EWA Fellows Class 13

Overview

EWA Announces Winter 2022 Class of Reporting Fellows

The Education Writers Association is pleased to announce its 13th class of EWA Reporting Fellows. This program is part of the organization’s drive to support enterprising journalism that informs the public about consequential issues in education.

EWA selected 15 projects in this round. Each EWA Reporting Fellowship provides up to $10,000 to help cover reporting costs, plus other assistance.

“There’s never been a more important time to focus on the critical challenges and opportunities for the nation’s students, families, and educators, from early learning through postsecondary education,” said Caroline Hendrie, EWA’s executive director. “We are delighted to be able to encourage and support high-quality education journalism that will be produced by our newest fellows.” 

The new class of EWA Reporting Fellows represents a diverse mix of news outlets, with most projects to be published during the 2022 calendar year.

Meet the Fellows:

The Education Writers Association is pleased to announce its 13th class of EWA Reporting Fellows. This program is part of the organization’s drive to support enterprising journalism that informs the public about consequential issues in education.

EWA selected 15 projects in this round. Each EWA Reporting Fellowship provides up to $10,000 to help cover reporting costs, plus other assistance.

“There’s never been a more important time to focus on the critical challenges and opportunities for the nation’s students, families, and educators, from early learning through postsecondary education,” said Caroline Hendrie, EWA’s executive director. “We are delighted to be able to encourage and support high-quality education journalism that will be produced by our newest fellows.” 

The new class of EWA Reporting Fellows represents a diverse mix of news outlets, with most projects to be published during the 2022 calendar year.

Meet the Fellows:

Larry Gordon
Fellow Profile

Larry Gordon
EdSource

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