Latest News

Overview Rick Wilson

Latest Education News

A collection of the most recent education journalism, curated by EWA staff. 

A collection of the most recent education journalism, curated by EWA staff. 

Member Stories Erik Robelen

Aug 9 – Aug 15
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

For APM Reports, Chris Julin examines the challenges facing the country’s growing number of homeless students.

As the LeBron James-affiliated I Promise School enters its second year, leaders look to build on their success while feeling pressure to meet high expectations, reports Jennifer Pignolet of the Akron Beacon Journal/Ohio.com

Latest News Lori Crouch

The Children In The Fields

Under federal law, children of any age can work on farms operated by their parents, and kids as young as 10 can be hired to work on farms not operated by their relatives during short-term harvests. At age 12, kids can begin working nonhazardous farm jobs outside school hours with parental permission. And at 16, they can do any job on a farm regardless of the risks. That’s at least two years younger than other industries.

Latest News Allison Kowalski

Kentucky Teacher Shortage: Are ‘Thousands’ of Jobs Actually Vacant?

Kentucky Education Commissioner Wayne Lewis has in recent weeks drawn attention to a statewide teacher shortage, warning that thousands of instructional vacancies could be putting student learning at risk.

But reports of an immediate crisis are overblown, a Courier Journal review has found.

Latest News DLoewenberg@ewa.org

A New Study Questions Whether Head Start Still Produces Long-Run Gains Seen in Past Research

A raft of research has shown that children see benefits even many years later from attending early childhood programs like the Perry preschool initiative and federally funded Head Start. 

That’s why a new study comes a surprise. When researchers used similar methods as Deming to look at students born later, mostly between 1986 and 1996, they found that Head Start provided no clear long-term benefits. If anything, the program led to somewhat worse outcomes. 

Member Stories Erik Robelen

Aug 2 – Aug 8
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

For NJ Advance Media, Kelly Heyboer and Adam Clark reveal how a web of red tape allows some teachers to work for years after they have been accused of serious misconduct.

A school in Georgia is under fire for a policy prohibiting hairstyles popular among black students, reports Marlon A. Walker for The Atlanta-Journal Constitution

Latest News Lori Crouch

Anatomy Of A Failure: How An XQ Super School Flopped

Alec Resnick and Shaunalynn Duffy stood in Somerville City Hall at about 6:30 on March 18, a night they hoped would launch the next chapter of their lives. The two had spent nearly seven years designing a new kind of high school meant to address the needs of students who didn’t thrive in a traditional setting. They’d developed a projects-driven curriculum that would give students nearly unprecedented control over what they would learn, in a small, supportive environment.

Latest News Allison Kowalski

Students ‘Were the Victims’: End of the Transfer Program Highlights Inequality In St. Louis Area Schools

The 2015 Ferguson Commission report called on the state to overhaul the school accreditation system to address racial and income inequity. It said the transfer system “fail(s) to fix the schools that have lost accreditation or to address the core issues that led to losing accreditation” because it sends “motivated students and money away.”

Latest News Allison Kowalski

As White Supremacists Try to Remake History, Scholars Seek to Preserve the Record

In the wake of yet another mass shooting, committed by yet another radicalized young white man, scholars are repeating a call to action that has been issued during the Trump presidency: White supremacists are distorting history. It’s the job of experts, who know better, to push back.

Latest News Lori Crouch

Debate Raging At City Colleges Of Chicago Over ESL Classes

Jose Lorenzo earned his bachelor’s degree from Roosevelt University this spring after moving here from Mexico four years ago without speaking much English. Last week, he made his way back to where his education in the United States began: Daley College on Chicago’s far Southwest Side.

He took English classes there when he first moved to Chicago. It was in those English classes where he polished the basics and, in advanced classes, learned how to write five paragraph essays and read books like Charlotte’s Web.

Latest News Lori Crouch

Michigan To Have Two Separate Accountability Systems For Schools

Michigan will have two separate accountability systems for its K-12 schools, which is the result of lame-duck legislation conflicting with federal education law.

Michigan already had an accountability system in place under the Every Student Succeeds Act when state lawmakers in December passed a new state A-F accountability system in the early morning hours of a lame-duck session.

Member Stories DLoewenberg@ewa.org

July 26 – Aug 1
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

Amid a national discussion on desegregation, Jefferson County Public Schools may have found a model that balances diversity with equitable school choice, reports Olivia Krauth for Insider Louisville.

With changes to Title IX looming at the federal level, students at the University of Nebraska are pushing for reforms locally, reports Chris Dunker for the Lincoln Journal Star.

Latest News Emily Richmond

Segregation of Latino Students From White Peers Increased Over a Generation, Study Finds

In 1998, the average Latino elementary school student attended a school where 40 percent of her classmates were white. But by 2015, the average young Latino student was attending a school with a student body of only 30 percent white students, demonstrating an increased level of ethnic segregation, according to a new analysis of student data. One factor is the growing share of Latino students among the elementary-school population, the study notes.

