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Latest Education News

A collection of the most recent education journalism, curated by EWA staff. 

A collection of the most recent education journalism, curated by EWA staff. 

Latest News

L.A. Parents Express 5 Concerns about how LAUSD Handled Remote Learning and Other Issues During the Pandemic

Los Angeles families are divided along racial lines and income levels over how well the Los Angeles Unified School District handled remote learning and other issues during the pandemic, a new poll shows.

The annual poll by Great Public Schools Now of 500 Los Angeles families found 43 percent of low income and 27 percent of families of color did not believe the quality of remote learning was good; while just 7 percent of higher income and 27 percent of white families experienced similar problems during the 2020-21 school year.

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (January 14-20)
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Several Historically Black Colleges and Universities received millions in donations from anonymous donors last fall. The recipients of these unprecedented gifts plan to create scholarships for students with financial need, Mirtha Donastorg explains for The Plug

Latest News

Schools Will Go Virtual For Two Weeks

Minneapolis Public Schools will go virtual for two weeks due to a “significant reduction” in school staff available to work because of COVID-19, district officials said Wednesday afternoon.

Students will begin learning virtually on Friday and return to classrooms Jan. 31.

In-person after-school programs will go on hiatus during the break while varsity athletics practices will continue as planned. Junior varsity, b-squad and middle school sports have been canceled.

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (January 7-13)
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“All the books with Black protagonists were history or misery:” Jerry Craft wrote “New Kid” to give Black children the book he never had as a child, but his book got banned after a white mom involved in local Texas politics falsely labeled the book critical race theory. This American Life’s Chana Joffe-Walt interviews Craft, who based the book largely on his real-life experiences.

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (December 31-January 6)
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Public schools are struggling to retain teachers of color, and the problem is expected to worsen, survey data shows. Black and Latino educators are most at-risk for departures due to “racially hostile school environments,” racial stress fatigue and poor working conditions, Sarah Carr reports for The Hechinger Report.

Latest News

Technology, Tutors And T-shirts: How Idaho Schools Will Spend a $440 Million Federal Windfall

Idaho school districts have never had this much money.

Three rounds of congressional coronavirus relief have injected some $680 million into K-12 coffers across the state in less than two years — good for about a third of Idaho’s annual public schools budget.

Most of that one-time money, intended to help students most affected by the pandemic recover academically and emotionally, has not yet been spent. Though, all of it is now available.

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (December 23-30)
Some of EWA members' favorite stories of 2021:

Bethany Barnes investigated one high school’s problematic handling of allegations of sexual misconduct for the Tampa Bay Times.

What happens when the schools superintendent and a local comedian share the exact same name? Hijinks ensue, reported Olivia Krauth of The Louisville Courier-Journal.

Latest News

California’s Unentitled Generation Of College Applicants

The moment had finally come for Kiana Portillo, a senior at Downtown Magnets High School in Los Angeles. She had worked so hard and overcome so much to get to this point: an abrupt move from Honduras to Los Angeles as a fifth-grader, merciless teasing over her limited English and heavy Spanish accent, financial hardship and the emotional void left by an absent father.

Latest News

How Anti-muslim Bias On Campus Harms Students’ Education

For Amna Omar, who recently graduated from San Diego State University, the worst moment came in her freshman year, when a classroom discussion about religion turned to Islam. One student singled out Omar, telling her she was “oppressed” because of her jilbab, or full-body covering. Far from being concerned about her oppression, the student told Omar, she said, to “go back home” because her attire was not mainstream.

Latest News

University of Minnesota Seeks Nearly $1 Billion in State Funding School Enrollment

Hoping to benefit from the state’s historic $7.7 billion budget surplus, the University of Minnesota will ask the Legislature for nearly $1 billion in funding next year.

The U’s sizeable state funding request of $935 million includes about $473 million to upgrade aging infrastructure at its five campuses, $185 million for improving campus security and sustainability, and $65 million to expand scholarship opportunities for students, among other proposals. It’s an unusually large ask that is already being met with skepticism by some state lawmakers.

