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Overview

Latest Education News

A collection of the most recent education journalism, curated by EWA staff. 

A collection of the most recent education journalism, curated by EWA staff. 

Member Stories

Jan. 11 – Jan. 17
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

Talk of teacher strikes was a big education news story this week. In Los Angeles, administrators are trying desperately to keep schools open as more than 30,000 educators remain on the picket lines, reports Linda Jacobson for Education Dive.

Elsewhere in California, time is running out for the Oakland teachers union and school district officials to reach a deal to avoid a strike, writes Theresa Harrington for EdSource.

Key Coverage

An Epidemic of Untapped Potential

Over the past year, the Globe has tracked down 93 of the 113 valedictorians who appeared in the paper’s first three “Faces of Excellence” features from 2005 to 2007. We wanted to know, more than a decade later, how the stories of Boston’s best and brightest were turning out.

Latest News

In Buffalo’s ‘Digital Deserts,’ More Than Half Of Households Lack Internet

The digital divide looks like Buffalo’s Broadway Market on a Friday afternoon: a dozen round tables thronged with lunchgoers – and nary a laptop or tablet among them.

Most households in this neighborhood don’t own such devices, new first-of-its-kind federal data show. And even fewer have the means to go online with them, either at the Broadway Market or in their own homes.

Key Coverage

When You Give a Teacher a Gun

The question is no longer “should we arm teachers?” Now, it’s “how many armed teachers are already out there?” GQ flew down to Ohio to embed with the men and women behind FASTER Saves Lives, a group that has trained thousands of teachers from all across the country how to shoot to kill.

Member Stories

Jan. 4 – Jan. 10
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

In The Chronicle of Higher Education, Michael Vasquez asks: Has Duke University really turned a corner on the issue of sexual assault?

With the government shutdown in its third week, the chairman of the Senate education committee proposes a way out, reports Education Week’s Andrew Ujifusa.

For The New York Times, Eliza Shapiro examines the growing popularity of Afrocentric schools.

Key Coverage

Why Illinois Won’t ‘Ban The Box’ On College Applications

Next year, the Common Application used by hundreds of colleges and universities will stop asking potential students about their criminal histories. Despite legislative efforts in Illinois, most campuses in the state continue to ask the question. Nationwide, roughly two-thirds of colleges and universities that completed a 2009 survey reported asking prospective students about their criminal histories.

Latest News

‘I Love My Skin!’ Why Black Parents Are Turning to Afrocentric Schools

Though New York City has tried to desegregate its schools in fits and starts since the 1954 Supreme Court ruling in Brown v. Board of Education, the school system is now one of the most segregated in the nation. But rather than pushing for integration, some black parents in Bedford-Stuyvesant are choosing an alternative: schools explicitly designed for black children.

Latest News

Why It’s Getting Harder to Count Poor Children in the Nation’s Schools

The number of poor students enrolled in a particular school or living in a certain school district is one of the most important education data points that exists, and the stakes are high for getting the count right.

The figures are used to direct billions of dollars in federal and state aid, and they’re a pillar of K-12 accountability systems that ensure disadvantaged students are keeping up with their wealthier peers.

Latest News

Los Angeles Braces for Major Teachers’ Strike

Teachers and other employees in the Los Angeles Unified School District are demanding higher pay, smaller class sizes and more support staff like counselors and librarians. But district officials say that they do not have the money to meet all of the demands and that the strike would do more damage to schools than good.

Latest News

Major New Study Finds Restorative Justice Led to Safer Schools, but Hurt Black Students’ Test Scores

In one Pittsburgh elementary school classroom, students started the day in a circle, explaining how they were feeling as others listened intently. Some were happy, but others were sleepy or sad.

“Let’s remember those who said they’re tired or frustrated so we can help them out today,” the teacher said in closing.

Key Coverage

Far From Home: Different Stories, With Common Threads

On a bulletin board at Skidmore College in Saratoga Springs, New York, a flier advertised a storytelling event for first-generation students to share their experience in their own words.

The event was part of a larger project headed by Senior Associate Dean of Students Luis Inoa. Inoa spent the summer working with a first-gen Skidmore student to research the best practices in first-gen student support at liberal arts colleges around the country. He discovered that storytelling, in particular, is very powerful.

Key Coverage

District Sends Teachers on Home Visits to Help Get More Students to College

West Virginia unveiled a campaign this year for 60 percent of adults ages 25 to 64 to have earned a degree or certificate by 2030. But in this county of fewer than 19,000 residents, just 38 percent of recent high school graduates sought more education, according to the latest available data from the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission. That’s well below the statewide rate of 55 percent. And in 2016 just 8 percent of McDowell County residents of working age held an associate degree or higher, compared to 31 percent statewide.

