Latest News

Overview

Latest Education News

A collection of the most recent education journalism, curated by EWA staff. 

A collection of the most recent education journalism, curated by EWA staff. 

Member Stories

Sept. 14 – 20
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

One year after Hurricane Maria struck Puerto Rico, students and educators are still grappling with the physical and emotional damage left by the storm, reports Education Week’s Andrew Ujifusa.

In Memphis, a decision to halt an investigation into improper grade changing is raising questions about whether anyone will be held accountable, writes Chalkbeat’s Laura Faith Kebede.

Latest News

How Puerto Rico’s Educators See Their Schools a Year After Hurricane Maria

One year ago, Hurricane Maria ripped through Puerto Rico. For the educators, students, and parents who remain on the island, nothing has been the same since.

In sheer practical terms, they are grappling with lingering storm damage, shifts in school assignments after hundreds of buildings were closed in the wake of the hurricane, and the implications of a system-wide reorganization.

Latest News

How Puerto Rico’s Educators See Their Schools a Year After Hurricane Maria

One year ago, Hurricane Maria ripped through Puerto Rico. For the educators, students, and parents who remain on the island, nothing has been the same since.

In sheer practical terms, they are grappling with lingering storm damage, shifts in school assignments after hundreds of buildings were closed in the wake of the hurricane, and the implications of a system-wide reorganization.

Latest News

Three Things We Heard at a Gubernatorial Candidates Forum on Early Childhood

Stark differences in how Colorado’s two would-be governors plan to tackle early childhood issues were clear at a candidate forum Monday evening.

Republican lieutenant governor candidate Lang Sias, who stood in for gubernatorial candidate Walker Stapleton, said Republicans would focus public funds on narrower programs that benefit the poorest children.

Latest News

Idaho Teachers’ Union Endorses GOP Candidate for Re-election Bid to Congress

For the second time this year, the state’s largest teachers’ union has thrown its support behind a prominent Republican candidate.

On Wednesday, the Idaho Education Association endorsed U.S. Rep. Mike Simpson in the Nov. 6 election.

In announcing the endorsement, the IEA touted the 20-year incumbent’s work on the House Appropriations Committee.

Latest News

Spending on California Schools Chief Race Expected to Set Records Again

Spending in the campaign for state superintendent of public instruction in California is expected to break records once again this fall, as charter school advocates and  labor organizations focus on the race.

Although the Nov. 6 ballot will include races for governor and U.S. Senate, it is the nonpartisan contest between Democrats — Assemblyman Tony Thurmond, D-Richmond and Marshall Tuck, a former charter school executive — for an office with limited power that is expected to attract the most money during the general election.

Latest News

Big Gaps in Campaign Money in All 3 Duval School Board Races

So far Duval County’s three School Board races look like a lopsided battle for money.

On one side, three candidates endorsed by a host of business and political groups have amassed many times more money than their opponents. They say their fundraising success reflects broad support for their vision for Duval public schools.

On the other side are three financial underdogs who say voters are skeptical of so much money, suspecting there are strings attached.

Latest News

Progressive Democrats’ Surprise Wins in N.Y. Primaries Leave Charter Advocates in Limbo

A longstanding threat to charter school growth could become more pressing this year now that progressive Democrats are poised to claim more seats in New York’s State Senate.

More than half a dozen incumbent senators who have supported charter schools lost their primary challenges Thursday, leaving charter advocates without key allies in Albany at a time when lawmakers will have to act if many more of the publicly funded, privately managed schools are to open.

Latest News

Incorrect Data Drives Major Education Decisions

IT’S BEEN A ROUGH YEAR for education data – one that’s challenged the accuracy of federal databases, uncovered discrepancies that call into question major policy decisions and now, with another school year underway, one that will ask states, districts and schools to collect, report and use more data than ever before.

Member Stories

Sept. 7 – 13
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

In a new radio documentary, APM Reports’ Emily Hanford looks at why teaching reading has become so controversial — and ineffective — in many U.S. classrooms. 

At a time of federal “zero tolerance” policies on immigration, students from immigrant families in the Washington, D.C., area are struggling to stay focused on their academics, reports Jenny Abamu of WAMU. 

