Hewlett 20-21

Webinar

Online Learning Will Continue This Fall. What Do Reporters Need to Know?

Online Learning Will Continue This Fall. What Do Reporters Need to Know?

Although school districts nationwide are expected to offer full-time, in-person instruction during the 2021-22 academic year, millions of students are poised to stick with online learning, with the number of virtual options growing. This raises a host of important questions for families, communities, and educators.

Watch the Education Writers Association’s timely webinar on remote learning. Experts identified critical questions education reporters should be asking in their local communities and provided some early answers.

Webinar

Brain Waves: Covering How the Science of Learning Translates to the Classroom

 Brain Waves: Covering How the Science of Learning Translates to the Classroom

Cognitive science has vastly expanded the body of knowledge on how people learn in the last 25 years. Yet, little of that knowledge has trickled down to the classroom. 

A small, but growing, number of schools and districts are working to change that. More educators are looking at the science of learning after concerns expressed about learning disruptions and recovering from the pandemic. To learn more, watch the webinar recording below.

Webinar

Critical Race Theory 101: Essential Context for Education Reporters

Critical Race Theory 101: Essential Context for Education Reporters

Legislation banning the teaching of “critical race theory” in schools and colleges is being advanced in statehouses all over the country. Lawmakers sponsoring these policies claim that such teaching is divisive, racist, and psychologically distressing. Opponents say that this is a manufactured misinformation campaign intended to chill teacher speech and limit educators’ ability to teach about race and racism.

Multimedia

What Pandemic-Driven Changes in Education Will Last, and Why?

Education will never be the same again. Or will it? 

COVID-19 disrupted business as usual in the K-12 and postsecondary domains, from the delivery of instruction to testing, parent-teacher conferences, college admissions and financial aid. 

To what extent will changes sparked or accelerated by the pandemic have staying power? What are the implications for educational equity?

Several experts tackled these questions and more during a May 4 session at the Education Writers Association’s 2021 National Seminar.

The participants were:

  • Daniel Domenech, AASA: The School Superintendents Association
  • Joshua Kim, Dartmouth College
  • Robin Lake, Center on Reinventing Public Education
  • Robert Vela, San Antonio College
  • Erica Green, The New York Times (Moderator)

What Pandemic-Driven Changes in Education Will Last, and Why?

Webinar

Will the Pandemic Propel ‘Competency-Based’ Education Into the Mainstream?
Instructional model replaces 'seat-time' requirements with focus on mastery of content, skills

Will the Pandemic Propel ‘Competency-Based’ Education Into the Mainstream?

The pandemic forced schools to switch from in-person to remote learning nearly overnight, raising questions about the relevance of “seat time” as a standard measure for earning course credit. Now, as schools move into education recovery mode, an alternative model known as competency-based learning is getting a fresh look and is expected to see more widespread adoption.

Blog: The Educated Reporter

Miguel Cardona’s Education Priorities: Addressing Disparities, Student Loans, Pre-K and More

Miguel Cardona

U.S. Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona made his priorities clear at the Education Writers Association’s 2021 National Seminar. 

Cardona vowed to “unapologetically address achievement disparities” and urge all schools to reopen for in-person learning during the wide-ranging conversation on May 3.

Blog

Miguel Cardona: Why Schools Should Reopen Fully and Train Their Police Officers Better
What education reporters can expect from the Biden administration

Public schools that don’t offer full-time, in-person learning for students five days a week next fall risk intervention from the U.S. Education Department.

U.S. Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona shared this message with journalists, just two months after his Senate confirmation, during the Education Writers Association’s 2021 National Seminar. 

Webinar

A Reporter’s Guide to Covering Hybrid Teaching & Learning

A Reporter’s Guide to Covering Hybrid Teaching & Learning

As the pandemic-driven disruption to education persists, many schools across the country are or soon will be providing hybrid instruction — a combination of in-person and remote classes. Sometimes, the same teacher even delivers both modes simultaneously.

Hybrid learning can be the best of both worlds or the worst of both worlds, said Bree Dusseault, the practitioner-in-residence at the Center on Reinventing Public Education. 

EWA Radio

No Sports. No Band. No Fun. (And Less Learning?)
With COVID-19 curtailing extracurriculars like sports, fine arts, and special-interest clubs, student engagement suffers at all grade levels, experts say
(EWA Radio: Episode 254)

photo of band instuments

From basketball to band, debate club to dance teams, the coronavirus pandemic has curtailed extracurricular activities for many of the nation’s K-12 students. That could have a long-term impact on student enthusiasm for school overall, experts warn. Longtime education journalist Greg Toppo, writing for The 74, looks at how educators are working to keep kids connected to school, and the research showing a strong link between extracurricular participation and academic achievement.