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Latest Education News

A collection of the most recent education journalism, curated by EWA staff. 

A collection of the most recent education journalism, curated by EWA staff. 

Latest News

In Chicago’s Poorest High Schools, 20% Of Grades Were Fs

At the height of the pandemic, even when her school discouraged it, Chicago public high school teacher Anna Lane traveled to her students’ homes to stand on porches and listen to their struggles. Using money she helped raise through a mutual aid fund, she often brought groceries or cash assistance so their families could pay their bills.

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (June 11-17)
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week:

Special education services slowed or stopped after the pandemic began, “devastating” families who watched their children’s skills backslide, reports Cory Turner and Rebecca Klein for NPR.

After nearly 100 anti-maskers packed a school board meeting, forcing the meeting to shut down, a Georgia school district is bringing in more security, writes Alia Malik for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

Latest News

How NYC Has Failed Black Public School Students In Queens

A growing legion of black parents in Queens say the Department of Education has failed their kids through mismanagement and neglect — fueling an exodus out of the public school system.

Fed-up families in District 29 — a primarily black area which includes Hollis, Rosedale, and Cambria Heights — said the DOE has long tolerated abysmal math and English proficiency rates, despite high per-student spending.

Latest News

Pandemic Saps College Enrollment, Counselors Fight Back

Thousands of California high school graduates didn’t go to college last year due to the pandemic. The drop, which mostly affected community colleges, might be temporary, but it showed the need to provide more support for students going from high school to college. A new counseling program in Riverside County aims to do just that.

Read the full story here. 

Latest News

Pandemic Saps College Enrollment, Counselors Fight Back

Thousands of California high school graduates didn’t go to college last year due to the pandemic. The drop, which mostly affected community colleges, might be temporary, but it showed the need to provide more support for students going from high school to college. A new counseling program in Riverside County aims to do just that.

Read the full story here. 

Latest News

Pandemic Saps College Enrollment, Counselors Fight Back

Thousands of California high school graduates didn’t go to college last year due to the pandemic. The drop, which mostly affected community colleges, might be temporary, but it showed the need to provide more support for students going from high school to college. A new counseling program in Riverside County aims to do just that.

Read the full story here. 

Latest News

Virtual Learning Ending For Some Schools Across The Us, Increasing For Others

Deanna Nye is not ready to send her children back into classrooms come fall, even though she knows the worst of the pandemic may be over. Her 8-year-old twins have medical conditions that put them at greater risk, she said, and her eldest son thrives in virtual learning.

But in New Jersey, learning remotely will no longer be an option. “All we want is the choice,” said Nye, a New Jersey mother of three who has joined with other parents to protest the state action.

Latest News

Enrollment at Local Catholic Schools Has Surged

While many parents grappled over the past year with whether to send their children to public school online or in-person, others considered a pandemic-era education imbued with religion.

One example: Inquiries, applications and transfer requests at St. Augustine High School in North Park were at an all-time high this academic year, said the school’s director of admissions, Paul Sipper.

Latest News

A Fading Coal County Bets on Schools, but There’s One Big Hitch
Hard hit by the decline of mining, a rural area in West Virginia is trying to attract teachers in a comeback effort. What’s lacking are jobs for the graduates.

After receiving her bachelor’s degree from Concord University in Athens, W.Va., the 24-year-old English teacher did something rare among her peers: She returned home to Welch to teach at Mount View High School, from which she graduated in 2014. “People my age and older usually don’t come back to the county,” Ms. Keys told me. “A lot of our kids want to go away.”

Latest News

Leveling the Playing Field
College students with disabilities face journeys of self-advocacy

Advocating for accommodations has been a constant, but largely quiet, struggle for college students with disabilities since the Americans with Disabilities Act became law in 1990. The law requires colleges and universities to provide equal access to students with disabilities by providing accommodations that remove barriers to their participation.

Latest News

There Are Big Funding Gaps Affecting High-Poverty Schools. Can Biden Close Them?

The part of President Joe Biden’s proposed education budget with the most potential to break new ground might be the pitch for new “equity grants” to change how education funding works nationwide. It’s an ambitious proposal that highlights longstanding concerns that disadvantaged students often don’t get the resources they need and deserve.

