Blog: Latino Ed Beat

Overview

Latino Ed Beat

A blog about issues affecting Latino students in P-12 and post-secondary education.

A blog about issues affecting Latino students in P-12 and post-secondary education.

Blog: Latino Ed Beat

Supreme Court to Consider Affirmative Action in College Admissions

The U.S. Supreme Court will take up a case involving the use of race in admissions decisions at the University of Texas. Affirmative action has long been a hot-button issue.

UT currently admits the top 10 percent of high school graduates. However, the state uses race and ethnicity as a factor when considering whether to admit students who are not in the top 10 percent. In 2010, among undergraduates accepted 49 percent were white, 22.5 percent Latino, 5 percent black with Asian students accounting for most of the remainder.

Blog: Latino Ed Beat

Were Immigrant Parents Afraid to Report Sex Abuse Allegations at California School?

The children attending the Los Angeles elementary school where two teachers were recently charged with sexual abuse largely fit a certain profile–they are Latino, poor and have immigrant parents. In 2011, 98 percent of the 1,471 students at Miramonte Elementary School were Hispanic.

Those factors might make the children there particularly vulnerable because such families often avoid contact with police.

Blog: Latino Ed Beat

Education Secretary Arne Duncan Holds ‘Twitter Town Hall’ on Latino Education

The DREAM Act, parent involvement and early education were just a few of the issues touched on in an online question and answer session addressing Hispanic education issues that U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan participated in on Wednesday. Duncan and Jose Rico, the director of the White House Initiative on Education Excellence for Hispanics, answered questions posted on Facebook and Twitter.

Blog: Latino Ed Beat

Achievement of Latino Boys Continues to Lag Behind Girls

We often hear about the achievement gaps between Latino students and their non-Hispanic peers, but a significant achievement gap also exists among Latino students themselves: Boys trail significantly behind girls. Boys tend to be more likely to drop out of high school and less likely to graduate from college, for example.

Blog: Latino Ed Beat

In Tucson, Activists Protest the Removal of Books by Latino Authors

Depending on whom you ask, the Tucson Unified School District is either banning books or just boxing them up for storage.

But everybody agrees that numerous books written by Latino authors were removed from classrooms in January. They were banished after Arizona’s school superintendent John Huppenthal deemed the Mexican American Studies program racially divisive and illegal. As a result, books were removed when the program was dismantled.