EdMedia Commons Archive

A School District’s Success is Only as Good as It’s Administrators!

I am very tired of people who do not work in education, follow trends in education, cover topics in education, research education and get involved in education in their community, blaming teachers for our poor education system! In most states, principals supervise non-tenured teachers over a three year period! That is certainly enough time to assess whether a teacher has the skills needed to be effective. However, many principals don’t have the skills themselves to assess teachers. They tenure teachers who have no parental complaints, have lesson plans done and come to work on time.

What about the delivery of what’s on paper? Is there differentiated instruction? Are strategies in place to catch those students who are struggling? How are the needs of special and learning disabled students being met? Does the teacher implement new programs the district buys into? How does the teacher group the students? Does the teacher communicate with parents. Does the teacher prepare tests that cover what’s been taught? Does the teacher refer students to support staff to decipher a student’s skills or behavior? I could write a whole essay about what makes an effective teacher. I try to stay away from the term ‘good’ teacher because we need effective teachers! So some principals are ineffective, too. Who hires principals? Superintendents do! To go full circle, school boards hire superintendents! There needs to be knowledgeable school board members from the community who can create an action plan to hire a superintendent who is qualified, has experience, is multicultural, has foresight and is proactive, has a vision and a plan and most importantly has improved academics in a district similar to theirs! Then the talent will trickle down to the students! And this is the problem with education today


This post originally appeared on EWA’s now-defunct online community, EdMedia Commons. Old content from EMC will appear in the Ed Beat archives.