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Latest Education News

A collection of the most recent education journalism, curated by EWA staff. 

A collection of the most recent education journalism, curated by EWA staff. 

Latest News

America’s Schools Are ‘Profoundly Unequal,’ Says U.S. Civil Rights Commission

“The federal government must take bold action to address inequitable funding in our nation’s public schools.”

So begins a list of bold recommendations released today by the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, an independent, bipartisan agency created by Congress in 1957 to investigate civil rights complaints. Today’s report comes after a lengthy investigation into how America’s schools are funded and why so many that serve poor and minority students aren’t getting the resources they say they need.

Latest News

124 Sex Offenders Live Near Collier Public and Charter Schools

Forty-seven Collier County traditional public and charter schools have at least one sex offender living less than 1 mile from the school’s campus. In total, 124 sex offenders live within 1 mile of a K-12 school.

The offenders are acting within their rights; Florida law prohibits sex offenders from living within 1,000 feet of a K-12 school.

But a provision in the minimum distance law exempts offenders in two instances: if the crime was committed in Florida before Oct. 1, 2004, or if the offense occurred in another state before May 26, 2010.

Latest News

Dallas Fed: Hispanics Household Income Increasing More Rapidly Than Others

Hispanic income growth since 2011 in Texas is partially attributed to gains in higher education, a new report from the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas found.

The portion of Hispanics who attained high school diplomas and bachelor’s degrees rose by about 1.5 percentage points each from 2011 to 2016, according to the Fed, as dropout rates among Hispanics declined.

Latest News

Texas Illegally Excluded Thousands From Special Education, Federal Officials Say

For years, Texas education officials illegally led schools across the state to deny therapy, tutoring and counseling to tens of thousands of children with disabilities, the federal government said Thursday.

In a letter to the Texas Education Agency, which oversees education in the state, regulators from the federal Department of Education said the state agency’s decision to set a “target” for the maximum percentage of students who should receive special education services had violated federal laws requiring schools to serve all students with disabilities.

Member Stories

Jan. 4 – 11
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week.

Something crucial is missing when the academic year starts in some of America’s largest school systems — a full slate of full-time teachers. Chalkbeat’s Matt Barnum requested and examined data and explains what it all means for students.

 

Theresa Harrington of Ed Source explains a school’s push to boost the quality of students’ writing in an effort that spans every class, including P.E.

 

Latest News

In Many Large School Districts, Hundreds of Teaching Positions Were Unfilled as School Year Began

How many classrooms in America’s largest school districts are missing a teacher when the school year starts?

A small but significant number, according to new data obtained from those districts, though it varies widely. In Los Angeles and Houston, virtually all teaching jobs were filled. But in Chicago, nearly 6 percent of teaching jobs were vacant.

Latest News

Expansion of AP computer science courses draws more girls and minorities – The Washington Post

Ten years ago, girls were so scarce in high school computer science classes that the number of female students taking Advanced Placement tests in that subject could be counted on one hand in nine states. In five others, there were none.

Latino and African American students were also in short supply, a problem that has bedeviled educators for years and hindered efforts to diversify the high-tech workforce.

Latest News

Held Back, But Not Helped

If Domonique Crosby has her way, she will graduate from high school this spring at age 20. To her, earning her diploma, even two years late, feels like something of a miracle.

Latest News

‘It’s hard to be what you can’t see’

The weekly seminar of the Women In Science and Engineering learning community gives female undergraduate students in science, technology, engineering and math a chance to meet women succeeding in STEM in a low-key setting.

Latest News

This Week’s ESSA News — Inside the Dept. of Education’s Feedback to 10 States on Testing, Accountability and Disadvantaged Students

In the past weeks, the U.S. Department of Education sent feedback to 33 of the 34 states that submitted ESSA plans in September 2017. The Department has also approved ESSA plans for 15 states and the District of Columbia — all of which were submitted earlier in the year. (Only Colorado’s plan is still pending from the spring submission period.)

Latest News

It’s Not Just Freezing Classrooms in Baltimore. America’s Schools Are Physically Falling Apart

This week, as the “bomb cyclone” ravaged cities along the East Coast, schools across the northeastern and southern United States were forced to shut down due to inclement weather and freezing temperatures. But Baltimore schools remained open during the first half of the week despite broken heating systems that caused some classroom temperatures to dip below 40 degrees. And although schools closed on Thursday and Friday, the debate over who’s responsible for the inadequate heating and water systems in t

Latest News

The #MeToo Movement Goes to School

When Hollywood’s glitterati walked the red carpet for the Golden Globe Awards on Sunday evening, it was the #MeToo movement that took center stage, not the directors, actors or actresses there to fête and be fêted – many of whom donned black clothing to draw attention to reports of sexual harassment that have rocked Tinsel Town, sent politicians packing and exposed chronic abuses in higher education, finance and other societal spheres.

Latest News

Why Are Our Most Important Teachers Paid the Least?

