Tar Heel’ Covers Front Lines Of College Reopenings

On the morning of Friday, Aug. 14, The Daily Tar Heel newsroom got a tip: The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill was about to announce clusters of positive coronavirus cases in student housing, after only a week of in-person classes. The student-led independent newspaper broke the news before the university sent its campus-wide alert.

Over the weekend, more news of clusters trickled in — this time at a fraternity house and another dorm.

Latest News

Reopened Schools Find Health Risks in Water After Covid-19 Lockdowns

The new coronavirus is not the only illness that teachers, students, parents and staff will have to worry about as some schools attempt to reopen this fall. Legionella could lurk in the water supplies of school buildings, and some measures to keep people in schools safe from coronavirus may even increase risks from deadly illnesses caused by the bacteria.

Last week in Ohio, officials found Legionella at five schools in an assortment of towns. On Friday, a district in Pennsylvania also announced it had found Legionella at four of its schools.

Latest News

As Hewlett-Packard Can’t Deliver Computers on Time, Cleveland School District Sent Scrambling to Find 9,000 New Laptops in Two Weeks

The Cleveland school district begins the fall semester — entirely online — in two weeks, and in the 11th hour, it heard from a major supplier that it would not be able to give every student their own laptop by then.

The Hewlett-Packard Company reneged on a commitment to provide 9,000 laptops by Sept. 8, the first day of the new academic year, and now the infuriated school district is rushing to find computers for students before then.

Latest News

Pandemic Tests The Fragile College Mental Health System

This spring, as the coronavirus pandemic disrupted campus life for college students across California, UC San Diego sophomore Kayla Monnette had trouble sleeping at night. 

The stress of moving to online classes, figuring out how to safely buy food during quarantine, and worrying about the well-being of her immunocompromised family manifested in what Monnette described as persistent anxiety. Not knowing how many students on campus might have contracted coronavirus, she said, added to her fears that she could become infected.

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (August 21-27)
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A team at Chalkbeat compiled the most recent inspection reports for each NYC school to help parents and educators find out whether their NYC school building had any reported ventilation issues.

For The Hechinger Report, Charlotte West talked with students from across the country about their thoughts on school reopenings.

Latest News

A Perk for N.Y.’s Richest Areas: First Dibs on Top Public Schools

On paper, Tiffani Torres looked like a strong candidate for one of New York City’s highest-performing, most selective public high schools. She had high test scores and excellent grades. “I was a good fit for what the school was looking for,” Tiffani said.

But when Tiffani was rejected by her dream school, Eleanor Roosevelt High School on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, she didn’t realize she never had much of a chance in the first place.

That’s because Tiffani lived in Brownsville, a mostly low-income, Black and Hispanic neighborhood in the center of Brooklyn.

Latest News

Coronavirus Prompts Child-care Providers to Call it Quits

OAKLAND — Kirsten Hove and her mom have been taking care of kids in San Francisco for decades.

Hove’s mother opened a day-care program in her home in the city’s Marina neighborhood more than 30 years ago. In 2006, Hove and a family friend expanded the business by opening sites in their apartments nearby. The days were long, but the women loved the work.

What took years to build, however, was dismantled by the coronavirus in just a few months.

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (August 14-20)
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week:

Two weeks after move-in began, students must now decide how to move forward with their on-campus housing after the university announced undergraduate classes would shift to being fully remote, reports Kate Carrol for The Daily Tar Heel.

For Latino USA, Karen Coates and Valeria Fernández follow a migrant student as he juggles school work, financially helping his family, and the COVID-19 pandemic.

Latest News

Joe Biden’s and President Trump’s Education Policy Stances Widely Diverge

With the “will they, won’t they” of school reopenings as one of the most divisive debates of pandemic America, education policy is enjoying a rare moment at center stage.

But as the presidential election draws nearer, remote learning is just one of many education policy concerns on the ballot. College affordability, sexual assault policies and charter schools could see widespread changes depending on whether President Trump or Joe Biden wins the electoral college come November.

Latest News

Excitement. Fear. Resignation. Welcome to the Fall Semester.

This is worth it. The sentiment echoed on the steps of the student center, outside the dorms, in a conversation between parents outside the bookstore. Tens of thousands of students were moving back to the University of Kentucky this week after the campus abruptly shut down, in March. They bought new gear. They posted pictures of their dorm rooms. The sweet relief of togetherness, after months of isolation.

Read the full story here.