The Story Beyond the Statistics: Covering Latino Education

Overview

The Story Beyond the Statistics: Covering Latino Education
Mas allá de las estadísticas: Reportando sobre la educación de los latinos

September 17, 2015
Valencia College

Hay casi 12 millones de latinos matriculados en las escuelas públicas en los Estados Unidos y la cifra sigue creciendo: Se proyecta que aumentará a 15.6 millones durante la próxima década. Sin embargo, estas cifras no nos presentan la historia completa sobre la educación de los estudiantes latinos. Cada día es más importante entender las estadísticas y reportar lo que realmente está pasando en los salones de clase, y esta labor es especialmente importante para los periodistas que trabajan en los medios de comunicación en español.

El segundo seminario anual de la EWA enfocado en los medios de comunicación en español se efectuará el 17 de septiembre en el Valencia College en Orlando, Florida. Los periodistas que asistan tendrán la oportunidad de aprender de presentadores bilingües, que incluyen educadores, expertos en estadística, periodistas y otros expertos en temas como las tendencias en la educación bilingüe, cómo preparar a los estudiantes latinos para tener éxito académico, estudios étnicos y las instituciones de educación superior que ofrecen servicios a los latinos. La conferencia también incluirá sesiones sobre ideas para cubrir lo que está ocurriendo en la educación de los latinos. Este seminario es de un día y se efectuará totalmente en español.

A los interesados en asistir se les recomienda permanecer en Orlando para asistir también al seminario de la EWA enfocado en la educación superior The Way to Work: Covering the Path from College to Careers  el 18 y 19 de septiembre. Este segundo seminario será totalmente en inglés.

September 17, 2015
Valencia College

Hay casi 12 millones de latinos matriculados en las escuelas públicas en los Estados Unidos y la cifra sigue creciendo: Se proyecta que aumentará a 15.6 millones durante la próxima década. Sin embargo, estas cifras no nos presentan la historia completa sobre la educación de los estudiantes latinos. Cada día es más importante entender las estadísticas y reportar lo que realmente está pasando en los salones de clase, y esta labor es especialmente importante para los periodistas que trabajan en los medios de comunicación en español.

El segundo seminario anual de la EWA enfocado en los medios de comunicación en español se efectuará el 17 de septiembre en el Valencia College en Orlando, Florida. Los periodistas que asistan tendrán la oportunidad de aprender de presentadores bilingües, que incluyen educadores, expertos en estadística, periodistas y otros expertos en temas como las tendencias en la educación bilingüe, cómo preparar a los estudiantes latinos para tener éxito académico, estudios étnicos y las instituciones de educación superior que ofrecen servicios a los latinos. La conferencia también incluirá sesiones sobre ideas para cubrir lo que está ocurriendo en la educación de los latinos. Este seminario es de un día y se efectuará totalmente en español.

A los interesados en asistir se les recomienda permanecer en Orlando para asistir también al seminario de la EWA enfocado en la educación superior The Way to Work: Covering the Path from College to Careers  el 18 y 19 de septiembre. Este segundo seminario será totalmente en inglés.

Around 12 million Latinos are enrolled in U.S. public schools, and that number is only getting bigger: Projections show an increase to 15.6 million over the next decade. But these numbers by themselves can’t tell the full story of the education of Latino students. Understanding the statistics – and getting beyond them to cover what’s really happening in the classroom – is increasingly important, especially for journalists working for the Spanish-language media.

EWA’s second annual Spanish-language media convening will be held on Sept. 17 at Valencia College in Orlando, Fla. Journalist attendees will learn from bilingual educators, statisticians, fellow reporters and other experts about such topics as trends in bilingual education, how to prepare young Latinos for academic success, ethnic studies, and Hispanic-serving institutions. Sessions will also focus on story ideas for covering the Latino education beat. This one-day seminar will be conducted in Spanish.

Prospective attendees are also encouraged to remain in Orlando to attend EWA’s seminar on higher education, “The Way to Work: Covering the Path from College to Careers,” Sept. 18-19.

Blog: Latino Ed Beat

Hispanic-Serving Institutions and Their Roles in Higher Ed

Panelists Alicia Diaz, left, of the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities and Kathleen Plinske, a Valencia College campus president, discussed the roles of Hispanic-serving institutions at EWA's 2015 Spanish-Language Media Convening. The discussion was moderator by Adolfo Guzman-Lopez or Southern California Public Radio. 
Source: Valencia College/ Don Burlinson

In recent years, the United States has seen overall enrollment declines in the numbers of students seeking postsecondary degrees, but in a panel about Latinos in higher education at the Education Writers Association’s second annual Spanish-Language Media Convening, the executive director of the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities reminded journalists of one area of growth: The number of Hispanic-serving institutions is on the rise and accelerating.

Blog: Latino Ed Beat

How Journalists Can Change What TV Says About Latinos

Federico Subervi gives the keynote speech, "Countering Stereotypes and Vacuums: Inspiring and Mobilizing News for 'Sí, Se Puede'" at EWA's 2015 Spanish-Language Media Convening in Orlando. Source: Valencia College/ Don Burlinson

A study in the 1990s found less than 1 percent of the leading English-language TV news broadcast stories were either about or related to Latinos. A similar study, conducted from 2008 to 2014 by retired Kent State University journalism professor Federico Subervi, found there was no change in that number.

Blog: Latino Ed Beat

Valuing Both Spanish and English in the Classroom

Maria Fernanda Lopez of Univision talks about her experiences covering the topic of bilingual education. She was joined on the panel by Nelson Flores of the University of Pennsylvania, left, and Rachel Hazlehurst of Camino Nuevo Charter Academy. 
Source: Valencia College/ Don Burlinson

Children don’t have to lose one language to learn another language. That’s the theory behind dual-language programs, which are replacing traditional English as a second language (ESL) courses in schools across the country.

Blog: Latino Ed Beat

Cultural Values and the Path to Early Academic Success

Selma Caal of Child Trends Hispanic Institute, Paulina Sodi of Telemundo Houston, and José Lizárraga of the University of California, Berkeley participated in a panel discussion on educating young Latinos during the 2015 Spanish-Language Media Convening in Orlando on Sept. 17. Source: Twitter/ via @PaulinaSodi

Latino children enter kindergarten with socioemotional skills that are on par and sometimes even better than their non-Latino peers’ abilities. This means they’re on track in their capability to make friends and behave in school. But Latinos also have a greater probability of arriving to their first day of classes behind their peers academically.

Blog: Latino Ed Beat

Latino Student Progress Means U.S. Educational Progress

(Flickr/www.audio-luci-store.it)

President Barack Obama has made it a goal to produce more college graduates than any other nation in the world. In the opening session of the Education Writers Association’s second annual Spanish-Language Media Convening, Modesto Abety-Gutierrez presented a picture of the Latino student population in the United States. Abety-Gutierrez is a member of the President’s Advisory Commission on Educational Excellence for Hispanics.