To an outsider, it was tough to say which of the children’s behaviors were normal for 3- and 4-year-olds and which were signs of bigger issues. Increasingly, classrooms like the one over which Kelly presides are being eyed by social scientists and policymakers as both the place where problems emerge and the safety net that stands the best chance of addressing them. Preschool is often thought of as mere babysitting. But a growing body of research suggests that when done right, it can be much more than that.

Latest News

Under Trump, a Hard Test for Howard University

One morning last February, not long after Donald Trump had been inaugurated as President, but long before many people had reconciled themselves to that fact, students at Howard University awoke to find a bold message written on a walkway of the campus’s central plaza, known as the Yard. Spray-painted in blue block letters, it read “Welcome to the Trump Plantation, Overseer: Wayne A. I.

Latest News

Held Back, But Not Helped

If Domonique Crosby has her way, she will graduate from high school this spring at age 20. To her, earning her diploma, even two years late, feels like something of a miracle.

Held back in the fourth grade, Crosby was 16 years old when she entered George Washington Carver High School in New Orleans. As a freshman, she constantly got into fights, and spent long hours in a disciplinary classroom. As a sophomore, she worked six hours a night at a burger joint in a shopping mall. She became chronically absent and lethargic when she was in class

Latest News

As End of DACA Looms, an ‘Anxious Time’ for Immigrant Educators and Students

As the deadline for the end of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals nears, each week hundreds of young people who were brought to the United States illegally by their parents are losing the permits that allow them to legally work and stay in the country.

While leaders in Congress have vowed to find a fix, a concrete plan still hasn’t materialized—and some immigration advocates are beginning to worry that nothing will happen before the March 5 cutoff.

Latest News

Left Behind?

The Trump administration has reignited a political debate over language and education by doing virtually nothing at all.

The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA)—Congress’ recent rewrite of No Child Left Behind, which was crafted under the Obama administration but is being rolled out now — urges states to test English learners in their native languages. While prominent blue states are already doing so, red states are refusing.

Latest News

A Dying Town

It’s a place, one of many in America, where disadvantages pile up. Researchers are uncovering links between education — or lack of it — and health, and they don’t like what they see. It’s not clear whether a college degree leads directly to better health, or, if so, how. But the findings are alarming: Educational disparities and economic malaise and lack of opportunity are making people like those in the Bootheel sick. And maybe even killing them.

Latest News

The Show Was Supposed to Bring Black and White Students Together. It Almost Tore Them Apart

It was October 2016, and this was the first step show that black fraternities and sororities at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga had decided to do on their own. They took the show off campus, abandoning a glitzy annual homecoming event that had long included black and white students — and produced a program they felt was a more authentic reflection of stepping’s African American origins.

Latest News

Proposal Would Raise the Bar for Borrowers Seeking Loan Relief

The Department of Education will propose next week that borrowers be required to demonstrate their institution intended to mislead them before they can have their loans discharged.

Student advocates say that would effectively mean no borrowers are able to get relief on their student loan debt through a provision of federal statute known as borrower defense to repayment.

Latest News

There’s More Arts Education In LA Than You Might Expect, But Not For Everyone

More arts education is being offered to more students than previously assumed – 89.6 percent of elementary schools–and 92.7 percent of secondary schools–offer at least some arts instruction during the school day to students. 

That’s according to the Los Angeles County Arts Commission’s arts education arm’s recently-released county-wide survey of schools and districts’ arts education offerings. 

The findings were surprising to many advocates, given a common perception that the arts are often the first to go when schools have limited funds. 

Latest News

Reciting Other People’s Poetry: A Dusty Relic or Powerful Teaching Tool?

English teachers say that memorizing and reciting aren’t dusty relics, but powerful levers that help them impart key skills to students: acquiring deep understanding of text structure and author’s purpose; building vocabulary, and finding a personal connection to written language.

“I just like them having the words in their mouths,” said Fisher, who has been teaching English at Mount Vernon High School, an hour’s drive from the Canadian border, for nine years. “The language is so much higher than what they’re normally using.”

Latest News

Baltimore Schools Closed After Outrage Over Frigid Classrooms

Baltimore’s public schools closed Thursday after parents and educators there complained students were enduring frigid classrooms with plumbing issues — conditions the local teachers union called “inhumane.” Four of Baltimore’s public schools were closed Wednesday because of facilities problems but the rest had remained open through below freezing temperatures. Some schools hovered around 40 degrees inside.

Member Stories

Dec. 29 – Jan. 3
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week.

Sarah Brown and Karin Fischer of The Chronicle of Higher Education investigate the link between the lack of a college education and public-health crises in Missouri and across America.

 

World language classes are disappearing from many Oklahoma high schools. Jennifer Palmer of Oklahoma Watch analyzes the causes of that trend and the potential impact on students.

 

Latest News

As Flow of Foreign Students Wanes, U.S. Universities Feel the Sting

Just as many universities believed that the financial wreckage left by the 2008 recession was behind them, campuses across the country have been forced to make new rounds of cuts, this time brought on, in large part, by a loss of international students.