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (December 17-22)
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Chalkbeat Chicago’s Samantha Smylie reports on Illinois students who chronically missed school due to pandemic-caused problems, such as the death of loved ones, quarantines, and the school bus driver shortage.

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (December 10-16)
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School board members gathered Facebook posts and records on an Arizona school district’s staff and parents, who unwittingly stumbled across the hundreds of files. Right-leaning media and politicians saw an opportunity to spur outrage after the “secret dossier” became public, reports Rachel Monroe for The New Yorker.

Latest News

School Enrollment Drops Again As Covid Disruption Continues

The troubling enrollment losses that school districts reported last year have in many places continued this fall, as the COVID-19 pandemic continues to disrupt public education across the country, an NPR investigation has found.

We compiled the latest headcount data directly from more than 600 districts in 23 states and Washington, D.C., including statewide data from Massachusetts, Georgia and Alabama. We found that very few districts, especially larger ones, have returned to pre-pandemic numbers. Most are now posting a second straight year of declines.

Latest News

Tampa Teens Wanted Their School to Protect Them. Instead, They Say, It Got Worse.

For Rufus del Valle, high school had been a scary place, where he felt powerless. All four years had been marred by seemingly unchecked sexually inappropriate behavior from both students and teachers.

Back then, he hadn’t spoken up, afraid of retaliation. But during his first semester of college, he had become increasingly certain that what he experienced at Blake High School in Tampa shouldn’t be normal. What if he could get someone in charge to listen now?

Latest News

How Educators Working With Homeless Students Adapted During COVID-19

Lisa Phillips calls the last 18 months a “shockwave.”

As the state’s coordinator for the education of homeless children and youth, it’s her job to work with hundreds of liaisons across North Carolina to identify and serve students experiencing homelessness. During the last school year, when many students were learning remotely, some slipped through the cracks.

Read the full EdNC story

Latest News

How Advocates at One University Are Addressing Student Homelessness

When Courtland Hardy saw a thick red packet in the mail, he knew he had been accepted to North Carolina State University.

Growing up in a mobile home in rural North Carolina, he recalled being told that he would never be able to make anything of himself. Determined to prove those people wrong, he threw himself into school, burying his nose in books and consistently getting perfect attendance and honor roll grades. 

Read the full EdNC story

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (December 3-9)
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Freelancer Allie Gross documented on Twitter the support Michiganders gave the family of Justin Shilling, a teen killed in the Oxford High School shooting. Community members silently stood under a hospital skywalk as the parents prepared to donate their son’s organs.

Latest News

Biden’s Universal Pre-Kindergarten Plan Threatened By Republican Resistance

The White House’s proposal to create universal prekindergarten would face enormous implementation challenges, as GOP lawmakers in at least a half-dozen states are already balking and others are likely to follow.

The plan, which is included in the social spending package that recently passed the House and is now before the Senate, would provide $110 billion in federal funding for states to offer free prekindergarten for millions of 3- and 4-year-olds across the United States.

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (November 24-December 2)
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Black parents say their voices were ignored during the debate over critical race theory in Loudoun County, Virginia. Their experiences go back to recent and decades of systemic racism and discrimination in schools and overall society, Melinda D. Anderson investigates for HuffPost.

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (November 19-23)
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The authors of a disproven – but still widely used – set of reading instruction materials for elementary schools broke their long silence and tried to defend their approach, Emily Hanford and Christopher Peak outline for APM Reports.

Latest News

The ‘Terrible Trickle Down’ Of School COVID Protocols

Nine-year-old Landen Sapien started off fourth grade this year with a lot of hope—at first, anyway. His school was one of few in Florida with a mask mandate, after the Hillsborough County School Board defied the Governor’s order that there would be no masking in schools. But amid Supreme Court battles as the first few weeks of school unfolded, his classmates stopped wearing them. Landen says he was disappointed, because no masks meant it would be unsafe for him to go to school, which makes him feel frustrated and sad. 

