Blog: Latino Ed Beat

Overview

Latino Ed Beat

A blog about issues affecting Latino students in P-12 and post-secondary education.

A blog about issues affecting Latino students in P-12 and post-secondary education.

Blog: Latino Ed Beat

Do English Language Learner Programs Work?

About one in four American children are immigrants or were born to immigrant parents. By 2050, immigrant children–the fastest growing student population–are expected to make up one-third of the country’s under-18 population.

For those children, the majority of whom are Latino, learning English is key to academic achievement.  But how well are English as Second Language programs–designed to help non-English speakers master academic English–working?

Blog: Latino Ed Beat

Covering Latino Students Who Succeed

There’s been some good news on the Latino education front.

A new study from the Pew Hispanic Center shows that Latino college enrollment jumped by 24 percent — or nearly 350,000 students — from 2009 to 2010, outpacing black and Asian enrollment. For the first time, the study showed, Latino students on campus outnumbered black students.

Blog: Latino Ed Beat

How Will New Race to the Top Affect Latino Preschoolers?

The race is on among states competing for a slice of the $500 million federal dollars set aside to improve early childhood education systems. In August, the U.S. Department of Education released the application for its Race to the Top Early Learning Challenge, a competition to reward states that align the many players involved in early childhood to improve data and program quality assessments and expand access to more high-risk children.

Blog: Latino Ed Beat

School Choice in San Diego Leads to School Segregation

In one San Diego neighborhood, white families are choosing to send their children to private school rather than to the neighborhood elementary school. Latino families from other neighborhoods, in contrast, are going out of their way to choose that school for their children.

The result? Self segregation.

Blog: Latino Ed Beat

New Study: Bilingual Babies’ Speech Perceptions Stay Flexible Longer

New research from the University of Washington’s Institute for Learning and Brain Sciences shows that bilingual babies stay open to different speech sounds for a longer period than monolingual babies and that the relative amount of each language babies are exposed to affects their vocabulary as toddlers. Not surprisingly, in a sample of English/Spanish bilingual babies, the more of one language they heard, the more of that language they spoke at 15 months.