Past Events

Webinar

Summer Story Ideas: Local Angles on Federal Issues
Trump Budget, ESSA, Pell Grants ... and More!

Summer Story Ideas: Local Angles on Federal Issues

School’s out, but there’s no shortage of compelling summer stories to pursue on the education beat.

How might President Trump’s proposed budget cuts for education impact summer learning programs? How is your state incorporating summer learning into its revamped accountability plan under the federal Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA)? What’s the latest on summer Pell Grants?

Webinar

“3 in 30”- Three Stories to Steal on Digital Learning
Friday, May 12, 1:00-1:30 p.m. ET

Looking to liven up your coverage of classroom technology and how it’s playing out in your local schools? Join Nichole Dobo of The Hechinger Report and EWA public editor Emily Richmond for an “express” 30-minute webinar on digital learning and classroom technology. You’ll come away with ideas for quick-hit daily stories, data-driven takeouts and enterprise reporting. Plus, get the inside scoop on how to make the most of EWA’s newest Topics Page on Digital Learning & Technology.

Space is limited! Sign up today to reserve your spot.

Webinar

“3 in 30” – Three Stories to Steal on Digital Learning

Looking to liven up your coverage of classroom technology and how it’s playing out in your local schools? Join Nichole Dobo of The Hechinger Report and EWA public editor Emily Richmond for an “express” 30-minute webinar on digital learning and classroom technology. You’ll come away with ideas for quick-hit daily stories, data-driven takeouts and enterprise reporting. Plus, get the inside scoop on how to make the most of EWA’s newest Topics Page on Digital Learning & Technology.

Watch the Replay:

“3 in 30” – Three Stories to Steal on Digital Learning

Webinar

Covering ESSA Accountability in the Trump Era

Covering ESSA Accountability in the Trump Era

With states revamping their school accountability systems under the federal Every Student Succeeds Act, recent actions by Congress and the Trump administration raise important questions about what’s ahead. First, the Senate last week narrowly approved a bill to repeal ESSA accountability rules issued by the Obama administration. (President Donald Trump is expected to sign the measure.) Also, U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos just issued new ESSA guidelines for states.

Seminar

Doing More With Higher Ed Data: From Policy to Newsrooms
Philadelphia • February 2–3, 2017

With colleges and universities under increased pressure to ensure that more students earn degrees without amassing mountains of debt, journalists are at the forefront in examining how these institutions  measure up. But there’s one major obstacle that both colleges and reporters share when it comes to making sense of how well these schools are meeting their goals: insufficient data.

Webinar

Measuring the Soft Skills: What Reporters Need to Know

Measuring the Soft Skills: What Reporters Need to Know

Should schools measure skills like cooperation, communication, self-confidence and the ability to organize? Efforts to gauge these so-called “soft skills” are gaining traction in the classroom, especially with the passage of the Every Student Succeeds Act. The new federal law calls on states and school districts to incorporate at least one measure beyond test scores and graduation rates in their accountability systems.

Webinar

New PISA Results: Putting U.S. Achievement in Global Context

New PISA Results: Putting U.S. Achievement in Global Context

How will the U.S. fare against other countries when the results from the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) are released Dec. 6? At our reporters-only webinar, get advance, embargoed access to the full report, as well as an opportunity to ask questions about the findings from a leader at the Paris-based Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development.

Webinar

An Insider’s Guide to International Test Results

An Insider’s Guide to International Test Results

Get ready. A fresh wave of global test results for dozens of nations is about to hit U.S. shores. Outcomes from two major exams will be issued just days apart: TIMSS on Nov. 29. PISA on Dec. 6.

Once again, we’ll get a snapshot of how U.S. students stack up against their peers overseas in key subjects, including math, reading, and science. And we’ll hear lots of rhetoric about what it all means.

Seminar

Election 2016: New President, New Education Agenda
Washington, D.C. • November 14, 2016

The election of Republican Donald Trump is sure to reshape federal policy for education in significant ways, from prekindergarten to college, especially coupled with the GOP’s retaining control of Congress.

Although Trump spent relatively little time on education in his campaign, he did highlight the issue from time to time, from his sharp criticism of the Common Core and high student debt loads to proposing a plan to significantly expand school choice. And Congress has a long to-do list, including reauthorization of the Higher Education Act.

Seminar

Higher Ed 2016
September 16–17 • Tempe, Arizona

What new techniques and practices should higher education embrace to ensure that more students graduate? Join the Education Writers Association September 16–17 at Arizona State University to explore cutting-edge innovations that aim to address financial, academic, and social barriers. More on the seminar theme.

