Announcement

EWA Announces New Education Reporting Fellows

EWA Reporting Fellowship

The Education Writers Association is pleased to announce its fifth class of EWA Reporting Fellows as part of the organization’s ongoing efforts to support enterprising journalism projects on education.

“We’re delighted to support the in-depth reporting projects proposed by the newest fellows,” said Caroline Hendrie, EWA’s executive director. “Their work will help shed light on the myriad challenges and opportunities facing students as they move from classrooms to careers.”

Eleven applications were selected. Each EWA Reporting Fellowship provides up to $8,000 to help cover reporting costs, plus other assistance.

The newest class of EWA Reporting Fellows represents a range of different types of news outlets. The projects are expected to be published during the 2018-19 academic year.

Meet the Fellows:

Peggy Barmore

Peggy Barmore
The Hechinger Report

Remote, rural school districts are creating a patchwork of programs to help their students graduate high school and succeed in both postsecondary institutions and the workforce: Are these efforts bearing fruit?

Jillian Berman

Jillian Berman
Marketwatch

Are dual-enrollment programs and early college high schools actually delivering on their promises to prepare students for college both academically and financially?

Celia Llopis-JepsenStephan Bisaha

Stephan Bisaha and Celia Llopis-Jepsen
Kansas News Service

Kansas policymakers have announced aggressive postsecondary education goals. Bisaha and Llopis-Jepsen will examine what resources will be needed to achieve the goals.


Kelly Hinchcliffe

Kelly Hinchcliffe
WRAL News

North Carolina’s public universities are eager to recruit high schoolers into teacher training programs. How effective are these approaches, and what’s been the impact?

Ryan McKinnon

Ryan McKinnon
Sarasota Herald-Tribune

How effectively are local career colleges preparing students for the expectations of Florida’s workforce, and what role do state licensing requirements play in the equation?

Bekah McNeel

Bekah McNeel
Texas Public Radio

First-generation college students from Latino communities are often separated from their primary source of support: their families. Where do they look for support, and how do those family ties, at times, present a challenge of their own?

Olivera PerkinsPatrick O’Donnell

Patrick O’Donnell and Olivera Perkins
Cleveland Plain Dealer

The European model of apprenticeships for both blue- and white- collar jobs can mix work and postsecondary education without forcing young people to run up loan debt: How might the model be adapted for the United States?


Matt Krupnick

Matt Krupnick
The Hechinger Report

Analysts contend that U.S. colleges have failed to keep up with training needs in industries crucial to rural communities’ economies. How might those shortcomings be solved?

Ruth Serven

Ruth Serven
The Daily Progress

One year after white supremacist marches in and around the University of Virginia, how is the university perceived by prospective low-income and minority students?

Barbara Shelly

Barbara Shelly
KCUR Kansas City Public Radio

Shelly will profile young refugee students in Kansas City, Missouri, who are attempting to continue their educations beyond high school with the help of local community colleges.

Zaidee Stavely

Zaidee Stavely
PRI/The World

Thousands of young people have arrived in the U.S. from Central America as unaccompanied minors, fleeing violence in their home countries. What supports do they need to help them finish high school, get to and through college, and prepare for the workforce?