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Video: Lunch Break With Ms. Joyce Abbott at EWA’s 75th National Seminar
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Video: Lunch Break With Ms. Joyce Abbott at EWA’s 75th National Seminar
The namesake for the ABC sitcom 'Abbott Elementary' discusses public education and more.

Ms. Joyce Abbott, the namesake for the ABC sitcom “Abbott Elementary,” joined the Education Writers Association’s 75th National Seminar on July 24, 2022.

In a Q&A during lunch time at the conference, Abbott discusses her remarkable career as an educator in Philadelphia and the current landscape for public education.

  • Joyce Abbott, Philadelphia School District (retired)
  • Erica Green, The New York Times (moderator)

 

Blog: The Educated Reporter

Reporting on College Affordability? Keep 3 Lessons in Mind.
The Education Department’s James Kvaal speaks about the future of higher education and the Biden administration’s role.

As education journalists analyze new federal higher education proposals and the continuing public debate about student loan forgiveness, a panel featuring a top U.S. Department of Education official offers some lessons to keep in mind.

photo by Alliance for Excellent Education
EWA Radio

Revisiting America’s Reading Wars
As momentum builds to change reading instruction, Lucy Calkins, chief architect of popular method, retreats from prior stance
(EWA Radio Episode 295)

For decades, millions of children have been taught to read using a popular method that’s out of step with the scientific research on how our brains really learn. Amid pushback and criticism – including from researchers, parents, and education journalists – that’s starting to change.

Announcement

EWA Announces 14th Class of Reporting Fellows

The Education Writers Association is pleased to welcome its 14th class of EWA Reporting Fellows. This program is part of the organization’s drive to support enterprising journalism that informs the public about consequential issues in education.

photo of Kavitha Cardoza
Announcement

Education Journalist Kavitha Cardoza Joins EWA

EWA is delighted to announce an addition to our team: veteran education journalist Kavitha Cardoza. She will serve as public editor for a year while Emily Richmond is on leave for the Spencer Education Fellowship at Columbia University. Kavitha’s first day was June 1.

Emily Richmond, EWA’s public editor since 2011, will spend the 2022-23 academic year researching and reporting on the U.S. Department of Defense’s K-12 schools, which serve more than 67,000 students from military-connected families around the globe. 

Blog: The Educated Reporter

Covering Parent Activism and Engagement? Go Beyond Critical Race Theory
‘Sexy headlines’ about the latest education controversy often grab attention. Learn why reporters shouldn’t limit their coverage. Plus, get research and the history of parent engagement in education.

A new generation of parent activists has arrived, and its members are far more concerned with “ballot boxes, legislative agendas and school district policy priorities than bake sales,” according to a new report from the public policy think tank FutureEd.

Agenda

Agenda: EWA 75th National Seminar
July 24-26, 2022

The Education Writers Association’s 75th anniversary National Seminar will provide a long-awaited opportunity for the community that cares about high-quality education journalism to gather in person for three days of networking, training and inspiration.

Announcement

EWA Announces Finalists for 2021 National Awards for Education Reporting

May 18, 2022 (WASHINGTON, DC)—The Education Writers Association is pleased to announce the category finalists for the 2021 National Awards for Education Reporting, recognizing the top education journalism in the United States.

In a year featuring dramatic disputes over masking, vaccines, school closures, and diversity, finalists adroitly covered high-profile controversies ranging from efforts to address racism in schools to the way educators handled instruction during the pandemic. 

Blog: The Educated Reporter

Gun Violence in Schools and Communities: A Conversation With Journalists

It’s probably every reporter’s worst nightmare: Your co-worker rushes over from the police scanner and blurts out, “Active shooter at Such-and-Such School.”

When that happened to South Florida Sun-Sentinel education reporter Scott Travis on Valentine’s Day 2018, “I headed there hoping more than anything that this was a false alarm,” he told EWA seminar attendees May 6. But he was headed to Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School.

Blog: The Educated Reporter

Does Money Matter? How Education Spending Affects Student Outcomes
What reporters should closely watch amid school spending initiatives and discussions

With school districts across the country seeing an unprecedented influx of federal aid to fuel the education recovery, the question remains of what impact these extra dollars will ultimately have on students.

School finance expert Diane Whitmore Schanzenbach of Northwestern University sees ample scholarly evidence that spending more improves outcomes for K-12 students.

photo of Deniff Lara
EWA Radio

Can the Latino College Gap Be Solved?
Texas Public Radio series sheds new light on sources of struggle for higher education students in majority Latino San Antonio, as well as innovative support systems that are making gains
(EWA Radio Episode 294)

For Texas student Andres Mendoza, the difference between fulfilling his dream of attending a four-year university away from home and opting for a lower-cost local community college was an unexpected bill for a family funeral.

Photo of bleachers beside womens' baseball field.
EWA Radio

‘Unlevel Playing Fields’ for Girls’ Sports
As Title IX turns 50, a new investigation finds the federal law is failing to protect girls’ access to sports, and many parents and students don’t know the rights afforded by the landmark equity law
(EWA Radio Episode 293)

Title IX prohibits gender-based discrimination in school programs that receive federal funding – but how fairly is the law being applied, especially when it comes to girls’ high school sports? A reporting team of nearly two dozen student journalists at the University of Maryland, College Park, set out to answer that question in a wide-ranging project.

Why Reporters Should Cover Middle School
Webinar

Why Reporters Should Cover Middle School
Learning about the middle school years will help journalists better cover youth learning and brain development.

Although middle school is often treated as just a way station between elementary and high school, there’s much more to the story. In fact, the middle school years are a time of profound change for young people – physically, emotionally, and intellectually. These years are a crucial time for learning and brain development, a reality that is often overlooked or misconstrued.