This annual seminar is one of the largest gatherings of journalists covering postsecondary education. Network with others covering this beat and step up your coverage for the upcoming academic year.

Arizona State University
Tempe, Arizona
Seminar

The U.S. Elections & Education: Part 1
Washington, D.C. • August 30, 2016

Now that the White House race has narrowed to Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, how is education playing out as an issue in the campaign? Will it prove an important fault line between the Democratic and Republican candidates? Will Trump offer any details to contrast with Clinton’s extensive set of proposals from early childhood to higher education? What are the potential implications for schools and colleges depending on who wins the White House? Also, what other races this fall should be on the radar of journalists, whether elections for Congress, state legislatures, or governor?

Webinar

More Than Scores: How to Cover Teacher Evaluation

More Than Scores: How to Cover Teacher Evaluation

Over the past decade, many states and school districts have overhauled the way they evaluate teachers. Some rely primarily on test scores; others add classroom observations. Some even bring student surveys into the mix. Meanwhile, new federal leeway may spark a fresh round of changes around the country.

What are some practical ways for journalists to write about the evaluation systems in the school districts they cover? What questions should they ask about design, implementation, training, and teacher attitudes toward the evaluations?

Webinar

NAEP Data: Beat Reporters’ Secret Weapon

NAEP Data: Beat Reporters’ Secret Weapon

Most education reporters at one time or another cover test results on NAEP, known as “the nation’s report card.” But if that’s all you do, you’re missing out on a powerful tool that can complement your daily reporting.

Seminar

Equidad en la educación: Lo que eso significa para estudiantes latinos
Tercera conferencia anual sobre medios de comunicación de la EWA

El término “equidad” es usado comúnmente por educadores, legisladores y otros para indicar el concepto de una educación justa o en la que la oportunidad está bien distribuida. Aunque no es fácil de medir, los estudiantes de minoría, los de hogares de pocos ingresos y los que están aprendiendo inglés a menudo enfrentan desigualdad en el salón de clases, como por ejemplo menos maestros de alta calidad, menos recursos, acceso limitado a clases avanzadas y mayor dificultad para obtener un diploma universitario.

Washington, DC
Webinar

School’s (Still) In: Smart Story Ideas on Summer Learning

School’s (Still) In: Smart Story Ideas on Summer Learning

While students are celebrating the start of the long summer break, there’s a significant tradeoff for the three months of leisure – on average, students will return to school in the fall a month behind where they performed in the spring. And the learning loss is even greater for low-income students, who are often already behind their better-off peers.

Webinar

On Target? Following Federal K-12 Aid for Poor Students

On Target? Following Federal K-12 Aid for Poor Students

As part of its effort to help close the achievement gap for disadvantaged students, the U.S. government spends more than $14 billion annually through the Title I program. But a sizable share of those billions go to affluent school systems. Why do some high-poverty districts receive less federal Title I aid than those that serve a far smaller proportion of low-income students? This week, U.S. News & World Report released an exclusive investigation on the federal funding stream.

Seminar

69th EWA National Seminar

The Education Writers Association, the national professional organization for journalists who cover education, is thrilled to announce that its annual conference will take place from Sunday, May 1, through Tuesday, May 3, 2016, in the historic city of Boston.

Co-hosted by Boston University’s College of Communication and School of Education, EWA’s 69th National Seminar will examine a wide array of timely topics in education — from early childhood through career — while expanding and sharpening participants’ skills in reporting and storytelling.

Boston, Massachusetts
Seminar

College Readiness: What Does It Mean for Higher Ed?

“College and career readiness” has become the rallying cry for what high schools should aim to achieve for their graduates. But large numbers of students still arrive on college campuses needing remedial courses, and many of those who are academically ready still struggle to adapt to college and earn their degrees.

Sheraton Los Angeles Downtown Hotel
711 S Hope St, Los Angeles, CA 90017
Seminar

What’s Next Out West?: Education Stories to Watch in 2016
Special Afternoon Event for Communications Professionals in California

(Flickr/Sid10)

Join the Education Writers Association for a lively conversation with leading education journalists on the stories to watch in 2016. Amid major changes in the national policy landscape, key questions are on the table for educators, policymakers, and students: In this presidential election year, how are the fault lines over K-12 school reform shifting? What higher education trends have the most momentum? What’s in store for our littlest learners? And how will battles over politics and policy affect what happens in the classroom — from preschool through graduate school?

Sheraton Los Angeles Downtown Hotel
711 S Hope St, Los Angeles, CA 90017
Seminar

Teaching & Testing in the Common Core Era

(Bigstock)

Despite persistent political debates, the Common Core State Standards are now a classroom reality in public schools across the country. Yet much is in flux as educators wrestle with how best to teach the Common Core — or their own state’s version of it — and some states rethink the tests tied to the new K-12 standards.   