Latest News

Exactly How Teachers Came to Be So Underpaid in America

Hope Brown can make $60 donating plasma from her blood cells twice in one week, and a little more if she sells some of her clothes at a consignment store. It’s usually just enough to cover an electric bill or a car payment. This financial juggling is now a part of her everyday life—something she never expected almost two decades ago when she earned a master’s degree in secondary education and became a high school history teacher. Brown often works from 5 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Latest News

Wis. Gubernatorial Candidates Blame Each Other for Failing to Narrow Achievement Gap

Wisconsin’s massive gap in academic performance between its black and white students is under the spotlight of the governor’s race as the candidates blame each other for not doing more to address the persistent problem.

Wisconsin has held the distinction among states of having the largest gap in academic performance between its black and white students by some measures and that disparity has only shrunk slightly in the past 10 years, according to the National Assessment of Educational Progress. 

Latest News

Why Aren’t Kids Being Taught to Read?

It was 2015 and Jack Silva, the chief academic officer for the public schools in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, had a problem: Only 56 percent of third-graders in his district had scored proficient on the state reading test.

Latest News

Does Teacher Diversity Matter for Students’ Learning?

As students have returned to school, they have been greeted by teachers who, more likely than not, are white women. That means many students will be continuing to see teachers who are a different gender than they are, and a different skin color.

Does it matter? Yes, according to a significant body of research: Students tend to benefit from having teachers who look like them, especially nonwhite students.

Latest News

The Other Side of School Safety: Students Are Getting Tasered and Beaten by Police

Jalijah Jones, then a freshman at Kalamazoo Central High School in Michigan, remembers the punch of thousands of volts hitting his slight frame. At 5 feet, 4 inches tall and weighing 120 pounds, he was small for his age.

He remembers four school security guards officers pushing him up against a hallway wall before a school police officer arrived and Tasered him. He remembers a feeling of intense cold as if his high school hallway had just turned into a walk-in freezer. He remembers falling to the ground, his muscles betraying his mind’s desire to stand.

Latest News

Will Your School Be Graded A or F? Overall Report Card Grades Return This Week

State report cards coming out this week will have a long-delayed but controversial feature – awarding single overall grades for each school and district.

They’ll also be passing judgment on three districts in Ohio – East Cleveland, Warrensville Heights and Trotwood-Madison near Dayton. If those districts receive an overall F grade, the state will step in and take partial control of them.

Latest News

As D.C.-Area Schools Grapple With Overcrowding, Parents Wonder Why Enrollment Projections Are so off

In Montgomery County, a Washington suburb with sought-after public schools, Bethesda Elementary School opened an eight-classroom expansion three years ago to relieve pressure on the overcrowded campus.

A year later, the school spilled over again into a portable classroom. When this school year started Tuesday , it had four portables and 639 children — 80 more than it’s built to hold and 100 more than school system demographers predicted six years ago.

Latest News

Teacher Strikes Are Heating Up in More States

The momentum from the historic wave of statewide teacher strikes last spring seems set to continue this school year.

After thousands of teachers in a half-dozen states walked out of their classrooms to protest issues like low pay and cuts to school funding—to varying degrees of success—some onlookers are predicting this school year will see continued activism.

Latest News

The DNC Says ‘Education Is on the Ballot.’ Here’s What That Does and Doesn’t Mean.

Democrats think 2018 is their year, and they’re using education—and educators—to make their case.

On Wednesday, the Democratic National Committee highlighted teachers and others with education connections who are running for Congress and other elected offices. The committee said Dems are “running and winning by making education central to their campaigns” and that these candidates “want better pay for teachers and better schools for every child.”

Latest News

Democrat in Okla. Governor’s Race Outlines Education Platform

Democratic gubernatorial nominee Drew Edmondson released his education platform on Thursday and drew an endorsement from former University of Oklahoma President David Boren.

Boren is a former Oklahoma governor and U.S. senator.

Edmondson, a former Oklahoma attorney general, teacher, legislator and district attorney, faces Tulsa businessman Kevin Stitt, the Republican nominee, in the Nov. 6 general election. Libertarian Chris Powell is also on the ballot.

Latest News

Texas Expects Thousands More Special Education Students. But Where Are The Teachers?