Latest News

The Fight to Keep Teachers in Tech Hubs From Being Priced Out

 From San Francisco to Seattle to Denver to Los Angeles, some are spending four hours per day commuting, or have relied on charitable funding for mortgage assistance. And while several districts have tried to make it easier for teachers to live where they work, their efforts are not always welcomed by local homeowners, opening up new debates over gentrification and what obligations the expanding tech sector has to the cities that host its offices.

Latest News

Progress, Policy, and Protests: Teacher Evaluation Laws Evolving Faster Than Underlying Research That Proves Their Worth, Experts Say

If there’s been one constant over the last decade in terms of teacher evaluation policies in the United States, it’s been change.

First, performance reviews incorporating student test scores became — mostly — the law of the land. Then, the academic standards that educators and their pupils are measured against — mostly — changed. And then, in many places, those standards changed again.

So, has the implementation of the federal Every Student Succeeds Act, which did away with mandates on how states measure teacher quality, calmed the roiling waters?

Member Stories

Dec. 21 – Jan. 3
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

New insight into the misspending of $38 million at the University of Central Florida shows the university president was more involved in the controversy than previously thought, reports Annie Martin for the Orlando Sentinel.

For The Hechinger Report, Peggy Barmore reports from rural West Virginia, where district officials hope home visits for high schoolers will boost college attendance.

Latest News

This Deep-Red State Decided to Make a Serious Investment in Preschools. It’s Paying Off Big-Time.

Alabama state senator Trip Pittman had always sort of questioned whether nursery schools were worth the investment. Pittman, a conservative Republican, figured the kinds of things you’re supposed to learn before kindergarten—washing your hands, tying your shoes, minding your manners—might best be taught by parents and grandparents at home. Conservatives often argue that kids who attend preschool fare no better than those who don’t. So in 2013, when a proposal came before the Legislature to expand a state preschool program for four-year-olds, Pittman was on the fence.

Latest News

Trump, Congress, ESSA and More: Six Issues to Watch in 2019

Happy New Year! It’s 2019, which means that the Every Student Succeeds Act is more than three years old, and finally having an impact on school districts. President Donald Trump and U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos have been on the job for almost two years, with no major school choice initiative in sight. And Democrats are about to take over the U.S. House of Representatives.

Latest News

Too few black men are earning college degrees. Can Texas turn that around?

The numbers are staggeringly low: Only one college in Texas graduated more than 100 African American men in 2016.

It’s a grim statistic that punctuates glaring disparities across their educational journey.

Black males are more likely to get disciplined more harshly than their peers even as early as prekindergarten. They’re less likely to get tapped for talented and gifted programs that put them on track for college readiness and more likely to be placed in special education classes.

Member Stories

Dec. 14 – Dec. 20
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

To combat chronic absenteeism on this Native Indian reservation, educators ramp up expectations for students — and their families, reports The Arizona Republic’s Lily Altavena. 

Larry Gordon of EdSource profiles low-income college students who are mentoring each other through the often-challenging first year of school. 

Latest News

Illinois Universities Target Students Who Are Admitted but Don’t Go

Manaja Miller likes suspense and mystery novels. When she was a senior at Bogan High School in Chicago’s Ashburn neighborhood, she wanted to be a police detective like she saw on TV.

“You know when you come to the scene and you have to figure out what happened and you take the body to the lab?” Miller explained after she got off work one night in November. “That’s what I want to do.”

Latest News

Despite Recent Cleanups, Philadelphia Schools Still Expose Kids And Teachers To Asbestos

After the successful cleanup of more than half a dozen schools, and with 38 more planned, the School District of Philadelphia is getting accolades for its aggressive, revamped efforts to protect students from lead paint.

Now, city lawmakers and advocates for healthy schools are urging district officials to apply the lessons learned from lead-paint remediation and tackle an equally pressing crisis: asbestos.

Latest News

As Rochester Suburban Schools Diversify, Black Students Face Obstacles

In interviews over the last month by the Democrat and Chronicle, more than a dozen minority suburban students said they generally appreciate the opportunities their districts afford them. At the same time, they described recurring, insidious patterns of institutional and personal racism.

Several said counselors had actively discouraged them from taking advanced coursework. Others said some white teachers and students use the N-word freely, making them feel uncomfortable and unsafe. Conversations about slavery in history class can be excruciating. 

Latest News

The Color of Education

A joint analysis by The Seattle Times and The Columbian newspapersfound that even though the number of teachers of color is growing at a faster rate than that of white teachers, there are still few of them in classrooms. The newspapers looked at all 313 school districts, charter schools and educational service districts that sent teacher and student demographic information to the state. Last school year, nearly a quarter of Washington’s school districts had no teachers of color.