Sheraton Los Angeles Downtown Hotel
711 S Hope St, Los Angeles, CA 90017
Webinar

Covering Common Core in the Classroom

Covering Common Core in the Classroom

Despite continued debate over the Common Core, the standards are now a classroom reality for thousands of schools across more than 40 states. But what exactly does that mean? What does it look like in action? How is implementation going? Two journalists who have dug into Common Core implementation offer fresh angles on coverage, as well as suggestions on how to interview parents, teachers and students about their experiences with the standards.

Webinar

Exclusive Access: Education Week’s ‘Quality Counts’ 2016

Exclusive Access: Education Week’s ‘Quality Counts’ 2016

EWA journalist members received an early opportunity to review Education Week’s newest Quality Counts report, which includes a special focus on school accountability.

As part of its annual Quality Counts report, Education Week grades states on a wide range of indicators, including the Chance-for-Success Index, K-12 Achievement Index, and school finance.

Webinar

Goodbye, No Child Left Behind: What Happens Now?

Following congressional passage of a bipartisan bill to overhaul federal K-12 policy, the action will quickly shift to states and local school districts. Although the new federal law maintains required testing each year in grades 3-8 and once in high school, it significantly scales back accountability demands, handing states far more leeway on issues such as teacher evaluations and low-performing schools. How will states and districts respond?

Webinar

Showdown on Campus: When Press Freedom and Protests Collide

Tim Tai, a student photographer on assignment for ESPN,  films in a public area, and student activist groups confront him. (Wikipedia/Screen capture from video by Mark Schierbecker)

Across the nation, racial tensions  are spilling onto quads and front pages as student protesters demand that their colleges do more to ensure students of all races and ethnicities feel welcome on campus. But in some cases, it’s not just university administrators who face scrutiny: Journalists also have drawn the ire of protesters demanding improved campus climates.

Webinar

Education At a Glance 2015
Embargoed Access to OECD’s New Report

Flickr/Nicolas Raymond

How does the United States compare to other countries when it comes to spending on early childhood, K-12, and higher education? Where are the greatest inequalities, and what are the potential consequences for individuals’ earning potential, as well as communities and national economies? What cuts have been made to school workforces and resources in the lingering wake of the recession?

The answers to these questions and more are in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development’s forthcoming “Education at a Glance 2015” report.

Seminar

New Lens on Learning: The Hidden Value of Motivation, Grit and Engagement

Many economists warn that the path to jobs is getting harder, as old industries get eclipsed by disruptive technologies and new fields arise that call for new skills. The task for schools is hardly simple: overhaul a system designed for the industrial age so that it prepares young people to thrive in the information age. While education alone is unlikely to address the country’s changing needs, scholars and educators are increasingly looking to concepts like grit, motivation and learning from mistakes to propel a new generation of students to become tomorrow’s talented workers.

Webinar

Seven Challenges First-Generation College Students Face & How to Write About Them

(Bigstock/michaeljung)

While many first-generation students are excited and ambitious when they step on campus — eager to beat the odds and become the first in their families to earn a college degree — others struggle with guilt, fear and loneliness, sometimes even struggling to remember why they decided to attend college in the first place. And they grapple with these feelings while they also have to figure out how to apply for financial aid, register for classes, and manage the other necessities of undergraduate life knowing they can’t turn to their families for guidance based on experience.

Seminar

In the Neighborhood: Covering Poverty’s Influence on Education
Seminar on Poverty & Education

Bigstock

There’s no question that living in a neighborhood with concentrated poverty and racial isolation can take a big toll on children’s learning. But how can journalists go deeper to better understand — and convey to readers — the educational challenges posed when families don’t have enough money for food, heat and other essentials, and often encounter the trauma of neighborhood violence? How can stories get beyond the stereotypes and statistics to put a human face on the circumstances of children in highly impoverished neighborhoods, and how those are translating into the classroom?

Seminar

2015 Higher Ed Seminar
The Way to Work: Covering the Path from College to Careers

More knowledge. More skill. More potential. No matter what reason a student enrolls in college, the ultimate goal is usually the same: a degree that will expand opportunities. But for many students, earning a degree and finding work in their chosen field may pose stark and unanticipated challenges. And for many of their communities, turning colleges and universities into reliable places to find qualified candidates for the jobs that are available may prove easier said than done.

