EWA Reporting Fellowship

Overview

Reporting Fellowship Program

The EWA Reporting Fellowship provides financial awards to education journalists to undertake ambitious reporting and writing projects. The EWA Reporting Fellows are selected by EWA through a competitive application process. Each fellow receives a financial award to support an education reporting project, as well as other assistance.

The EWA Reporting Fellowship provides financial awards to education journalists to undertake ambitious reporting and writing projects. The EWA Reporting Fellows are selected by EWA through a competitive application process. Each fellow receives a financial award to support an education reporting project, as well as other assistance.

Latest News

Unschooling at The U School

Flirting with failure — falling behind, realizing it, and reflecting on why — is a part of the process at this “Innovation Network” public high school. Ideally, with each setback, students become increasingly aware of their personal shortcomings and their power to overcome them.

Latest News

What The U.S. Could Learn from Canada about Integrating Immigrant Students

In Canadian public schools, the children of new immigrants do as well as native-born children within three years of arriving. There kids don’t just get language and academic support; their home cultures are celebrated as they are integrated into classes. And strong social services and healthy education funding help too. Special correspondent Kavitha Cardoza of Education Week reports.

Announcement

EWA Invites Education Journalists to Apply for Fellowships With Career Pathways Lens
Awards of up to $8,000 will support ambitious reporting and writing

The Education Writers Association is pleased to announce a call for proposals for its next class of EWA Reporting Fellows, this time with a focus on pathways to and through higher education for all types of students. The fellowships provide financial awards to journalists to undertake ambitious reporting and writing projects. This will be the fifth class of EWA Reporting Fellows.

“We are delighted to be able to offer more opportunities for our journalist members to bring innovative reporting projects to fruition,” said EWA Executive Director Caroline Hendrie.

Information

FAQs About the 2018 EWA Reporting Fellowship: Postsecondary Pathways
Applications Due April 30, 2018

What is the EWA Reporting Fellowship?

The EWA Reporting Fellowship provides financial awards to education journalists to undertake special reporting and writing projects.

How many fellowships will be awarded?

EWA expects to award approximately six to 10 fellowships in this round of the program.

How much money comes with the fellowship?

EWA will provide awards of up to $8,000 a piece to winning proposals.

Key Coverage

This Country Spends Billions On Private Schools – And Has A Terrible Learning Gap Between Poor And Wealthy
School choice in France offers lessons for the U.S.

In theory, vouchers and other private school choice programs open up the same menu of educational opportunities to all, according to (Education Secretary Betsy) DeVos and other school choice supporters. Parents are freed from financial constraints and can pick a school in which their child will thrive, leading to improved academic outcomes for all children.

Key Coverage

In Canada’s Public Schools, Immigrant Students Are Thriving

When 13-year-old André Cordeiro moved from rural Portugal to Toronto, the only English words he knew were, “hi,” “bye,” and “hot dog.” Four years later, he speaks English “way better” and credits the English-learner class he attends every morning at Islington Junior Middle School.

Key Coverage

Betsy Devos’s School Choice Ideas Are a Reality in Sweden, Where Student Performance Has Suffered

It was one of many tense moments at Education Secretary Betsy DeVos’ confirmation hearing this year. Sen. Tim Kaine, D-Va., repeatedly asked DeVos if she believed that all schools that receive public money, including private schools, should meet the same accountability standards. DeVos would not answer yes or no; she eventually began repeating, “I support accountability.”

Key Coverage

What Would Actually Happen If We Gave All Parents The Chance To Pick Their Children’s Schools?

Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos believes the key to improving schools in the United States is simple: Let parents choose where to send their children. Many school choice advocates cheered DeVos’ appointment, hoping it would unleash new funding and federal support for more charter schools, private school vouchers and other “choice” options, such as virtual schools and online programs.

Announcement

EWA Announces New Education Reporting Fellows

EWA Reporting Fellowship

The Education Writers Association is pleased to announce its fourth class of EWA Reporting Fellows as part of the organization’s ongoing efforts to support enterprising journalism projects on education.

“We are delighted to provide additional EWA members with this unique opportunity to dig deeper into the education beat,” said Caroline Hendrie, EWA’s executive director. “These new projects will make important contributions to the public’s understanding of education and further fortify the nation’s education journalism community.”

Key Coverage

Test Drive: New Hampshire Teachers Build New Ways to Measure Deeper Learning

Just outside Concord High School, a delivery truck has spilled its chemical supplies. The students’ mission: Investigate the properties of the spill and develop a detailed plan to clean it up safely.

Teenagers wearing safety goggles squat down, sucking up samples of the clear liquid with pipettes. The simulated spill has been “contained” in a fish tank. But the students play along, first by developing some “testable questions” with their partners: How acidic is it? How does it compare with the properties of each substance on the truck?

Key Coverage

Is School Too Shallow?

There’s an essential skill not being taught enough in classrooms today, say a growing number of American educators. That skill is thinking.

