Education and the American Dream: Pathways From High School to Colleges and Careers

Overview

Education and the American Dream: Pathways From High School to College and Careers
Northwestern University • November 14-15, 2019

What will it take to make the U.S. education system a more powerful engine for economic mobility? What are the obstacles, especially for low-income families and students of color?

At this journalists-only seminar on Nov. 14-15 in Chicago, we will explore these and other questions, with a special focus on emerging efforts to create stronger pathways from high school to college and promising careers.

Here is a copy of the agenda.

Topics we expect to address include: 

What will it take to make the U.S. education system a more powerful engine for economic mobility? What are the obstacles, especially for low-income families and students of color?

At this journalists-only seminar on Nov. 14-15 in Chicago, we will explore these and other questions, with a special focus on emerging efforts to create stronger pathways from high school to college and promising careers.

Here is a copy of the agenda.

Topics we expect to address include: 

  • What do we really know about the impact of K-12 and higher education on economic mobility? What data can help inform local coverage of your schools and colleges?
  • Where are promising examples of schools replacing dead-end vocational tracks with high-quality career and technical education that leads to careers with a future?
  • Why does guidance counseling in schools often fall short, and what are promising ways to address the problem?
  • What’s the track record of Advanced Placement, dual enrollment, and dual credit programs in serving disadvantaged students, and what are the best ways to gauge the impact of local programs? 
  • What are some high schools learning as they pivot to measure the success of their graduates? And how are they seeking to help students on their postsecondary journeys?

Journalists will come away from this two-day event with a deeper understanding of the issues, practical story ideas, and knowledge of how to find and use valuable data sets to inform their reporting. They also will have the chance to network and build relationships with fellow journalists, experts, and educators.

This event is open to EWA journalist members only. Information on registering for this event will be available soon. Eligible journalists may apply for scholarships to reimburse expenses for lodging and basic travel costs.

Apply for Journalist Scholarship

Register Now

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Those were two key takeaways from the opening session of a recent Education Writers Association seminar in Chicago. 

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“His mom said, ‘Don’t go if you don’t want to,’” Brown recalled. So the student, who grew up in the Robert Taylor Homes housing project on Chicago’s South Side, didn’t go.

But Brown — who spent 40 years working as a school counselor in Chicago Public Schools — knew this student would thrive in a college setting because of the relationship she’d built with him. So she drove him to college herself.