Orlando, Florida
Seminar

Mas allá de las Estadísticas: Reportando Sobre la Educación de los Latinos
Latino Ed 2015

Hay casi 12 millones de latinos matriculados en las escuelas públicas en los de Estados Unidos y la cifra sigue creciendo: Se proyecta que aumentará a 15.6 millones durante la próxima década. Sin embargo, estas cifras no nos presentan la historia completa sobre la educación de los estudiantes latinos. Cada día es más importante entender las estadísticas y reportar lo que realmente está pasando en los salones de clase, y esta labor es especialmente importante para los periodistas que trabajan en los medios de comunicación en español.

Orlando, Florida
Webinar

Webinar on School District Finance & Bonds
Bonding Over School Data: Finding District Finance Stories Through Bond Records

Webinar on School District Finance & Bonds

What’s your district’s financial outlook?

Often that’s a tricky question, requiring a lot of digging through multiple sources. But if the district recently issued bonds, you have a wealth of information at your fingertips. That’s because the financial laws governing the bond market require districts to share a wide range of information (including details they may want to keep quiet).

Webinar

Don’t Know Much About History?
Webinar on Civics Education

Paradise Valley Folklife Project collection, 1978-1982 (AFC 1991/021), American Folklife Center, Library of Congress

Most U.S. students continue to have a weak grasp of civics, as well as U.S. history and geography, recent national data suggest. Only about one-quarter of 8th graders, for instance, scored “proficient” or higher in civics on the latest exam from NAEP, known as the “nation’s report card.”

Webinar

Escaping the Ordinary: The Best Back-to-School Story Ideas
Back-to-School Webinar

Escaping the Ordinary: The Best Back-to-School Story Ideas

For education reporters, coming up with fresh angles for back-to-school stories is an annual challenge. Two veteran education journalists—Steve Drummond (NPR) and Beth Hawkins (MinnPost)—share smart tips for digging deep, and keeping ahead of the curve on the latest trends. We discuss new ways of approaching the first day of school, ideas for unique profiles, strategies for data projects and how to make the most of your publication’s multimedia resources. 

Speakers

Webinar

Is It Bon Voyage For No Child Left Behind?
Webinar on Federal Policy

(Flickr/Patrick)

Education Week reporter Lauren Camera, David DeSchryver, senior vice president of Whiteboard Advisors, and Bethany Little, principal at Education Counsel, break down the future of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act for journalists.

Now that both the Senate and the House of Representatives have passed bills renewing the act, journalists can examine the potential impact of the new provisions. Learn how you can cover these in your state and district and find out questions you should be asking.

Speakers

Seminar

2015 Diving Into Data Workshop

If you want to learn the skills to push your reporting on numbers to the next level, apply now to EWA’s Diving Into Data Workshop, a four-day seminar on collecting and analyzing data at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. The data workshop is meant to encourage reporters to be more active with data-based reporting, whether for quick-hit stories or longer projects.

Webinar

Summer Learning Story Ideas

Flickr/Jessica Lucia

School is out, and you’re sitting in your office wondering what to write about. EWA can help!

On Tuesday, June 9, EWA held a webinar on summer learning with literacy experts Sarah Pitcock of the National Summer Learning Association and Judy Blankenship Cheatham of Reading Is Fundamental.

Seminar

Data at your Desk Seminar in Chicago
An AERA-EWA Data Fellowship Program for Journalists

The Education Writers Association and American Educational Research Association are joining forces to offer a fellowship program for journalists interested in broadening their understanding of education data. Reporters and editors chosen for the fellowships will attend an intensive joint data workshop, as well as data-oriented sessions at EWA’s 68th National Seminar hosted by The University of Chicago and AERA’s 2015 Annual Meeting in the Windy City.

Chicago, Ill.
Webinar

New OECD Report on Gender Disparities in Education
Exclusive, Embargoed Access for Journalist Members

New OECD Report on Gender Disparities in Education

With gender equity on the front burner of public debate, a new report from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development provides a timely glimpse at the issue through the lens of public schools. The report, based on new analysis of the most recent PISA assessment, includes specific data on gender disparities in achievement by U.S. students.

Webinar

How Many Students Graduate From College in Your State?
Early Access to NSCRC Report

How Many Students Graduate From College in Your State?

As students look to curb the amount of loan debt they build on their way to a degree and policymakers eye the need for more college-educated workers, the focus on college graduation rates continues to increase. But exactly how many students actually earn a postsecondary degree can be a difficult question to answer because most data sources lose track of students as they swirl from one college to another, in and out of higher education as “life gets in the way.”

