The U.S. Elections & Education: Part 1

(Flickr/Matt Johnson, Wikimedia Commons/Zachary Moskow)
Overview

The U.S. Elections & Education: Part 1
National Press Club • Washington, D.C.
2:00 – 4:00 p.m. • August 30, 2016

Now that the White House race has narrowed to Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, how is education playing out as an issue in the campaign? Will it prove an important fault line between the Democratic and Republican candidates? Will Trump offer any details to contrast with Clinton’s extensive set of proposals from early childhood to higher education? What are the potential implications for schools and colleges depending on who wins the White House? Also, what other races this fall should be on the radar of journalists, whether elections for Congress, state legislatures, or governor?

Join the Education Writers Association and the National Press Club's Newsmaker Committee for a two-hour forum on Tuesday, Aug. 30, designed to help busy education and political journalists better understand and more effectively cover education in the 2016 campaign.

Now that the White House race has narrowed to Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, how is education playing out as an issue in the campaign? Will it prove an important fault line between the Democratic and Republican candidates? Will Trump offer any details to contrast with Clinton’s extensive set of proposals from early childhood to higher education? What are the potential implications for schools and colleges depending on who wins the White House? Also, what other races this fall should be on the radar of journalists, whether elections for Congress, state legislatures, or governor?

Join the Education Writers Association and the National Press Club’s Newsmaker Committee for a two-hour forum on Tuesday, Aug. 30, designed to help busy education and political journalists better understand and more effectively cover education in the 2016 campaign.

EWA Radio

Is ‘Trump Effect’ Hurting Students?
EWA Radio: Episode 94

Donald Trump speaks at campaign rally.

New York Times best-selling author Dana Goldstein (“The Teacher Wars”) discusses her reporting for Slate on whether Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump’s fiery rhetoric is trickling down into classrooms. Teachers across the country have reported an increase in bullying and other inappropriate behavior. Some organizations – such as the Southern Poverty Law Center and the American Federation of Teachers – say those problems are a direct reflection of the tumultuous political season. But how much of this really starts outside of schools, and what are reasonable expectations for schools to navigate controversial political events? Goldstein offers insights and historical context for teachers who must balance instructional objectivity with their own political views. She also suggests story ideas for reporters covering the issue in local schools. 

Multimedia

Higher Ed in the Election
The U.S. Elections & Education: Part 1

Higher Ed in the Election

During the Democratic presidential primaries, the debate was over whether to make public colleges tuition-free or debt-free for students. Now that Democrat Hillary Clinton has picked up the tuition-free banner, how might her proposal affect higher education? Meanwhile, Republican nominee Donald Trump has suggested he might change the federal government’s role in lending to students altogether. Experts address what the candidates’ ideas could mean for colleges and students.

Multimedia

Pre-K-12 Education in the 2016 Race
The U.S. Elections & Education: Part 1

Pre-K-12 Education in the 2016 Race

Experts and advocates assess how early childhood and K-12 education issues are factoring into the presidential campaigns of Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump. They offer analysis of the candidates’ campaign positions and explore the complex politics of education policy. They also discuss other key elections around the nation with big stakes for education.

Post

Clinton Transparent On Education Issues. Trump? Not So Much, Say Experts

Hillary Clinton is the only presidential candidate in the race who has provided an education plan for voters to review and scrutinize, according to panelists during a discussion August 30 at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C.

“You can go to her website and see where she stands,” said NEA President Lily Eskelsen García, one of three panelists at the event sponsored by the Education Writers Association (EWA), a non-profit membership organization of journalists who cover education. “You can’t do that with her opponent.”

Special Topic

Education & the 2016 Elections

Although education did not figure prominently in the 2016 presidential election, the victory of Republican Donald Trump is expected to have important implications for policy and funding across the educational spectrum. The president’s choice for education secretary of Betsy DeVos — who narrowly won confirmation by the Senate — is widely seen as a clear signal that school choice will be a top educational priority of the new administration.