State of the Education Beat

Overview

State of the Education Beat 2021

Survey of Education Journalists Sheds Light on Impact, Obstacles

Who are today's journalists on the education beat? What obstacles do they face as they seek to inform the public? Where do they turn for information? What do they believe needs to change about their own profession?

EWA partnered with the EdWeek Research Center once again to answer these and other questions in State of the Education Beat 2021. The new report is based on a national survey of more than 400 education journalists – plus follow-up interviews with a smaller group of education reporters and editors.

At a launch event, postponed until Wednesday, Jan. 27, at 1 p.m. Eastern time, EWA will show a short video presentation. In addition, you’ll hear from a distinguished panel of journalists and experts, and have a chance to ask questions. Register now for the event. (Those who registered previously do NOT need to register again.)

Survey of Education Journalists Sheds Light on Impact, Obstacles

Who are today’s journalists on the education beat? What obstacles do they face as they seek to inform the public? Where do they turn for information? What do they believe needs to change about their own profession?

EWA partnered with the EdWeek Research Center once again to answer these and other questions in State of the Education Beat 2021. The new report is based on a national survey of more than 400 education journalists – plus follow-up interviews with a smaller group of education reporters and editors.

At a launch event, postponed until Wednesday, Jan. 27, at 1 p.m. Eastern time, EWA will show a short video presentation. In addition, you’ll hear from a distinguished panel of journalists and experts, and have a chance to ask questions. Register now for the event. (Those who registered previously do NOT need to register again.)

 

Webinar

Register Now: Jan. 27 Release Event for The State of the Education Beat Report
Survey of journalists reveals impact, obstacles, and what needs to change in profession

photo collage of EWA Journalist members

NOTICE: DUE TO WIDESPREAD INTERNET OUTAGES ON 1/26 THIS EVENT HAS BEEN POSTPONED UNTIL 1:00 PM ET JANUARY 1/27.

Education is at the center of the news like never before. But what obstacles do education journalists face as they seek to inform the public? What do they see as the most important issues in education today? And what do they believe needs to change about their own profession?

For answers to these and other questions, join us January 27 at 1 p.m. Eastern time for the release of The State of the Education Beat report, based on a national survey of education journalists. The report was produced for EWA by the EdWeek Research Center.

Following a short video presentation, you’ll hear from a distinguished panel of journalists and experts, and have a chance to ask questions. The panel will feature: 

  • Greg Toppo, president, EWA Board of Directors (moderator) 
  • Erica Green, education reporter, The New York Times
  • Jason Gonzales, education reporter, Chalkbeat Colorado
  • Caroline Hendrie, executive director, EWA
  • Holly Kurtz, director, EdWeek Research Center

Register Now for the Event

Register Now: Jan. 27 Release Event for The State of the Education Beat Report

Announcement

Journalists: Please Take Our ‘State of the Education Beat’ Survey

How is the education beat changing? What are the biggest challenges and biggest stories? How much do education reporters and editors get paid these days? To answer these and other important questions, we need your help.

EWA is partnering with the Education Week Research Center to conduct a national survey of working journalists who cover education. The survey is anonymous and should only take a few minutes to complete. It’s the cornerstone of an EWA project to produce a second State of the Education Beat report later this year.

Blog: The Educated Reporter

Many Happy ‘Returns’: Why Reporters Come Back to the Education Beat

Education reporter Bethany Barnes poses in Las Vegas, shortly before she moved on to her current assignment with The Oregonian. (Photo credit: Chase Stevens)

Reporters listen to a presentation about the "State of the Ed Beat" survey at EWA's 69th National Seminar in Boston in May 2016. (Lilli Boxer for EWA)

For Neal Morton, taking over the K-12 schools beat for the Las Vegas Review-Journal earlier this year represented two kinds of homecoming.

First, he grew up in the Las Vegas valley. Second, he was returning to the education beat after stints covering business and tourism for the San Antonio Express-News. Earlier in his career, Morton spent a little over two years covering schools for The Monitor newspaper in McAllen, Texas.

Announcement

Nation’s Education Reporters Confident They’re Making a Difference
First-ever survey also reveals gender pay gap, concerns about clicks and time pressures

Despite facing real challenges, the men and women who report on education are confident about their professional futures, believe they’re making a difference in their communities, and view their “beat” as a destination rather than a steppingstone to another position.

“Reporters who cover education are finding purpose in covering a subject that they believe is critical to America’s future,” said Scott Elliott, the president of the Education Writers Association’s Board of Directors and the bureau chief of Chalkbeat Indiana. “They know the work they do matters.”

Multimedia

EWA Executive Director Presents Findings From First-Of-Its-Kind Survey
State Of The Education Beat 2016

EWA Executive Director Presents Findings From First-Of-Its-Kind Survey

Education journalists have the critically important task of informing the public about education at the local, state, and national levels. But little is known about this sector of the news media. What does this workforce look like? Do education journalists believe their work matters? Are they satisfied in their jobs? What challenges does the field face to better informing public dialogue on education?