Webinar

EWA Hosts Sneak Preview of National Report on Early Childhood Indicators
Journalist Only Webinar

EWA Hosts Sneak Preview of National Report on Early Childhood Indicators

Journalists will get an early opportunity this week to review Education Week’s newest Quality Counts report, which includes a special focus on early childhood education indicators. The report will evaluate states on their efforts to expand early childhood education and examine how new academic demands and accountability pressures are altering the learning environment for young children. Join EWA for a Jan. 7 webinar to learn more.

Webinar

Are Teachers Data-Savvy?
Webinar on Student Data

Are Teachers Data-Savvy?

As tools and data profiles of students become easier to use, are teachers sufficiently data literate to make sense of the information at their fingertips? Do teachers have the skills and access to data in useful formats, and are the school leaders and institutions responsible for their professional development providing them the training they need? The stakes are high: Teachers behind in data literacy may miss out on innovative ways to track student progress, personalize instruction, and improve their own practice.

Webinar

Inquiring Minds: What Is (And Isn’t) Student-Centered Learning?
EWA Webinar on Student-Centered Learning

Inquiring Minds: What Is (And Isn’t) Student-Centered Learning?

Student-centered learning is gaining ground nationally as a strategy to rethink classroom instruction, setting new expectations for schooling as a collaborative effort. The approach is seen as holding great potential, but also poses significant challenges for teachers and students alike.

What does it look like in practice? What does research suggest are the key elements for making it successful? How can reporters evaluate whether the programs in their own communities are of high quality? 

Presenters

Webinar

Merit System? Covering Colleges’ Choices on Financial Aid
An EWA University Webinar

Merit System? Covering Colleges’ Choices on Financial Aid

Who deserves money for college more: students whose test scores and grades qualify them for “merit aid” or students with greater financial need who might be unable to afford college otherwise? New research suggests that colleges might increasingly be favoring less-needy students, in a quest to boost their schools’ rankings and help their bottom lines. Does that finding hold up to scrutiny? And how do colleges’ decisions on need-based versus merit aid affect college enrollment and completion?

Seminar

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: Covering the College Student Experience
2014 Higher Ed Seminar

For many college students — whether fresh out of high school or adults returning to school — their most serious obstacles to a degree won’t be homework or tests, but rather the challenges of navigating student life. Colleges are now being forced to face the longstanding problems that have often led to students’ flailing and failing on their own. 

Seminar

From Preescolar to Postsecundaria
Covering Latino Education

This fall, the share of K-12 students in the United States who are Latino is projected to climb to nearly one quarter, a figure expected to rise to nearly 30 percent by 2022. And proportionately more Hispanic students are enrolling in postsecondary education than white, non-Hispanic students.

Seminar

Diving Into Data Workshop

Data journalism is more than just reporting on numbers.  It’s taking the records of a half-million students and uncovering alarming absentee rates. It’s tracking the attrition of students from neighborhood schools.

Seminar

STEM and Beyond: Strengthening the Skills of Students and Journalists

Photo credit: Mikhail Zinshteyn

As policy and political leaders sound the alarm on America’s dwindling competitive edge, it’s up to journalists to vet those claims and examine the measures used to gauge whether U.S. students are prepared to thrive in the 21st century economy. Central to the debate over the country’s international standing is the question of whether the U.S. education system is up to par in the STEM fields of science, technology, engineering, and math.

Seminar

Higher Ed Seminar 2012

Degrees vs. Debt: Making College More Affordable

How much should students have to pay to earn a postsecondary degree? At EWA’s 2012 Higher Education Seminar, leading experts took a range of approaches to this question, which has vexed students, administrators and policymakers. This journalists-only event was hosted by the Indiana University School of Education and Indiana University-Purdue University-Indianapolis.

Webinar

Follow the Money: Digging Into School District Finances

When it comes to school district finances, the numbers aren’t easy to add up. But tracking and analyzing this information is a powerful tool to drive smart news coverage. 

Veteran education journalist Tawnell Hobbs of The Wall Street Journal shares tips and tricks for digging into district operating budgets and actual expenditures, as well as salary databases, overtime requests, check registers and credit card accounts, purchase orders, and more. Learn how to evaluate fiscal data that’s readily available and make the most of open records requests. 

Seminar

68th National Seminar
Costs and Benefits: Covering the Economics of Education

EWA’s National Seminar will gather some 500 journalists, experts, and supporting community members for dozens of sessions, including standalone speakers, panel discussions, how-to workshops, and visits to sites of interest. With its focus on financial issues, the National Seminar will arm attendees with new ideas for compelling stories on everything from salary schedules and bond issues to the burdens on families struggling to pay for preschool or college. At the same time, it will sharpen participants’ skills at making the most of their resources for producing high-quality coverage.