“Most teachers never really ask students to think very deeply…. Most of what is assigned and tested are things we ask students to memorize,” writes Karin Hess, president of Educational Research in Action in Underhill, Vt., and an expert on assessment, in an email to the Monitor.

Key Coverage

Reinventing High School
See how one New Hampshire school is retooling education.

Two-dozen high school students are gathered around a large work table as manufacturing teacher Dan Cassidy holds out boxes of metal bars and gears. The students choose among the parts to build model bicycles. “What else are we going to use today? Let me hear some vocab here,” he says. When a student shouts out “chains,” he nudges them until they recall another term for it: “linkage.”

Key Coverage

Inside Silicon Valley’s Big-Money Push to Remake American Education

On a chilly winter morning in a tiny pocket of Silicon Valley known as North Fair Oaks, Everest Public High School is buzzing with energy. Out front, a tall, skinny teen jumps out of a black Porsche SUV; moments later, three young women in matching black hoodies stream out of the front seat of a Toyota pickup that’s filled with trowels, buckets, and a ladder.

Key Coverage

The Evolving Philadelphia High School

With the sound of drills and nail guns in the background, two ninth-grade boys tried to solve a math problem.

“How many 2-by-4, 8-foot planks am I going to have to buy when I go to Home Depot this afternoon?,” asked Jared Lauterbach, the students’ teacher, “and how many 6-foot planks?”

Key Coverage

Without Its Storied Principal, What’s the Future of Furr High?

This was supposed to be a banner year for Furr High School. It moved into a brand new building and was using a ten million dollar grant to reinvent high school. Even though Hurricane Harvey delayed the school year by two weeks, things seemed to be back to normal.

Longtime principal Bertie Simmons met with a mom who was trying to get her daughter into Furr. 

Key Coverage

Science Learning Academy Takes Its Learning Approach to the Masses

In a corner of a classroom at Science Leadership Academy Middle School is a bookcase with green shelves and a plaque on top, where several students wrote their names in marker.

Having worked on its design, they claimed the bookcase as their own. Visible around the school are other bookcases, some festooned with polka dots, stripes, handprints, and words, all built by creative 5th graders.

Key Coverage

SLA Takes Its Learning Approach To the Masses

In a corner of a classroom at Science Leadership Academy Middle School is a bookcase with green shelves and a plaque on top, where several students wrote their names in marker. Having worked on its design, they claimed the bookcase as their own. Visible around the school are other bookcases, some festooned with polka dots, stripes, handprints, and words, all built by creative 5th graders. These personalized bookcases are the result of both a gift and a problem. 

Key Coverage

At This One-of-a-Kind Boston Public High School, Students Learn Calculus in Spanish

When the Boston Public Schools opened the Margarita Muñiz Academy in 2012, it was a first-of-its kind dual-language high school meant to address issues faced by the city’s growing Hispanic population. At the time, Hispanic students were both the most likely to drop out of the city’s schools and the least likely to enroll in college when compared to black, white and Asian students. They still are, but as the academy enters its sixth full year, its student outcomes are drawing praise from a variety of sources, even while administrators note that steep challenges remain.

Key Coverage

An Unprecedented Partnership

Tymeer Washington held a gold marker above his white mug and considered his identity. After a moment, he drew his name in silver and gold next to a large “24.” “It’s where I’m from,” Washington explained. “24th and Lehigh.”

The 18 students in Danina Garcia’s class at the brand new Vaux Big Picture High School will start each school day with these mugs in their 90-minute advisory period, drinking hot chocolate or tea. It is a chance for students and their adviser, who are expected to stay together for all four years, to bond with each other.

EWA Radio

‘Eddie Prize’ Winner Kelly Field: Reporting on Native American Students
EWA Radio: Episode 134

Journalist Kelly Field recently won a top honor at EWA’s National Seminar for her compelling series, “From the Reservation to College,” on the education of Native American students. Field’s coverage for The Chronicle of Higher Education — supported by an EWA Reporting Fellowship — follows several students from the Blackfeet Indian reservation in Montana. Their experiences highlight the significant educational challenges facing Native communities in the U.S. today.

Key Coverage

Teachers Gear Up For A New Kind Of Ninth Grade

Furr High School is gearing up to launch a new kind of ninth grade. It’s part of how Furr, which used to have a reputation for drop-outs and gang violence, is trying to transform high school, with the help of a $10 million grant. At one recent workshop, half a dozen ninth grade instructors brainstormed for the new ninth grade, thinking about how to give students more ownership in the curriculum and testing.

EWA Radio

A Houston High School’s Transformation
EWA Radio: Episode 129

Laura Isensee of Houston Public Media discusses Furr High School, which recently received a $10 million grant to help it reinvent what, when, and how students learn. The changes are already underway: a veteran principal was lured out of retirement to take the helm; students are able dig into their own areas of interest during regular periods of “Genius Time”; and even the hiring process for teachers and staff has taken some innovative turns. What’s been the response of the school community to these new developments?