Blog: The Educated Reporter

Overview

The Educated Reporter

EWA's blog about education issues and topics from a journalist's perspective. The Educated Reporter is anchored by Emily Richmond with contributions from EWA staff and guests.

EWA’s blog about education issues and topics from a journalist’s perspective. The Educated Reporter is anchored by Emily Richmond with contributions from EWA staff and guests.

Blog: The Educated Reporter

“Low-achieving” label from a teacher’s POV.

Patrick Welsh is one of the best education writers at the Washington Post. Except he is not a Post employee; he is a high school English teacher who contributes often to the paper’s Outlook section. Check out this really interesting piece on what it felt like when his school, T.C. Williams in Alexandria, Va., was labeled “persistently low-achieving” a couple weeks ago.

Blog: The Educated Reporter

The Incompleters are complete.

Every team in John’s NCAA bracket—the schools with the lower graduation rate in each game—is out. He is in 87th place of 87 in his office pool. (Is there a booby prize?) The Completers are in 66th place as of Sunday night, with Cornell and Duke still alive. There’s no chance for a decent showing, but at least the Completers beat the Incompleters, which should please Arne Duncan.

Blog: The Educated Reporter

Unsubscribed.

I called subscriber services at the Washington Post last week and got an automated voice that said, “To cancel your subscription, press 4 or say ‘cancel.’” When said “cancel,” I was told, “That is not a valid entry.” When I pressed 4, I was told, “That is not a valid entry.” Nice attempt at self-preservation!

Blog: The Educated Reporter

Final Four update: Go Incompleters!

How about that: John’s Incompleters are in fourth place, ahead of Barack Obama (18th) and the Completers (73rd). Not sure how that is possible, given that seven of his Elite Eight are wiped out already, but I guess he gets lots of points for all the upsets. This sort of makes me wish I played a real bracket, because I hate losing.

Blog: The Educated Reporter

Upset.

Well, a couple hours later and I am already out of the game, most likely. Notre Dame, 95 percent of your students graduate! However, you lost in the first round and therefore cannot win the tournament, as I had hoped. Old Dominion (49 percent) triumphed.

This whole project is amusing to me mainly because my husband is now randomly proclaiming “Go UTEP!” Yes, he had to look up what that stands for, and no, he has never cheered for a sports team before in his life. He and the Incompleters were tied, last I looked, for first place in the pool.

Blog: The Educated Reporter

Press release roundup: blueprint reactions.

The press releases flowing into my inbox in the past week are mostly some form of “Association for XX Reacts to Administration’s Blueprint for ESEA Reauthorization,” and they are utterly unsurprising. A sampling (and I am not doing this again, so please do not take this as an invitation for more press releases):

Blog: The Educated Reporter

The blueprint: more questions than answers.

When we are talking about, say, buildings, the word “blueprint” means a detailed model of what a structure is going to look like. When we are talking about federal education policy, it turns out “blueprint” means something far vaguer.

Blog: The Educated Reporter

Story of the moment: recess coaches.

“Structured recess” sounds like an oxymoron, especially to those people who are, as one girl in Not Much Just Chillin’ put it, “allergic to anything with the word ‘ball.’” For the introverted and athletically uninclined, fresh hell might be a coach forcing you into a game of kickball during a precious half-hour you could be spending slumped along the wall of the school building, undisturbed by the classmates who will never understand you, reading kiddy manga.

Blog: The Educated Reporter

College-ready: off the record.

Yesterday’s Education Sector panel on college and career readiness was a success; you can see the video here. Which is funny given that one of the presenters announced that everything she was about to say was on background. I know congressional staffers often aren’t supposed to be quoted instead of their bosses, but this is one Washington habit that will never make sense to me.

Blog: The Educated Reporter

A review is not the book.

Yes, I am overdue in saying something about Diane Ravitch’s book, and I intend to. But in the meantime I will just say this: The reviews of a book are not the book. Especially when I wrote Tested, I was amazed at how people misinterpreted what I wrote; later I would learn they did not read the book but only reviews of it. So an offhand comment by Sandy Kress in National Journal’s conversation about how the feds would hold states accountable on RtTT hit a raw nerve for me.