EdMedia Commons Archive

Higher Ed Conference Videos: Online Learning, College Costs, Budget Crises and More

dsynHigher Ed Conference Videos: Online Learning, College Costs, Budget Crises and MoreHigher Ed Conference Videos: Online Learning, College Costs, Budget Crises and MoreHigher Ed Conference Videos: Online Learning, College Costs, Budget Crises and More

EWA’s seminar for higher education reporters was held on Nov. 4 and 5 at UCLA. We’ve already got a few podcasts up, and you can view more resources here. Below, the first of eight videos drawn from the conference — we’ll have more next week.

  • Interview: Robert Archibald, author of Why Does College Cost So Much?, talks about why higher education should be viewed in the context of other sectors of the economy.
  • Higher Ed’s Cash Crunch: Who’s Getting Hurt? The latest updates on what government budget cuts mean for colleges and students. What is the current impact on public colleges and universities and what is the outlook for further cuts in 2012?
  • Can Technology Fix Higher Education? As more students crowd classrooms, many colleges and professors are looking for new ways to use technology to make the learning experience more effective. From large-scale course redesigns to using Twitter to pass “notes” in class, what’s the impact when college courses get plugged in?
  • Interview: Kaplan CEO Andrew Rosen talks about the boom in online education, and reacts to increased government regulation of private-sector institutions.
  • Interview: UCLA’s John Pryor talks about how reporters and educational institutions are using data from the CIRP Freshman Survey.
  • When Minority Becomes Majority: Achieving Success With Students of Color. Colleges and universities have always had difficulty recruiting and graduating black and Latino students. Now that those exact students are becoming larger percentages of the traditional college population, higher education will face more pressure to guide these students to degrees.
  • A Glass Half Full: A Look at Student Retention. Statistics say that approximately half of the students who enroll in college never finish. Why do these students “stop-out” and what can colleges and universities do to help more of them earn degrees?


This post originally appeared on EWA’s now-defunct online community, EdMedia Commons. Old content from EMC will appear in the Ed Beat archives.