The U.S. Elections & Education: Part 2

Overview

Election 2016: New President, New Education Agenda
Washington, D.C. • November 14, 2016

The election of Republican Donald Trump, coupled with the GOP's success in retaining control of Congress, is sure to reshape federal policy for education in significant ways, from preschool to college.

Although Trump spent relatively little time on education in his campaign, he occasionally highlighted the issue, sharply criticizing the Common Core and high student debt and proposing a plan to significantly expand school choice. For its part, Congress has a long to-do list in 2017, including the reauthorization of the Higher Education Act.

How will Trump’s campaign rhetoric and proposals translate into a White House agenda? What will be his top education priorities, and how much political capital will his administration put behind them? What are the prospects for carrying out this agenda in Congress? Who will likely be the key education leaders in his administration?

EWA brings together experts to explore the outcome and what it means for education.

Speakers: 

The National Press Club | Washington, D.C.
November 14, 2016 | 2:00 to 4:00 p.m. (Eastern)

The election of Republican Donald Trump, coupled with the GOP’s success in retaining control of Congress, is sure to reshape federal policy for education in significant ways, from preschool to college.

Although Trump spent relatively little time on education in his campaign, he occasionally highlighted the issue, sharply criticizing the Common Core and high student debt and proposing a plan to significantly expand school choice. For its part, Congress has a long to-do list in 2017, including the reauthorization of the Higher Education Act.

How will Trump’s campaign rhetoric and proposals translate into a White House agenda? What will be his top education priorities, and how much political capital will his administration put behind them? What are the prospects for carrying out this agenda in Congress? Who will likely be the key education leaders in his administration?

EWA brings together experts to explore the outcome and what it means for education.

Speakers: 

The National Press Club | Washington, D.C.
November 14, 2016 | 2:00 to 4:00 p.m. (Eastern)

Blog: The Educated Reporter

How Quickly Could Trump Change Public Education?

It’s shaping up to be a contentious year on the education beat, fueled in part by Donald Trump’s upset victory in the presidential election. For starters, in the days and weeks since his election, his campaign call for expanding school choice has sparked widespread discussion and debate.

Latest News

Trump’s School Choice Expansion Plan May Face Uphill Battle

WASHINGTON — School voucher programs in the nation’s capital and Vice President-elect Mike Pence’s home state of Indiana could serve as a blueprint for a Trump administration plan to use public money to enable disadvantaged students to attend the public or private school of their choice.

President-elect Donald Trump made clear that school choice would be an education priority.

Latest News

School Choice Likely to Top Trump’s Agenda for K-12 Education

What might change in public schools after Donald Trump becomes president in January is anyone’s guess.

But experts and insiders are predicting that education changes will not be a high priority for the Trump administration. During a panel discussion Monday at the National Press Club, several experts said the new administration will likely be more focused on health care and immigration.

If there are changes for education, they will likely come first in higher education, where Trump has promised to privatize student loan programs, some said.

EWA Radio

Is ‘Trump Effect’ Hurting Students?
EWA Radio: Episode 94

Donald Trump speaks at campaign rally.

New York Times best-selling author Dana Goldstein (“The Teacher Wars”) discusses her reporting for Slate on whether Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump’s fiery rhetoric is trickling down into classrooms. Teachers across the country have reported an increase in bullying and other inappropriate behavior. Some organizations – such as the Southern Poverty Law Center and the American Federation of Teachers – say those problems are a direct reflection of the tumultuous political season. But how much of this really starts outside of schools, and what are reasonable expectations for schools to navigate controversial political events? Goldstein offers insights and historical context for teachers who must balance instructional objectivity with their own political views. She also suggests story ideas for reporters covering the issue in local schools. 

Special Topic

Education & the 2016 Elections

Education is a perennial issue in political campaigns, and the 2016 election cycle is proving no exception. In the crowded field of White House candidates, education may not be the dominant issue, but it’s gained a solid foothold. And it’s sure to be a significant factor in other 2016 contests, including those for governor, with a dozen seats up for grabs.