Schools in the Midwest have been particularly hard hit — many of them non-flagship public universities that had come to rely heavily on tuition from foreign students, who generally pay more than in-state students.

Latest News

Teacher, Parents Weigh in on Nude-Artwork Incident

Lincoln Elementary School art teacher Mateo Rueda had no idea what was in store for his career when he wrapped up a lesson Dec. 4 by telling students to look through some art postcards in the classroom library for examples of color usage in notable paintings.

Latest News

President Trump Throws College Republicans Into Disarray

In August of 2016, Michael Straw had just gaveled in the year’s first meeting of the Penn State College Republicans. The classroom was packed, with students filling every seat and lining the walls. Many were returning members, and some were brand new. But a few weren’t members at all—and they were angry. Halfway through the meeting, they erupted into chants of “Trump, Trump, Trump.”

From the back of the room, someone shouted, “Cuck!”

Latest News

Two-Plus Hours on a School Bus: How a Chester Charter Taps Philly Kids to Grow

Imagine waking your 5-year-old kindergarten student before 5 a.m., walking him to a street corner in the city’s Far Northeast, then watching him board a bus for a 2½-hour ride to a school more than 30 miles away.

Then, imagine he endures the same trip in reverse each afternoon. Five days a week.

For some parents, it’s not just a bad dream. Such a routine is customary for an increasing number of Philadelphia students enrolled at Chester Community Charter School.

Latest News

Most Big Public Colleges Don’t Track Suicides, AP Finds

Nearly half of the largest U.S. public universities do not track suicides among their students, despite making investments in prevention at a time of surging demand for mental health services.

Tabulating student suicides comes with its own set of challenges and problems. But without that data, prevention advocates say, schools have no way to measure their success and can overlook trends that could offer insight to help them save lives.

Latest News

Losing Students, Private Schools Try to Change

Private schools are lowering tuition, ramping up marketing and targeting traditionally underrepresented communities to reverse a national enrollment decline.

Enrollment in private schools for grades pre-K to 12, including parochial schools, dropped by 14%—to 6.3 million in 2016 from 7.3 million in 2006, according to data from the U.S. Census Bureau. Overall school enrollment was nearly flat during that time, with public schools educating 2% more students to reach almost 52 million in 2016, the data shows.

Latest News

The Year San Diego Unified Established Itself as the Agency Most Hostile to Transparency

In school board meetings and public statements, San Diego Unified School District leaders speak often of their commitment to transparency.

Last year, when the district achieved a record-setting graduation rate, Superintendent Cindy Marten said one of the top reasons for the accomplishment was the transparency it showed by sharing data on student progress with outside organizations.

The district has boasted of its transparency in managing school bond money and how it reactedwhen lead was detected in school drinking water.

Member Stories

Highlights of 2017 (and Dec. 22-28)
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

We asked journalists to share some of their favorite education stories of 2017. Here are some highlights.

Bethany Barnes of The Oregonian investigates allegations of sexual abuse against a Portland Public Schools educator that span decades.

 

Peggy Barmier of The Hechinger Report explores the budget cuts and uncertainties a West Virginia program faces under the Trump administration.

 

Latest News

As Poverty Rises, One Maryland School System Tries A Longer School Year

The number of students living in poverty has been rising in the Washington suburbs, and leaders in Montgomery County’s high-performing school system have looked for ways to boost their academic success.

One idea that has sparked growing interest: more days in class.

The sprawling suburb in Maryland plans to experiment with a longer school year — extending into mid- to late July at two high-needs elementary schools in 2018-2019. The plan aims to help economically disadvantaged students, who lose the most ground during long summer breaks.

Latest News

Camden Schools Face Influx of Children From Storm-Ravaged Puerto Rico

Elba Ramos, like any proud grandmother, beamed as she showed photos of four of her grandchildren, each smiling broadly in their brand-new school uniforms. She laughed as she showed video of the youngsters, ages 4 to 8, playing in the mid-December snow, the first they’d ever experienced.

But Ramos’ Camden home is a lot more crowded than she’s used to, as her three daughters and four grandchildren have all been forced to join her here after losing their own homes in Puerto Rico when Hurricane Maria struck the island Sept. 20.

Latest News

University Enrollment Decline Continues Into Sixth Straight Year

University enrollment continued to decline in the fall for the sixth straight year, adding more bad news to the woes of financially stretched colleges and universities, new figures show.

The total decline in enrollment slowed somewhat, down 1 percent this fall compared to the previous fall, the new numbers, from the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center, show. 

Latest News

Dangers and Impacts of College Hazing: Research Roundup

Every year, college students are injured or killed during events associated with hazing. Often, violence, heavy drinking and humiliation are part of the rituals students endure to gain acceptance into a popular group on campus.

 In 2012, Congresswoman Frederica Wilson introduced legislation that would have made the activity a federal offense. But that effort was unsuccessful. Colleges and universities nationwide prohibit hazing but struggle to prevent it even after launching numerous programs over the years to urge students to avoid such activities and report them.