Latest News

How Child Care Became the Most Broken Business in America

Child care doesn’t work like a normal business. Looking after young children comes with a litany of regulations to ensure the programs are safe. There are square footage requirements, zoning restrictions, earthquake preparedness plans, fire safety codes, CPR certifications, nutritional guidelines, rules about parking and outdoor space, liability insurance.

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (November 12-18)
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Librarians across the country are resisting political pressure to remove schoolbooks by Black and LGBTQ authors. They ignored lawmakers’ requests to compile books, defended their book collection policies; and resigned in protest, explains Nadra Nittle for The 19th.

Latest News

Classes to Go Remote on December Fridays in Detroit schools 

The Detroit school district is moving to remote instruction for three Fridays in December in an effort to slow the spread of COVID and give the staff time to deep clean schools. The move was announced Wednesday on the district’s web site. It comes as the state is leading the nation in new COVID cases.

Latest News

Why There Hasn’t Been A Mass Exodus Of Teachers

Sarah Caswell is stressed about her job every day. The science and special-education teacher in Philadelphia sees things going wrong everywhere she looks. Her high school students have been falling behind during the COVID-19 pandemic, the students and even the teachers in her school rarely wear masks, and a shooting just outside her school in October left a bystander dead and a 16-year-old student in the hospital with critical injuries.

She’s unhappy. But her solution isn’t to quit — it’s to get more involved. “We need to double down,” Caswell said.

Latest News

How do We Help America’s Children Get Back on Track in Reading After Pandemic Setbacks?

Kids have long struggled with learning to read. And then the pandemic hit — disrupting classes, pushing lessons online and ushering in an era of masks, all of which makes it even more difficult to acquire the sounds and syllables that build up language.

The pandemic put learning gaps in the spotlight, as teachers, families and policymakers debated whether the disruption of the last two years will set kids back long term and widen gaps. But even before COVID-19, our schools were in crisis over how to teach students how to read.

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (November 5-11)
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NPR’s Anya Kamenetz and LA Johnson partnered to illustrate the more than 200-year history of schools requiring vaccines to reduce deaths and eliminate contagious diseases, such as polio and measles. Schools are likely to follow suit with COVID-19 vaccinations. 

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (October 29-November 4)
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A Minnesota science teacher introduced her sixth-grade students to engineering, asking them to build wooden tombstones as part of a special Halloween project, writes Adelle Whitefoot for the Duluth News Tribune.

Latest News

CPS Enrollment Continues to Plummet: ‘I would have Never Imagined Seeing this Steep of a Decline’

Chicago Public Schools enrollment has dropped again, this time to 330,411 students, about 10,000 fewer kids than last year, according to numbers the district released Wednesday.

“When I was in CPS my first year, in 2003, we were just under 440,000 students. Even then I was seeing declines of about 3,000 students or so. I would have never imagined seeing this steep of a decline,” new CPS CEO Pedro Martinez told reporters.

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (October 22-28)
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Hannah Dreyfus reports for ProPublica on Liberty University’s mishandling of sexual assault cases. Staffers discouraged and blamed female students, who said they were sexually assaulted, by punishing them for breaking the college’s ‘moral code.’

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (October 15-21)
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Part of a national trend, Black families in Birmingham, Alabama are homeschooling their children due to concerns about educational racism, such as schools disproportionately punishing Black students, Kyra Miles reports for WBHM.

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (October 1- 6)
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Congress didn’t impose many rules or restrictions on how schools can spend more than $157 billion in pandemic relief funding. The result: some school districts have chosen to fund athletic projects rather than provide supports for disadvantaged students, write Collin Binkley and Ryan J. Foley write for the Associated Press.

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (September 24-30)
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Linda K. Wertheimer of The Boston Globe follows efforts by non-binary and transgender students to use their own pronouns, often despite opposition from school leaders and elected officials.

As a California county deadline to provide proof of vaccination approaches, school district administrators make efforts to increase accessibility for weekly COVID testing for unvaccinated students, volunteers, and staff, Kaylee Tornay reports for The Press Democrat.