But a variety of challenges, from the political to the practical, might mean it never gets off the ground.

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (June 4-10)
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week:

A plan to give California’s community college system $170 million for faculty is dividing finance officials and professors, explains Mikhail Zinshteyn for Cal Matters.

Education leaders are scrambling to recruit teachers after North Carolina lawmakers required districts to offer summer school, reports Ann Doss Helms of WFAE.

Latest News

How the U.S. Lets Hot School Days Sabotage Learning

Human bodies react swiftly when they overheat. Blood rushes to the skin, trying to find cool air. Sweat seeps out of the skin and evaporates, dissipating body heat. But these processes have a cost: they reduce blood circulation, which means our most important organ, the brain, gets less blood.

“And with reduced brain blood flow, we have reduced brain function,” said Tony Wolf, a researcher at Penn State University who studies how the body reacts to heat. In short, heat can lower our cognition.

But it doesn’t take a PhD to know this. Just ask middle school students.

Latest News

The Bureau of Indian Education Hasn’t Told the Public How Its Schools Are Performing. So We Did It Instead.

For years, federal law has required all school systems to publicly report how well they help children learn. But the federal government’s own Bureau of Indian Education has failed to do so, despite repeated warnings about the quality of education Native American children receive in its schools.

Latest News

Biden Justice Department Says Its Interests Align With Conservative Christian Schools Concerned About Religious Liberty

The Justice Department in a court filing Tuesday said it can “vigorously” defend a religious exemption from federal civil rights law that allows federally funded religious schools to discriminate against LGBTQ students, a move that surprised some LGBTQ advocates who said the wording went further than just an obligation to defend an existing law.

In the filing, the Biden administration said it “shares the same ultimate objective” as the conservative Christian schools named in the case.

Latest News

Indiana Sees 11% Drop In Preschoolers With Disabilities During Pandemic

The number of Indiana students enrolled in programs for disabilities declined this school year — the first dip in at least four years and the latest sign of the disruption caused by the pandemic.

The drop was especially pronounced among preschool children with special needs. About 14,000 preschoolers had diagnosed disabilities, down more than 11% — or about 1,800 students — from last year, according to an annual count of students with disabilities approved Wednesday by the Indiana State Board of Education.

Latest News

Utah Board of Education’s Rule Pushes the Critical Race Theory Debate to Local School Districts

It’s a manufactured crisis, creating intense emotions and heated debate entirely out of thin air. But the furor and fear of teaching critical race theory to Utah school kids doesn’t show any signs of dissipating. In fact, it’s likely headed to your local school district.

On Thursday, the Utah School Board met yet again to debate the latest rendition of its rule governing how schools teach issues of race, equity and diversity, making various tweaks along the way.

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (May 28-June 3)
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week:

The New York TimesEliza Shapiro tells the stories of essential school staffers who worked in NYC school buildings throughout the pandemic. 

Teaching students about the Tulsa Race Massacre and other unpleasant aspects of history could be derailed because of a new Oklahoma law, reports Tawnell D. Hobbs of The Wall Street Journal

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (May 21-27)
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week:

Meghan Mangrum of The Tennessean covers a historic $1 billion “continuity of operations” budget request from Metro Nashville Public Schools.

USA Today’s Lindsay Schnell tells the story of a first-generation college student’s struggle to stay in school throughout the pandemic. 

Latest News

Why Weren’t Black Wall Street, Tulsa Race Massacre Taught In Schools?

One of the worst incidents of racial violence in American history took place in his hometown, and State Sen. Kevin Matthews, who now leads the Tulsa Race Massacre Centennial Commission, never heard a word of it in school. 

“That’s a very common experience of a lot of Oklahomans,” said Joy Hofmeister, Oklahoma’s state superintendent of public schools. 

Latest News

Teachers Suffer From ‘Racial Battle Fatigue’ After A Year Of Pandemic And Police Killings

It took Jasmine Lane five years to discover and fulfill her passion for English literature and teaching — but a year and a half to burn out.