Seminar

Covering Standards and Testing in the Common Core Era
Seminar for Journalist Members Only

This academic year marks a critical juncture for the Common Core, as most states gear up to assess students on the shared standards for the first time. Are states, districts, and schools ready? What about states that are reviewing or have rescinded the standards? How can reporters make sense of it all? There’s no shortage of compelling angles to pursue in this complex and fast-evolving story—rendered  all the more so by the political tussles erupting over the new standards and tests. 

Seminar

Charters & Choice: Making Sense of the Fast-Evolving Landscape in K-12 Education
Journalist-Only Seminar

Charter schools. Vouchers. Education tax credits. The “portfolio” model of schooling in cities. It’s nearly impossible to find consensus on these hot-button issues, but one thing is clear: American families are seeing more school options at the K-12 level than ever before, especially in urban areas. And the Republican gains in the 2014 elections at the federal and state levels are widely expected to provide further impetus for expanding school choice.

Seminar

Bursting the Bubbles: Reassessing Assessment

Since the advent of No Child Left Behind 12 years ago, standardized, fill-in-the-bubble tests have become a major part of the school experience. Some say too much of a part. 

But beyond the debate over how much schools test, major changes are under way in how they test. Underlying those changes are questions about just what they’re testing for.   

Seminar

The Push to Upgrade the Teaching Profession

This intensive, journalists-only seminar will focus on a range of hard-fought changes under way that together are rewriting the rules of the U.S. teaching profession. What are the roots of today’s controversies over teacher training, tenure, evaluation and pay? In a pivotal year in the push for new standards and tests, are teachers still on board?  What does the nation’s new majority-minority student population mean for classroom teachers? How are teacher colleges responding to new accountability pressures?

Webinar

Where Is Your State Hiding Vital Education Data?

Dakarai Aarons and Elizabeth Dabney of Data Quality Campaign will identify the various state and local government agencies storing education data that are vital for your reporting. In many states, the state school board, department of education, mayor’s office, higher-education advisory board, and other agencies keep useful public information – and it’s on the reporter to know where to look. 

Webinar

Getting to Degrees: New Research on College Completion Data

How many students are really graduating from college? This number is becoming more important as policymakers look to tie university funding to completion rates. But as more students start to “swirl”—take extended time off or transfer into another institution, acts that eliminate them from many traditional measures of college graduation –what’s the best way to keep track of which students actually earned degrees?

Seminar

Recap: Common Core at the Crossroads

Growing public distrust, cagey lawmakers and big money from all directions—it’s not just the standards and assessments that are common in the roll out of the Common Core State Standards.

Despite the pushback, the standards are fast becoming a reality across the country. What does that mean for education and the journalists who cover it? Are the standards making a dramatic difference in the way teachers work? How well have school districts planned their curricula around Common Core?

Seminar

Recap: Assessing the Future of Teacher Evaluations

More than 50 reporters joined EWA for our seminar “More Than Scores: Assessing the Future of Teacher Evaluations,” held Oct. 10th and 11th at the University of Chicago. As always, we look forward to the coverage inspired by the event. So far, we know about the following stories:

Webinar

Keeping Up With Common Core: Will Learning Soar or Stall?

News coverage of the process and politics surrounding the Common Core State Standards has become relatively plentiful. But less attention has been paid to the longer-lasting instructional changes that are already affecting students and teachers. To address that gap, EWA hosted this event with top experts on the shifts in math and literacy instruction that the standards are designed to bring about. Consider this your intro class to the new Common Core content.

Webinar

Principal Ideas: Stories on School Leaders
67 minutes

Even the most talented teacher will be less successful under a bad principal. But how do you cover what really matters about principal leadership? This webinar offers five “story ideas to steal” and spark your own ideas for compelling coverage. As a launch pad for the discussion, the webinar will feature clips from the recent documentary “The Principal Story.”

Webinar

Q&A with Arne Duncan
37 minutes

Across the country, tens of millions of students are back in class for a new school year. But while the ritual of hitting the books is the same, changes are occurring in everything from K-12 curricula to how college students earn their degrees. If you’re writing about these shifts in our nation’s schools and universities, this free, journalists-only event will give you better context for your coverage.

Panelists:

  • Arne Duncan, U.S. Secretary of Education
  • Emily Richmond, EWA Public Editor (Moderator)
Seminar

Creativity Counts: Innovation in Education and the Media

EWA’s 66th National Seminar

Note: Only sessions with multimedia or associated reading are listed on this page. 