Member Stories

Dec. 7 – Dec. 13
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

Missed warning signs. Conflicting responses. A lack of empathy. Education Week’s Benjamin Herold examines the deep rift between Parkland’s grieving community and its school district in the aftermath of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting.

Houston has little to show for the millions of dollars spent to improve teacher quality, writes Jacob Carpenter for The Houston Chronicle

Latest News

State Police Investigating Abuse at Celebrated Louisiana School

The Louisiana State Police have begun an investigation of T.M. Landry College Preparatory School, leading a coordinated law-enforcement response to allegations of physical abuse at a school that gained national attention for vaulting working-class black students to the nation’s most elite colleges and universities.

Latest News

Education Department to Erase Debts of Teachers, Fix Troubled Grant Program

The Education Department is releasing a plan Sunday to help these teachers who have been wrongly hit with debts, sometimes totaling tens of thousands of dollars, because of a troubled federal grant program.

The move comes after an almost year-long NPR investigation that brought pressure on the department. In May, the Education Department launched a top-to-bottom review of the program. Amid continued reporting, 19 U.S. senators sent a letter, citing NPR, saying the problems should be fixed.

Latest News

Philly Goes to School; Lessons in Inclusive, Universal Pre-K

To outsiders, Oklahoma may seem like an odd place to look for a shining example of public education policy.

This deep-red state has seen numerous cuts to public education funding over the last 30 years; stagnant teacher salaries over the past decade; and most recently a heated election cycle dominated by the aftermath of a massive statewide teacher strike. But Oklahoma also happens to lead the country in one particular public-education initiative: state-funded universal pre-Kindergarten.

Key Coverage

Far From Home: Demystifying the College Experience

On a sunny Saturday in October, about 500 prospective students and their families gathered on the campus of the University of Texas at El Paso for Orange and Blue Day. They met with representatives from financial aid, admissions, and various academic departments in a festival-like atmosphere spread across campus.

The university uses events like this to make college more inviting for families sending their first-ever student to college.

Latest News

Florida Schools Cover Up Crimes: Rapes, Guns and More

From rapes to arsons to guns, Florida’s school districts are hiding countless crimes that take place on campus, defying state laws and leaving parents with the false impression that children are safer than they are.

Many serious offenses — and even minor ones — are never reported to the state as required, an investigation by the South Florida Sun Sentinel found. A staggering number of schools report no incidents at all — no bullying, no trespassing, nothing.

Key Coverage

Rally Had Minor Impact on Admissions as UVa Addresses Financial Needs and Its Own History

The University of Virginia can seem like a textbook college campus: white columns and porticos, long lawns and statues of Thomas Jefferson and Homer.

In 2017, though, UVa’s Rotunda steps were transformed into a maelstrom as white supremacists carried torches and attacked protesters. For months, the school was roiled by protests and political soul-searching.

Member Stories

Nov. 29 – Dec. 6
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

For The New York Times, Erica Green and Katie Benner uncover the shocking truth of a private school lauded for vaulting its students to elite colleges.

The closing of a Detroit charter school earlier this year felt sudden to its students. In reality, as Chalkbeat’s Koby Levin reports, failure was practically inevitable.

Latest News

Teachers In Chicago Charter School Network Go On Strike

Unionized teachers from one of the largest charter school networks in Chicago headed to the picket lines Tuesday. Acero teachers and support staff from 15 campuses with more than 7,000 students are going on strike after months of failed negotiations with charter network officials.

This is the first charter school teachers strike in the nation. The action is being taken by the United Educators for Justice, the union that represents Acero teachers and staff. The group joined forces with the Chicago Teachers Union earlier this year.

Latest News

Camp Fire Children Face Trauma of Climate Change At Home, School

Before school principal Josh Peete led the caravan of teachers and staff around the police barricade, past the burned fire station, and to their smoke-stenched but still-standing classrooms, he issued a directive: Collect only what is needed to lead classes for a few weeks. Everything else must, for now, be left behind. The team nodded.

Latest News

Does ‘In God We Trust’ Belong In Schools? More And More States Say Yes.

A week after the school massacre in Parkland, Fla., when grief-stricken students demanded action at the state Capitol, Rep. Kimberly Daniels took to the floor to promote a measure she said had been inspired by God, who she said spoke to her in a dream.

God “is the light. And our schools need light in them like never before,” the Jacksonville Democrat said Feb. 21. “It is not a secret that we have some gun issues that need to be addressed. But the real thing that needs to be addressed are issues of the heart.”

Latest News

Hide, deny, spin, threaten: How the school district tried to mask failures that led to Parkland shooting

Immediately after 17 people were murdered inside Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, the school district launched a persistent effort to keep people from finding out what went wrong.

For months, Broward schools delayed or withheld records, refused to publicly assess the role of employees, spread misinformation and even sought to jail reporters who published the truth.