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Tip Sheet

EWA Tip Sheet: Covering College Certificates and Microcredentials
Here are resources for understanding non-degree higher education alternatives.

Students and workers looking to quickly advance their careers are beginning to seek shorter and cheaper alternatives to traditional college degrees. And colleges, worried about a decline in the number of “traditional” freshmen, are creating alternative programs to attract new tuition-payers.

Blog: The Educated Reporter

Education Dept. to Change College Scorecard, Be Less ‘Prescriptive’ With Accreditors, Officials Say

Federal education officials say they want to help students make more informed decisions about where to go to school, what college will cost, and what return on investment to expect – reflecting U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos’s vision for reducing regulation of higher education while improving the public’s ability to exercise school choice.

Blog: Higher Ed Beat

Changing Demographics Mean Better College Odds for ‘Slugs’
A baby bust is forcing newsworthy changes to college admissions.

America’s declining birth rate has sweeping implications for the U.S. economy and society – especially its education system. Already, a decline in the number of 18-year-olds is forcing many colleges to take actions that journalists should cover, such as: changing recruiting practices, cutting costs, and, in some cases, going out of business, according to a panel of college officials, researchers and journalists speaking at a recent Education Writers Association seminar.

Webinar

Learn About a Handy New Free Education Data Tool

Learn About a Handy New Free Education Data Tool

There’s tons of education data out there, but it is spread out among dozens of different confusing websites, making it hard to use quickly and easily. 

The Urban Institute is trying to address that by creating a centralized K-16 education data one-stop-shop that a few journalistic early adopters tell us is turning out to be fairly handy. 

Webinar

How Much Does College Really Cost? New ‘Tuition Tracker’ Tool Offers Answers.
Interactive Database Shows Sticker Price and ‘Net’ Price for Campuses, Plus Other Key Information

How Much Does College Really Cost? New ‘Tuition Tracker’ Tool Offers Answers.

This webinar provides a demonstration of the updated “Tuition Tracker,” a collaborative data project of The Hechinger Report, EWA and The Dallas Morning News. Journalists can get embargoed access to a new tool documenting how prices at individual colleges have changed for different income groups over the last seven years. The embargo will lift on Thursday, Oct. 18, at 12:01 a.m. EDT.

The new Tuition Tracker provides:

Webinar

Mining Federal Civil Rights Data for Local Stories

Mining Federal Civil Rights Data for Local Stories

Every year, the U.S. Department of Education investigates thousands of school districts and colleges around the country for civil rights violations. The issues include racial discrimination in school discipline, sexual violence on campus and inequitable access to advanced coursework, to name a few. What should journalists know before diving into this notoriously messy data? What are some tips for using the data as the backbone of local news stories?

Blog: Higher Ed Beat

College and the American Dream

Pace University is a medium-sized private college in New York with a sticker price of $66,000.  California State University, Northridge serves more than three times as many students (41,000) and has a sticker price for Californians less than a third of Pace’s ($21,000). 

Blog: Higher Ed Beat

Tips on Covering Race Issues Responsibly
Ask followup questions, add context and use the "R" word carefully.

When covering race issues, journalists can get things things very right, or very wrong. From their story choices, to the context they add and the words they use, opportunities — and risks — abound. That’s especially true for reporters covering schools and colleges, which have been ground zero for some of the most important racial incidents and news stories of the recent past.

Blog: The Educated Reporter

How to Cover Race Issues Accurately and Fairly

Examples of Americans — from prominent political and college leaders to teenagers – making tone-deaf or racist comments continue to make headlines in 2019. Journalists covering such incidents, or just reporting on people from different backgrounds, also need to be vigilant against committing their own faux pas. Deadline pressure, space constraints and implicit biases or lack of knowledge of other cultures can cause journalists to inadvertently make a hurtful statement.