“I have been navigating majority [or all] white spaces for a very long time. … In a state with 96% of its teaching staff being white, choosing teaching was to be no different,” the 27-year-old high school teacher in Minneapolis wrote in her blog this winter. But the abuse and isolation of this last year were too much, she wrote.

Latest News

Should Every Student Move Up to the Next Grade?

Many students have fallen behind this year because of remote learning and other pandemic-related disruptions, leaving districts to wrestle with the question of whether struggling students should automatically move up, or if it would be better for some of them to repeat a grade.

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (May 14-20)
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week:

Nada Atieh and Kristan Obeng spent four months tracking hundreds of students who dropped contact with schools in three California counties for USA Today Network-California.

Chris Quintana of USA TODAY chronicles a veteran’s experience with a for-profit college and examines what critics call a breakdown in the rules intended to protect students from predatory for-profit schools. 

Latest News

Online College Promised Army Veteran A Future But Left Him Homeless

Kendrick Harrison served the country in the Army, and the 38-year-old had hoped the country would serve him in turn.  It seemed like a fair trade.  Harrison had been given opportunities to enroll in college straight out of high school. But propelled by his family legacy and civic duty, he enlisted in the military instead.

Latest News

Meet The Scientists Building A Prison-to-STEM Pipeline

In a Missouri courtroom in 2008, Stanley Andrisse realized that he wasn’t seen as human. The case being fought that day centered around a drug trafficking charge—Andrisse’s third felony conviction. Not long ago, he was a college student churning through sweat-soaked undergraduate years funded by a football scholarship at Lindenwood University. Now, he was facing a bifurcated future, one path leading to a burgeoning career and the other stopping at gray, cinder block walls. 

Latest News

Civics Legislation Caught in Debate Over Race in Education

The lesson today, class, is how to turn bipartisan legislation encouraging teaching of civics into an ideological food fight.

The legislation in question seemed noncontroversial at first, even boring. It would authorize $1 billion a year in grants to pay for more civics education. The goal was to better balance a test-driven K-12 education system that focuses heavily on math and reading with a subject — civics — that has gotten less attention and far less money in recent years.

Civics is critical, backers say, to maintaining a functioning democracy.

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (May 7-13)
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week:

U.S. News & World Report’s Lauren Camera covers the uptick in wealthy parents pulling their kids from public schools, which is further exacerbating the inequities plaguing urban public school systems. 

Temporarily suspending the admissions exam at some Boston schools increased the diversity of accepted applicants, new data shows, reports James Vaznis of The Boston Globe

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (Apr. 30 – May 6)
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week:

Marta W. Aldrich of Chalkbeat Tennessee covers a legislative measure that would ban classroom discussions about systemic racism.

Texas college officials are cautiously planning a return to normal campus life this fall, reports Brayden Garcia and Valeria Olivares for The Dallas Morning News

Latest News

Why Hasn’t San Antonio Closed its Latino College Gap?

According to U.S. Census data, just 17% of Hispanics in the San Antonio Metropolitan Area have a bachelor’s degree, well under half the rate of degree attainment for San Antonio’s white and Asian population. San Antonio’s Black population falls in between, but is also less likely to have a college degree.

Read the full story here.

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (Apr. 23-29)
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week:

A USA TODAY NETWORK reporting team in Wisconsin covers all the ways high schools are adapting their plans for pandemic-era proms.

Trisha Powell Crain of AL.com reports on a summer learning program that is focused on the individual needs of English learners.

The Christian Science Monitor’s Chelsea Sheasley gathers perspectives on the shift from school resource officers to safety specialists in Minneapolis Public Schools.

Latest News

Schools Look to ‘Acceleration’ to Fill Pandemic Learning Gaps

Summer school is getting an overhaul in Washington, D.C. this year.

Schools are designing programs to help students learn key concepts they missed during the pandemic, while also getting them ready for what’s coming next school year. Fourth and fifth graders may design roller coasters, while second and third graders could dive into the debate over who deserves a public monument.

Latest News

‘Learning Loss, in General, Is a Misnomer’: Study Shows Kids Made Progress During COVID-19

Even though the pandemic has interrupted learning, students are still making progress in reading and math this year, according to a new analysis from the assessment provider Renaissance.

