Home

Blog: The Educated Reporter

How Did Education Fare at the Ballot Box in 2018?

What was the big takeaway for education in the 2018 elections? Sorry if this disappoints, but there just doesn’t appear to be a clear, simple story to tell. It was an election of seeming contradictions.

This was especially true in gubernatorial races, which matter a lot, given the key role state leaders play in education.

EWA Radio

Get Out the (Teen) Vote
How school shootings, Trump, and campus activism are shaping civic engagement
(EWA Radio: Episode 188)

What’s on the minds of teens eligible to vote for the first time this year? Where do they get the news and information that’s shaping their views of candidates? How have their families, school experiences, and recent current events like the Parkland school shooting and President Trump’s agenda influenced their political awareness? Alyson Klein of Education Week takes us inside the publication’s new poll of voters ages 18 and 19, sharing insights from follow-up interviews with some survey respondents.

Mining Federal Civil Rights Data for Local Stories
Webinar

Mining Federal Civil Rights Data for Local Stories

Every year, the U.S. Department of Education investigates thousands of school districts and colleges around the country for civil rights violations. The issues include racial discrimination in school discipline, sexual violence on campus and inequitable access to advanced coursework, to name a few. What should journalists know before diving into this notoriously messy data? What are some tips for using the data as the backbone of local news stories?

P-16 Topic

Education and the 2018 Elections

The stakes for education are high in the 2018 midterm elections. But the reasons go far beyond whether President Donald Trump will still have a Republican-controlled Congress. A host of state and local races, including gubernatorial and school board contests, will matter — a lot.

Survey of Teen Voters: What’s on Their Minds as Election Nears?
Webinar

Survey of Teen Voters: What’s on Their Minds as Election Nears?
Get embargoed access to Education Week data, analysis at reporters-only webinar

Millions of young people — including many college students and some still in high school — will get their first chance to vote in a general election in November. What is on the minds of these youths, who have come of age in the time of President Trump and when the school shootings in Parkland, Fla., have helped to catalyze a surge of student activism?

EWA Reporting Fellowship
Announcement

EWA Announces 10 New Reporting Fellows

The Education Writers Association is pleased to announce its sixth class of EWA Reporting Fellows as part of the organization’s ongoing efforts to support enterprising journalism projects on education.

“From investigative reporting to deep data dives to long-form narratives, our new fellows reflect a diverse range of topics and approaches,” said Caroline Hendrie, EWA’s executive director. “We are delighted to be able to support such ambitious and timely education journalism.”

EWA Radio

The Feds Have 13,000 Migrant Kids in Custody. Who’s Teaching Them?
Investigation finds little oversight of private companies providing required academic instruction inside detention facilities
(EWA Radio: Episode 184)

Thousands of migrant children have been taken into custody while crossing the border into the U.S., either on their own or while traveling with family members. While they await a court date, the federal government is required to provide school-age detainees—being held in facilities across the country—with daily schooling. In a new investigation, Lauren Camera of U.S.

Seminar

Formula for Fairness: Striving for Educational Equity
Providence, Rhode Island • November 29-30, 2018

Persistent inequities in education—along lines of race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status—are sparking renewed efforts to upend conventional practices in public education. Fostering more “student-centered” learning. Reducing segregation in schools and classrooms. Revamping school funding formulas. Promoting more equitable access to high-quality teachers and challenging coursework. Rethinking student discipline. The list goes on.

Post

Donate Today

The support of our members makes our work possible. Your contribution enables us to continue our work empowering education reporters and writers to tell stories that make a difference. Please consider making a tax-deductible* donation to the Reporting on Education Fund.

Last year your support helped EWA greatly expand the number of Reporter Scholarships to events designed to expand their skills and knowledge of the education beat. We hope you’ll help us this year as we continue to upgrade our offerings.

How Much Does College Really Cost? New ‘Tuition Tracker’ Tool Offers Answers.
Webinar

How Much Does College Really Cost? New ‘Tuition Tracker’ Tool Offers Answers.
Interactive Database Shows Sticker Price and ‘Net’ Price for Campuses, Plus Other Key Information

This webinar provides a demonstration of the updated “Tuition Tracker,” a collaborative data project of The Hechinger Report, EWA and The Dallas Morning News. Journalists can get embargoed access to a new tool documenting how prices at individual colleges have changed for different income groups over the last seven years. The embargo will lift on Thursday, Oct. 18, at 12:01 a.m. EDT.

The new Tuition Tracker provides:

EWA Radio

Want to Help Students in Poverty? Help Their Families, Too.
A review of research finds positive benefits to boosting family well-being
(EWA Radio: Episode 183)

In the debate over how to boost student achievement, especially among kids from low-income families, out-of-school factors are often cited as hurdles that even the best school-based programs and services can’t fully overcome. But what about programs that focus on lifting an entire family out of poverty?

EWA Radio

Why Four-Day School Weeks Are Gaining Ground
Districts use shorter schedule to cut costs, recruit teachers
(EWA Radio: Episode 185)

Once more common to rural communities, the four-day school week is growing in popularity in suburban and urban districts as a way to reduce costs, boost student engagement, and even retain staff. Tawnell Hobbs of The Wall Street Journal found the number of school systems following a four-day academic week has skyrocketed in the past decade, from about 120 districts in 17 states to at least 600 districts in 22 states this year.