Thousands of additional children will soon be eligible for special education services after state officials eliminated an illegal cap that artificially tamped down Texas special education rolls for a decade.

But even if the state fully funds the estimated $3 billion cost of providing that extra instruction, educators say one big question remains: Where will schools find up to 9,000 new special education teachers?

Latest News

Alternative Schools Bear The Brunt Of Student Deaths In Chicago

While many Chicago Public School students have lost a classmate to gun violence, staff say it’s especially common in alternative high schools.

Some 425 Chicago public school students died between the 2013-14 and 2016-17 school years, according to a Chicago Reporter analysis of student transfer records. One in four attended an alternative high school, though these schools accounted for only around 2 percent of the district’s enrollment in that time period. Most of the alternative high schools where students died had a student body that was nearly all African-American.

Latest News

These Firms Are Monitoring Students on Social Media to Prevent School Violence. Does It Work?

To an anguished question that often follows school shootings — Why didn’t anyone spot the warning signs? — these companies have answered with a business model: 24/7 monitoring of student activity on social media.

Often without advance warning to students and parents, the companies flag posts like those of Auseel Yousefi, who was expelled in 2013 from his high school in Huntsville, Ala., for Twitter posts made on the last day of his junior year. “A kid has a right to be who they want outside of school,” he said later.

Member Stories

August 31 – September 6
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

The National Education Association is hoping a crash course in campaigning will help educators running for public office, reports Education Week’s Sarah Schwartz.

For the Tampa Bay Times, Claire McNeill examines why some students of color feel isolated at Florida’s flagship university.

In Washington state, Katie Gillespie of The Columbian asks teachers on the picket lines what keeps them going despite frustrations with the job.

Latest News

The Education Of Betsy DeVos: Why Her School Choice Agenda Has Not Advanced

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos came to Washington to promote the cause of her life — school choice. Republicans controlled both the House and Senate. President Trump had promised a $20 billion program.

But more than a year and a half later, the federal push is all but dead.

That’s partly because DeVos herself emerged badly damaged from a brutal confirmation process, with few people — even in her own party — interested in taking up her pet cause.

Latest News

New York’s Schools Chancellor Is Talking About Integration. Can He Make It Happen?

Richard Carranza is eager to talk about segregation.

New York’s new schools chancellor wants to talk about how the nation’s largest school system is clustering the poorest children (mostly black and brown) in one set of classrooms, and the richest children (mostly white) in another set — and failing to live up to its progressive ideals.

Latest News

Arizona Lawmakers Cut Education Budgets. Then Teachers Got Angry.

Red shirts and blouses had emerged as the official uniform of teacher uprisings against low pay that were spreading from West Virginia to Oklahoma and Kentucky under the rallying cry “Red for Ed.” Just one week earlier, a Facebook post by Noah Karvelis, a 23-year-old teacher in Phoenix, lit the spark in Arizona, asking teachers to wear red on March 7 to demand more money for the state’s chronically underfunded public schools.

Latest News

A Teacher Made a Hitler Joke in the Classroom. It Tore the School Apart.

Glancing at his arm, now fully extended and pointing slightly upward, Frisch realized something: He was inadvertently pantomiming the Nazi salute. Frisch is a practicing Quaker, but his father was Jewish, and two of his great-grandmothers were killed at Auschwitz. Mortified, he searched for some way to defuse the awkwardness of the moment. And then he said it: “Heil Hitler!”

Latest News

EXCLUSIVE: Senator Cory Booker Speaks Out About Newark School Reform, Equity, and Mark Zuckerberg’s Millions Ahead of a Possible Run for the Presidency

Rather than a quick question-and-answer session, the senator talked for nearly 90 minutes about his high-profile efforts to turn around Newark’s failing schools with a $100 million grant from Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg and its spectacular rollout on Oprah Winfrey’s TV show. He spoke about why he decided to tackle education reform and the difficult politics around reforming urban schools.

Latest News

Tennessee’s Republican Candidate for Governor Touts School Choice, Testing Changes

There’s no silver bullet when it comes to improving education in the state, says Bill Lee, Tennessee’s Republican candidate for governor.