Thursday, May 2

Site Visit

Blended Learning Takes Off. Rocketship was founded in 2006 as the first elementary blended-learning school model in the country, and has become both the highest-growth charter school system in the country and the highest-performing low-income school system in California.

Coverage

Webinar

Crawling to a Consensus: Can States and the White House Agree on Early Ed?
76 minutes

Research has shown that early education programs can significantly improve learning outcomes for the nation’s poorest students. With President Obama announcing a proposal to expand early education in the United States dramatically, interest in child care and pre-K has surged. But not all programs work effectively and states have had varying success implementing large-scale early-ed models. Can a national plan to enroll millions of children from low-income households in quality pre-K classes complement what’s working at the state level?

Webinar

School’s (Still) In: Making the Most of Summer Learning
1 hour

While students are celebrating the start of the long summer break, there’s a significant tradeoff for the three months of leisure – on average, students will return to school in the fall a month behind where they performed in the spring. And the learning loss is even greater for low-income students who were already behind their more affluent peers. In this EWA Webinar, we examine how districts are successfully combating summer learning loss with high-quality programs and leveraging community partnerships to help pay for them.

Webinar

Education at a Glance 2013: EWA/OECD Webinar
55 minutes

How much of the U.S. gross domestic product is spent on education? How does that education spending break down for early childhood education, K-12 education and higher education? How much private spending is dedicated to education, compared to public spending? What is the link between higher education degrees and unemployment rates in the U.S. and other countries?

Webinar

STEM Stepping-Stones: Covering College Prep in the Summer
1 hour

What steps are under way to help incoming college freshmen prepare for their first semester of classes, particularly those in the STEM disciplines? Students planning to major in science, technology, engineering and math often make early exits from those fields, but switching a college major can be costly for the student and may even lead to dropping out altogether. From summer bridge programs that refresh rising freshmen on key concepts to learning communities that pair students and mentors, programs are emerging to help high school graduates enter college STEM courses prepared.

Webinar

Beyond Victims and Villains: Covering Bullying and Suicide
1 hour

In the wake of several high-profile cases involving students who took their own lives, states are focusing heavily on making bullying prevention programs mandatory in public schools. But how much of the responsibility really rests with educators, and what steps should the broader community be taking to help students make smarter choices about their own behavior on campus, after school, and online?

Webinar

What’s the Price? ‘Pay As You Earn’ and Income-Based Repayment
57 minutes

Who will benefit more from the federal government’s new “Pay As You Earn” income-based repayment program for student loans: Recent graduates struggling to find jobs in a tough economy? Or high-paid professionals such as lawyers and business executives, who might be able to wipe away tens of thousands of dollars of student loan debt? Why are the income-based repayment options so underused when as many as one out of five borrowers has fallen behind on payments?

Webinar

Giving Guidance: Counselors’ Role in College and Career Readiness
1 hour

When it comes to making sure students are college and career ready, middle and high school guidance counselors play a critical — and often underreported — role.In this EWA webinar, attendees received an advance look at the College Board Advocacy & Policy Center’s second-annual survey of guidance counselors, in which respondents outlined some of the challenges of helping students meet ever-increasing expectations, as well as identified shortfalls in their own training and professional development.In this recording, you’ll  also hear from experts in the field as to the implications

Seminar

2012 Teachers Seminar

Ready to Teach: Rethinking Routes to the Classroom

How well is America teaching its teachers?

As accountability pressures on the nation’s teaching force mount, scrutiny of colleges of education is intensifying as well. During this one-day EWA seminar, journalists and experts delved into the growing efforts to revamp how aspiring educators are prepared for the classroom and how teacher-preparation programs are held accountable for results.

Seminar

Finding Common Ground: Common Core and ELLs
What Common Core Standards Mean for English Language Learners

Several urban districts and some states are quickly translating Common Core proficiencies into new teaching practices and more complex classroom activities. This represents a sharp departure from the “basic skills” drilling experienced by many English-language learners under high-stakes accountability policies.

Webinar

Diving into Data: Requesting (and Analyzing) Public School Numbers
53 minutes

After you’ve filed your back-to-school stories, get ready make waves with some hard-hitting, data-based reporting this academic year. If you’ve never parsed test scores, attendance numbers or graduation rates, this webinar is a great place to start.

Jack Gillum, an investigative reporter with the Associated Press, offers tips on how to use data to enhance your reporting; find the information to get you started; and identify newsworthy trends in the numbers. Gillum contributed to an award-winning 2011 USA Today series on suspicious student test score gains in Washington, D.C.

