Covering Higher Education's New Political Landscape

Overview

Covering Higher Education’s New Political Landscape

A big increase in college student voter turnout helped flip the U.S. House of Representatives to Democratic control and elected scores of new state and local officials. Now, it's clear that higher education will be shaped by—and will shape—the new political landscape of 2019.

To help journalists cover the impact of the midterms on education beyond high school, the Education Writers Association is holding a two-day intensive training seminar January 28-29 in Washington, D.C.

The seminar, which will be held at the Hotel Monaco in Washington, will allow a select group of journalists opportunities to hear from leading experts on issues expected to be at play in 2019, such as student debt, voting controversies, “free” college, and higher education deregulation. In addition, participants will receive data and skills training on subjects such as campaign finance and college accountability databases.

A big increase in college student voter turnout helped flip the U.S. House of Representatives to Democratic control and elected scores of new state and local officials. Now, it’s clear that higher education will be shaped by—and will shape—the new political landscape of 2019.

To help journalists cover the impact of the midterms on education beyond high school, the Education Writers Association is holding a two-day intensive training seminar January 28-29 in Washington, D.C.

The seminar, which will be held at the Hotel Monaco in Washington, will allow a select group of journalists opportunities to hear from leading experts on issues expected to be at play in 2019, such as student debt, voting controversies, “free” college, and higher education deregulation. In addition, participants will receive data and skills training on subjects such as campaign finance and college accountability databases.

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Weakest Students More Likely to Take Online College Classes but do Worse in Them

Online college classes and degrees give working adults a lot of flexibility in furthering their educations but there’s a big policy debate over whether students are learning much. According to the most recent federal statistics from 2016, roughly one out of every three or 6.3 million college students learned online. That number is growing even as fewer people are going to college. About half of them were enrolled in online degree programs and take all of their classes on the internet.