Key Coverage

For One Native Student At Fort Lewis College, Lacrosse And Family Were A Lifeline As The Pandemic Disrupted Classes

After the pandemic sabotaged her senior year of high school lacrosse, Nina Polk was determined not to miss another season.

Although her mom was hesitant to let her go away to college, the family piled into their car in August 2020 to make the 20-plus hour drive from their home in Shakopee, Minnesota, to Durango, Colorado, where Polk had been recruited to play women’s lacrosse at Fort Lewis College.

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (September 17-23)
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LAist compiles a survival guide with resources and helpful tips for California students considering higher education, including public and private colleges, trade schools and online institutions. 

Jessica Votipka of The Grand Island Independent reports on a Nebraska-based school-to-work program that helps students with disabilities explore various careers and transition into the workforce.

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (September 10-16)
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An Education Week team presents the Big Ideas report, composed of 10 essays focusing on education during the pandemic, challenges, and tough questions.

As Tennessee schools battle over whether parents can opt their children out of mask mandates, Memphis reached a grim milestone – 20,000 students tested positive for COVID-19 since March 2020, reports Samantha West for Chalkbeat Tennessee.

Key Coverage

The Tragedy of America’s Rural Schools

Harvey Ellington was 7 the first time someone told him the state of Mississippi considered Holmes County Consolidated School District a failing district. Holmes had earned a D or an F almost every year since then, and Ellington felt hollowed out with embarrassment every time someone rattled off the ranking. Technically, the grade measured how well, or how poorly, Ellington and his classmates performed on the state’s standardized tests, but he knew it could have applied to any number of assessments.

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (September 3-9)
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A little-known New York law has allowed the state to sue nearly 16,000 students who owe college tuition, library fines and unpaid parking tickets. Many cases end in default because of a requirement that defendants appear for a hearing in only one location – Albany, reports The Hechinger Report’s Meredith Kolodner.

Damage from Hurricane Ida caused school closures across Louisiana, affecting 250,000 students who haven’t attended class in more than a week, Marta Jewson writes for The Lens. 

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (August 27-September 2)
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An Oregon school board is facing backlash from some parents and students for firing a superintendent who followed a state-required mask mandate for K-12 schools, though he personally opposed the mandate, Liliana Frankel reports for the Malheur Enterprise.

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (August 20-26)
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Six newsrooms across the country produced an eight-part solutions-focused series that explores practices schools are employing for getting students back on track.

After two dozen school districts defied a soon-to-be in effect Arizona law banning mask mandates in K-12 public schools, the governor launched an incentive program to get districts to comply, offering additional funding per student, writes Rocio Hernandez for KJZZ.

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (August 13-19)
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Schools nationwide are struggling with staff and supply shortages, which are affecting the start of the new school year, reports Abha Bhattarai for The Washington Post.

A California school district became one of the first in the state to require COVID-19 vaccines and weekly testing for students in addition to staff, Diana Lambert and Ali Tadayon report for EdSource.

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (August 6-12)
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After hearing 70 people speak during an eight-hour period, the Virginia Beach school board voted to require masks for students and staff, reports Sara Gregory for The Virginian-Pilot.

California State University adopted a vaccination mandate for students, but the deadline comes long after the start of fall classes, Mikhail Zinshteyn reports for CalMatters.

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (July 30- August 5)
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Colleges lost millions in revenue after international student enrollment dropped 72% due to the pandemic, visa restrictions and more, reports Karin Fischer and Sasha Aslanian for The Chronicle of Higher Education and APM Reports.

Rather than implement a mandate, several California community colleges are offering money and free textbooks to students who get vaccinated for COVID-19, reports Emma Hall and Matthew Reagan for Cal Matters.

Member Stories

#tellEWA Member Stories (July 23-29)
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After the pandemic reduced college enrollment in 2020, New Jersey colleges and universities hope in-person classes and activities will increase student enrollment this year, reports Claire Lowe for The Press of Atlantic City.

Because a governor’s order prohibits vaccine mandates at Idaho colleges, education leaders are encouraging students to get vaccinated, appealing to their sense of community, Kevin Richert writes for Idaho Education News.