“There’s no one answer to this — it’s going to be a broad approach,” Lee, a fourth generation cattle farmer and president of a $250 million home care services company, told Chalkbeat during a brief interview Wednesday.

Lee was in Memphis as part of a 95-county campaign tour, which included a stop at the Memphis charter Libertas School.

Latest News

Texas Has Made It Tougher for Students to Leave Struggling Schools

More students across Texas will be stuck in some of the state’s worst-performing schools next year as the number of failing campuses they’re allowed to leave behind plummets.

The Public Education Grant list gives families the right to transfer out of struggling schools and seek an education elsewhere, though few use the provision. Texas has 1,331 campuses identified on the PEG list this school year.

Latest News

Rediscovering Apprenticeships

t’s not easy for Phil Roark to find the right employees. He’s the plant manager for Eaton Corp.’s Aerospace Group in Charleston, South Carolina. The parts that Eaton manufactures in this large, clean plant end up in airplanes, where they help control wing flaps and landing gear. The work is intricate. Parts are cut inside closed chambers by machines run off computers. Quality control is done by people looking through microscopes. It takes skill to do this kind of work, and Roark has been struggling to hire people.

Latest News

Education a Key Issue for New Mexico Candidates

New Mexico’s next governor will face an uphill climb when it comes to improving the state’s public education system.

While student proficiency scores and graduation rates have inched up during Gov. Susana Martinez’s administration, the state remains at or near the bottom of most national rankings assessing the quality of public education. As Martinez discovered, big steps are hard to come by.

Latest News

Practicing Kindergarten: How a Summer Program Eases Kids Into Learning

The kindergarten year can be a critical one—setting the tone for students and influencing their academic success in elementary school and beyond. But of the 4 million children who will start kindergarten this year, an estimated one-third will have never been in a classroom before.

The transition to kindergarten can be overwhelming for those students and their parents.

Latest News

At UF, Black Students Feel a Reckoning on Race is Long Overdue

In interviews and a 2016 climate survey, many say UF makes them feel their minority status, whether they’re the sole black student in Biochem or they’re assumed to be from the community college down the road. They say distressingly few professors look like them and that they’re treated as the de facto spokespeople for all things black.

They share stories: How a professor mixes up the names of the only two black women in class. How white students see them at night and cross the street.

Member Stories

August 24 – August 30
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

To address chronic absenteeism, schools are experimenting with punishments and rewards, reports The Wall Street Journal’s Tawnell Hobbs.

As The Oregonian’s Bethany Barnes reports, the reopening of a historic middle school is shedding light on Portland’s complicated history of educating black children.

For the Associated Press, Sally Ho examines Bill Gates’ investments in education reform, new and old.

Latest News

Kentucky District Put Kids In Special Education To Get Better Scores

The Floyd County Schools District earned numerous accolades for achievements on state tests, including multiple “District of Distinction” honors, and in 2016, a ranking of sixth statewide, but a scathing audit suggests that some in the district may have been more concerned with test results than the quality of education provided to students.
 

The Kentucky Department of Education required the school district to implement a corrective action plan this year, following an audit of the district’s services for children with special needs.

Latest News

For-Profit Colleges Leave Students Swimming in Debt

For many students, the path toward enrolling in a for-profit college starts with an advertisement—maybe while browsing online or watching a favorite television show. Either way, the message is usually the same: Get off the couch and do something with your life.

Latest News

Middle Schools Face Concentrated Poverty and Gaps in Opportunity, Report Finds

As New York City’s middle schools emerge as the focus of desegregation attempts, a report released Wednesday highlights just how much work there is to be done.

About a third of the city’s roughly 600 middle schools serve overwhelmingly poor students, and more than half of the city’s low-income adolescents are clustered in just a quarter of middle schools, according to the study from the New York City Independent Budget Office.

Latest News

Thousands Of Southwest Washington Teachers Strike

All summer, teachers and school administrators in southwest Washington have been in contract negotiations to avoid widespread strikes.

But now those strikes are happening. A regionwide teacher strike is disrupting the start of school for the more than 78,000 students in the area, and it’s unclear how long it could last.

Nearly every school district in Clark County has delayed the start of school and is on strike, with the exception of Woodland Public Schools where teachers bargained a 22.82 percent increase in base salary.