Latest News Emily Richmond

500,000 Children Could Lose Free School Meals Under Trump Administration Proposal

More than 500,000 children would lose automatic eligibility for free school meals under a rule proposed last week by the Agriculture Department intended to tighten access to food stamps. The impact on school meals, revealed by Representative Robert C. Scott, Democrat of Virginia and the chairman of the House Committee on Education and Labor, was not disclosed when the proposed food stamp rule was published last week. Agriculture officials said the new rule would close a loophole that they said allowed people with high incomes and accumulated assets to receive food stamps.

Latest News Allison Kowalski

Parents Are Giving Up Custody of Their Kids to Get Need-Based College Financial Aid

Parents are giving up legal guardianship of their children during their junior or senior year in high school to someone else — a friend, aunt, cousin or grandparent. The guardianship status then allows the students to declare themselves financially independent of their families so they can qualify for federal, state and university aid, a ProPublica Illinois investigation found.

Member Stories DLoewenberg@ewa.org

July 19 – July 25
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

Can increasing teachers’ pay solve the problem of teacher shortages? For The Atlanta Journal Constitution, Marlon A. Walker explains why there’s reason to be skeptical.

In The Chronicle of Higher Education, Eric Kelderman and Dan Bauman detail how a series of missteps have led one university to the brink of financial ruin.

Latest News Lori Crouch

How Pittsburgh Students Have Fared Since The Atlanta Cheating Scandal

Over the past decade, the Atlanta Public Schools cheating scandal devastated Pittsburgh. The community’s schools were at the epicenter, so much so that one will be the focus of a forthcoming Hollywood movie. For a proud South Atlanta community once home to one of the city’s best schools for black children, the memory of teachers marched out of school by police still stings.

Member Stories DLoewenberg@ewa.org

July 12 – July 18
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

Long a poster child for America’s prison problems, California’s prison system has developed a promising new educational approach that may serve as a blueprint for other states, reports Wayne D’Orio for The Hechinger Report.

In an investigation for EdSurge, Emily Tate examines a disturbing side of the thriving online English-tutoring market.

Latest News Emily Richmond

Trump Picked the Perfect Education Secretary in Betsy DeVos

For all the years since Jimmy Carter picked Shirley Hufstedler in 1979 to be the first holder of the title, it’s been a tradition for the U.S. education secretary to address the annual gathering of the hundreds of journalists covering their department. Two years ago, Betsy DeVos, who’d recently been confirmed as President Donald Trump’s education secretary, turned down an invitation from the Education Writers Association. The next year she did so again, raising the possibility that she might be the first person with the job to snub the organization altogether in almost 40 years.

Member Stories DLoewenberg@ewa.org

June 28 – July 11
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

For The Washington Post, Jessica Contrera chronicles a hate crime at a Maryland high school, and the emotional reckoning that followed. 

Latino children make up nearly half of Boston’s public school students, yet the collective voice of their parents does not loom large in the system, reports Bianca Vázquez Toness for WGBH.

Latest News Lori Crouch

After Biting Report, Providence Looks to Lift Failing School District

Brown tap water. Student brawls. Chronically absent teachers. Test scores that rank among the worst in the country.

The public school district here is full of deplorable conditions, according to a recent scathing report by the Johns Hopkins Institute for Education Policy. Now the capital city, proud of its downtown renaissance, restaurants and arts scene, faces a painful reckoning as it is debating what to do with a failing school system that serves 24,000 children, who are mostly poor and Hispanic.

Latest News Allison Kowalski

Study: When ICE and Local Police Cooperate on Immigration Enforcement, Hispanic Student Enrollment Drops

MORE THAN 300,000 Hispanic students have been displaced from K-12 schools in communities where local police have forged partnerships with Immigration and Customs Enforcement officers to better enforce immigration laws, according to a new study from researchers at Stanford University.

Member Stories DLoewenberg@ewa.org

June 21 – June 27
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

For NOLA.com and The Times Picayune, Wilborn Nobles III explores the complex state of school discipline reform in New Orleans where expulsions are down but suspensions are up. 

In project that took him from Oklahoma to England — and supported in part by an EWA Reporting Fellowship –  Ben Felder explores the promise of higher education programs in prisons in a series for The Oklahoman

Latest News Allison Kowalski

‘No Exceptions, No Questions Asked’: Progressives Propose Legislation Canceling All Student-Loan Debt

Sen. Bernie Sanders and Rep. Ilhan Omar on Monday proposed legislation to cancel all federal and private student-loan debt, carried by about 45 million Americans.

Sanders’s proposal also calls for free tuition and fees at two- and four-year public colleges, and $1.3 billion a year to support students at historically black colleges and universities. Sanders, a Vermont Independent, proposed paying for the plan through taxes on Wall Street transactions in stocks, bonds, and derivatives.

Member Stories Allison Kowalski

June 14 – June 20
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

The nation’s seventh-largest school district is embarking on a massive effort to address students’ challenges outside the classroom, reports Jacob Carpenter for the Houston Chronicle.

