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Blog: Latino Ed Beat

Getting Latino Students To and Through College

Michele Siqueiros recalled the day she arrived on a college campus.

“I thought I had arrived on another planet,” she told a recent gathering of journalists who attended the Education Writers Association’s fourth annual convening for Spanish-language media. “There were very few Latinos.”

Siqueiros, now the president of The Campaign for College Opportunity, a California nonprofit organization, said she was a straight A student in high school, but in college “I felt for the first time I wasn’t prepared.”

Blog: The Educated Reporter

What You Missed at EWA’s Seminar on Rethinking High School

Education journalists from across the U.S. gathered this week in San Diego, on the campus of High Tech High, to explore efforts to rethink the American high school. Along the way, they heard from fellow reporters, as well as educators, analysts and students.

Awards

Submit Your Best Reporting for EWA Awards
Entries Due Dec. 15

The Education Writers Association’s National Awards for Education Reporting advance education journalism by recognizing the field’s very best efforts. This contest’s goals are to

  • Encourage and inspire more and better education journalism, and
  • Underscore the importance of excellent coverage and storytelling as a cornerstone of democracy and education.
Blog: The Educated Reporter

How Investing in Early Childhood Education Could Help School Districts Save Big

The evidence base for early childhood education expanded last month with the release of two reports that, together, analyze the outcomes of more than 100 early childhood interventions.

The reports, from the Rand Corporation and the American Educational Research Association (AERA), find short- and long-term benefits for children and families, and identify potential cost-savings for schools and government.

Blog: The Educated Reporter

How Should the Government Support Families?
Experts debate federal policies that support early care and learning

Government agencies give lip service to the importance of high-quality child care and early learning programs, but the patchwork system of tax breaks and government grants has too many gaps, causing many families to struggle with bills. And many communities have too few options for high-quality early learning opportunities. That was the consensus of a panel of experts who spoke at the Education Writers Association’s early childhood conference Nov. 6 and 7.

They debated however, the causes of and potential fixes to the problems – ranging from taxes to grants to privatization.

Blog: The Educated Reporter

Six Tips for Using Twitter (and Other Social Media Platforms)
Twitter and Facebook can be useful reporting tools, not just places to post cat GIFs

For journalists already enduring understaffed newsrooms, shrinking news holes and daily deadlines, social media platforms such as Facebook and Twitter may seem more like an additional burden than a useful tool. But they don’t have to be.

Social media can be a powerful tool for culling sources, breaking news, and promoting your work, among other things.

It’s Greek to Me: How to Report on Media-Averse Fraternities
Webinar

It’s Greek to Me: How to Report on Media-Averse Fraternities

In the last several weeks, reports of hazing, racist attacks and pledge deaths have prompted at least eight universities to suspended fraternity chapters — and in some cases all Greek-affiliated organizations — on campus.

Fraternities and sororities have become the center of some of higher education’s most troubling stories. There are deaths of pledges, parties that become scenes for sexual `assault, and historically racist standards for entry that also perpetuate inequity with prohibitive annual fees and dress codes.

Blog: The Educated Reporter

Tight Budgets Force Hard Choices Among Child Care Providers
Funding constraints, high cost of quality leave early learning programs feeling squeezed

“An impossible equation.” That’s how Phil Acord describes the challenge of keeping afloat a high-quality early learning program that serves children from low-income families.

As the president of the Chambliss Center for Children, a nonprofit organization that provides around-the-clock care and education to young children in Chattanooga, Tennessee, Acord knows well how difficult it can be for child care providers to simply keep their doors open each month.

Blog: Latino Ed Beat

As Latino Enrollment in Charters Grows, Debates Persist

Charter school advocates and skeptics speaking at a recent Education Writers Association convening for Spanish-language media agreed on little except this: Charter schools are having a big impact on Latino communities nationwide.

EWA Radio

Why Public Research Universities Are Struggling
Higher education enrollment downturns, federal funding predictions, and how U.S. global competitiveness could be at risk.

For a growing number of public universities, particularly in the midwest, what was once a push for academic excellence is now more like a battle for survival, as detailed by The Hechinger Report’s Jon Marcus in a new piece for Washington Monthly. What happened? Enrollment drops, funding cuts and shifting public attitudes toward higher education.

Blog: Higher Ed Beat

Do Affirmative Action Policies Harm Asian-American College Admissions?

The often secretive and arbitrary-seeming acceptance and rejection decisions by elite colleges have long sparked controversy and, thus, news stories.

But new complaints by high-achieving students of Asian descent are raising questions about a kind of racism that may well be surprising to most Americans, as well as challenges to long-standing affirmative action policies, according to a panel of admissions experts who spoke at the Education Writers Association’s Higher Education conference Oct. 2-3.

EWA Radio

When Cyber-Hackers Attack, School Districts Are Paying the Ransom.
Data security, student privacy, employee records at risk

From Georgia to California, school districts are facing a growing security threat: hackers. They target everything from employee payroll accounts to student records, and demand ransom in exchange for not taking advantage of sensitive information. Tawnell Hobbs of The Wall Street Journal discovered that school districts are surprisingly vulnerable to cyber attacks. And many are opting to pay the ransom and not reporting the crime to authorities. Is your school district a target?