The company looked at a large sample of students—about 3.8 million in grades 1-8—who had taken Star Assessments, which are interim tests, in either math or reading during the winter of the 2020-21 school year. (Because they were comparing these scores to fall 2019 and fall 2020, only students who had taken Star tests in each of those three periods were included in the analysis.)

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (Apr. 16-22)
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week:

Authorities restraining children using techniques like those used against George Floyd is commonplace in Minnesota schools, the 74’s Mark Keierleber reports.

Faculty members at a private Oregon university call for the university president and board chair to resign after the latter two allegedly made anti-Semitic comments, reports Meerah Powell of OPB.

Latest News

Black Student Enrollment Lags at Many Flagship Universities

Alarms sounded at the University of Maryland when the Class of 2022 arrived at College Park. Seven percent of freshmen in fall 2018 were Black, down from 10 percent the year before and 13 percent in 2014.

It marked a nadir for a metric crucial to the flagship university’s commitment to diversity in a state where about a third of public high school graduates each year are Black.

Read the full story here.

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (Apr. 9-15)
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week:

The 74’s Asher Lehrer-Small dives deep into a fellowship that helps Rhode Island paraprofessionals transform their experiences into teaching certifications and diversifies the teacher workforce.

In a weeklong Idaho Education News series, Sami Edge explores youth access to mental health services in Idaho schools and the challenges that COVID-19 poses for school-based mental health efforts. 

Latest News

More ‘Monster Walks,’ Fewer Water Fountains: How Two Cleveland Schools Stayed Open Through the Pandemic With Few COVID Cases and More Learning Opportunities

Staff at St. Stanislaus elementary school in Cleveland have spent the school year constantly reminding students to keep masks up over noses, to keep safe distance, and sanitizing everything, including the Easter eggs given to the youngest students.

They even had students do the “monster walk” – walking between rooms with arms stretched out in front of them to create social distance, and placed jugs of water in classrooms instead of water fountains.

Latest News

College Degree Not Required For This Job: Some Employers Drop Bachelor’s Degree Requirement To Diversify Staff

The tech industry is filled with the same type of people who often have the same type of education and advantages. As the sector expands, economists say this trend is reinforcing inequality. So, Ovia Health and other companies outside of the field are identifying entry-level jobs like the one Knowles got and dropping the degree requirement to diversify their staffs and to gain a market advantage.

Read the full story here.

Latest News

COVID-19 Pandemic’s Effects on Pennsylvania’s Education System Have Yet to be Measured

More than a year into the pandemic, how students are faring, and how much they’re learning, has drawn intense attention. Billions in federal aid are coming to schools to address “learning loss” — an academic concept that has seeped into the national consciousness as educators, families, and students measure the impact of the unprecedented disruption.

Read the full story here.

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (Apr. 2-8)
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week:

More school districts are turning to digital surveillance to keep tabs on students during remote learning. That has some families, educators, and privacy experts concerned, reports Education Week’s Stephen Sawchuk. 

Emily Tate of EdSurge explains why some guidance counselors are taking steps to address their implicit biases, and how that could improve services for students going forward. 

Latest News

COVID Lowers Number of High School Students Taking College Courses

Like many students taking college courses during the coronavirus pandemic, Alexis Lopez struggled with a poor Wi-Fi connection and professors who didn’t offer much support. 

“They couldn’t really help us. They didn’t really know what to do for us,” said Lopez, who remembers becoming so frustrated in front of her computer that she burst out crying. “We had to do everything by ourselves.”

Key Coverage

Out of School, Out of Work

In 2017, as many as 4.5 million young people—or 11.5 percent of young adults ages 16 to 24—were neither in school nor working, according to the nonprofit Measure of America. By the summer of 2020, the organization estimated, the ranks of these “disconnected” young adults had swelled to 6 million.

Read the full story here

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (Mar. 26 – Apr. 1)
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week:

Education NC’s Liz Bell shares the struggles of the child care industry that have been brought to light amid the pandemic. 

Ann Doss Helms of WFAE public radio in Charlotte covers an analysis of how funds generated from the North Carolina Education Lottery are actually spent.