For The Christian Science Monitor, Stacy Teicher Khadaroo examines a historic vote at Georgetown University and what it reveals about the national dialogue over a call for reparations for slavery.

Latest News Swati Guin

Immigrants Brought Riches to Urban Schools. Now They’re in the Shadows.

The influx of poor immigrant families brought a flood of resources as the school’s official poverty rate rose above 90 percent: an after-school program, three interpreters and a steady infusion of federal funding.

But in recent years, as the Trump administration’s immigration crackdown began to reverberate through the nation’s public schools, the students who had been such a fiscal asset have turned into a budgetary liability. 

Member Stories Emily Richmond

June 7 – June 13
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

A plan to close a predominantly black high school in Michigan is unfolding as the first crisis of Gretchen Whitmer’s governorship, writes Jennifer Chambers for The Detroit News.

The Rivard Report’s Emily Donaldson examines how a lack of paid maternity leave can create challenges for Texas teachers planning a family.

Latest News Allison Kowalski

Senator Offers Legislation to Respond to Admissions Scandal

Donations — many of them anything but charitable — are at the heart of the admissions scandal. Using a sham foundation, parents paid off coaches, in part with donations to their programs. Then the donors’ sons and daughters ended up on lists of recruited athletes, easing their admission to competitive colleges. Everything was fake. The foundation was a tool for money laundering.

Latest News DLoewenberg@ewa.org

Educators Worry a Census Citizenship Question Would Lead to Less Funding

The anticipated undercount of people and poverty, driven by the reluctance of immigrant communities and Hispanic households to complete the census if the citizenship question is included, is expected to have a devastating impact on federal K-12 funding for school districts that serve the most vulnerable students.

Ahead of the high court’s decision, educators across the country are bracing themselves for billions of dollars in critical resources that could be lost and they’re scrambling to develop ways to minimize the undercount.

Member Stories DLoewenberg@ewa.org

May 31 – June 6
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

Despite privacy concerns, America’s schools are increasingly monitoring students’ online lives, reports Education Week’s Benjamin Herold.

WAMU’s Jenny Abamu continues exploring schools’ use of restraint and seclusion, and why it often goes unreported.

For USA Today, Erin Richards and Matt Wynn examine how teachers’ salaries stack up to the cost of living in cities across the country.

Latest News Emily Richmond

Baltimore Redux: Students Bring Positive Perspective To City’s Story

Ma’kayla Hill rocks on her pink and white sneakers as she presents her poster. On one side, her stick-figure cartoons depict the way people often see Baltimore: A man shoots a boy who owes him money; the victim’s sister runs to get their mother; her speech bubble reads, “OMG My Son.” “But my perspective of Baltimore City is everyone having fun … at our friend’s house or at a playground,” the eighth-grader says, pointing to the other side, with drawings of kids on swings. “Baltimore can be a wonderful place once we all come together.” 

Latest News Emily Richmond

How Democrats Got Radical on the Cost of College

The presidential-election cycle has barely begun but one thing is already clear: The Democratic candidates want to talk about student debt. No surprise there; the trillion-dollar student-loan bubble has captured the national imagination in ways few higher-education issues have, and candidates are essentially obligated to have a plan to address it.

Latest News Emily Richmond

Washington Was One Of The Last States To Require High School-exit Exams. Now Seniors Can Apply For A Waiver To Graduate On Time.

Washington has remained one of just a dozen states that require students to pass high-stakes exams to earn a high-school diploma. That’s about to change: Starting with the class of 2020, high schoolers will no longer have to clear the standardized tests to graduate on time.

Latest News Allison Kowalski

Report: Teacher Mindsets: How Educators’ Perspectives Shape Student Success

This report explores the critical importance of “teacher mindsets,” or teachers’ attitudes, beliefs, and practices, in fortifying students’ investment in learning. We profile several schools in the forefront of that work, schools that have begun to use the new findings on teacher mindsets to shift adult belief and behaviors in ways that strengthen students’ view of themselves as learners and their motivation to learn.

Latest News Allison Kowalski

Another Way Wealthy Parents Game College Admissions: Extra Time On The SAT and ACT

Wealthy parents illegally paying bribes so their kids could get extra time to take the SAT or ACT exam is a central part of the college admissions scandal. And while what Caplan and other accused parents did is illegal, higher education analysts say students living in affluent, suburban towns like Greenwich are much more likely to get extra time — legally. In 2011, The College Board, the nonprofit that runs the SAT, received 80,000 requests for extended time. Five years later, that number doubled to 160,000.

Latest News Allison Kowalski

Black Students in Charter Schools Are More Likely to Have Black Teachers

Black students in charter schools are more likely to have black teachers than their peers in traditional public schools, which can lead to academic gains in math, a new study shows. 

The study published by the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, a right-leaning think tank that also authorizes charter schools in Ohio, examined data from grades 3 to 5 in North Carolina’s traditional and charter public schools, from 2006-07 through 2012-13.