Webinar

Back To School: Finding Fresh Angles on Familiar Ground
1 hour

For education reporters, coming up with fresh ideas for back-to-school stories is an annual challenge. As part of EWA’s Summer School Webinar series, we invite you to get some smart tips from three veteran journalists who know how to mine the beat, and avoid the ordinary. We discuss new ways of approaching the first day of school, ideas for unique profiles, and how to make the most of your publication’s multimedia resources.

Webinar

Follow the Money: What’s Hiding In Your School District’s Spending?
56 minutes

Follow the Money: What’s Hiding In Your School District’s Spending?

So you’ve managed to get your hands on all the records your school district keeps about its budget and spending. Now what? How can you turn a giant data dump into a compelling story for your readers?

In this EWA webinar, you’ll hear how reporters at the Dallas Morning News used public records to create databases of district spending and budget information, and how they used those databases to uncover everything from fraud and mismanagement to cozy vendor-employee relationships to the misuse of federal grants.

Seminar

65th National Seminar – Learning from Leaders: What Works for Stories and Schools

EWA held its 65th National Seminar in Philadelphia May 17-19. The conference featured roughly 120 speakers and 40 sessions. 

The sessions are featured chronologically. We will continue to update as we obtain more materials.

*Names that contain a hyperlink open up to a video, PowerPoint, or PDF

Photos from the National Seminar

Thursday, May 17

Site Visit – Tackling Turnarounds: Mastery Charter Schools

Webinar

Summer Idyll — or Idle? Story Ideas for Journalists
58 Minutes

All over the country, the year’s last school bell is ringing. But now that it’s time for pool parties and summer camp, what happens to the knowledge students gained during the school year?

Gary Huggins of National Summer Learning Association; Kathleen Manzo of Education Week; and Katy Murphy of the Oakland Tribune talk about how reporters can examine summer learning loss and how to tell when schools and communities offer effective summer school.

Seminar

School Improvement Grants Seminar

Turnaround Schools: Are SIG Dollars Making a Difference?

Since 2009, the federal government has poured more than $4.6 billion into the School Improvement Grants program, one of the most ambitious attempts at education reform in recent history.

Our March 24, 2012 seminar at the University of Chicago took a close look at the federal School Improvement Grant program, the research base behind school turnarounds, and how charter schools factor into attempts to reimagine and reform chronically low-performing schools.

Webinar

Deciding Diversity: The Supreme Court Reconsiders Affirmative Action
53 minutes

This fall, the U.S. Supreme Court will take on the issue of affirmative action in college admissions for the first time since 2003. The plaintiff in Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin argues that her race was the deciding factor when she was denied admission to the school. Regardless of the outcome, this case will have major consequences for schools around the country for years to come.

Seminar

Diving Into Data 2012

EWA Seminar on Data-Based Journalism

What can you conclude about the teacher-turnover rates in your local schools? What is the relationship between students’ family backgrounds and high school graduation rates? Which schools are beating the demographic odds in student learning growth? Do students’ grades in your local high schools line up with their need for remediation in college?

Webinar

Mining the Data: What States Have and Where to Find It
58 minutes

Elizabeth Laird, Director of Communications and External Affairs for the Data Quality Campaign, provides an update on states’ progress toward collecting and using education data and reveals the type of data and related reports available from your states. She’ll especially concentrate on linking K-12 and postsecondary data to explore issues like college and career readiness, college remediation, and other topics.

Webinar

Freelancing 101: How to Thrive as an Independent Education Writer
1 hour

Are you interested in freelancing, but don’t know how to get started? Veteran journalist David McKay Wilson offers a primer for reporters new to freelancing and those who want to learn the ropes of this exciting career path. Wilson broke into journalism as a freelancer for the Boston Phoenix and continued to freelance over his 26-year career. He left Gannett’s The Journal News in 2007 after 21 years to launch a business that focuses primarily on publications at institutions of higher education.

Webinar

Do the Math: Outsmarting Statistics

No one ever entered the journalism profession to crunch numbers, but dealing with data is a crucial part of the education beat. Holly Hacker, statistics guru and education reporter for the Dallas Morning News, shows you the basics for understanding how to effectively report on statistics.

Webinar

Homeless Students: Covering the School Safety Net
1 Hour, 3 minutes

From Maine to California, school districts are reporting significant increases in the number of homeless students. Our webinar takes a closer look at the underlying issues, and also gives participants a blueprint for localizing this important story. Our presenters will include Barbara Duffield, policy director of the National Association for the Education of Homeless Children; Pamela Hosmer, Program Manager for the San Diego Unified School District’s Children and Youth in Transition program; and Dr.

Webinar

Behind the Numbers: What the SAT Scores Really Say
49 minutes

States love to brag when their SAT scores go up, and are quick to offer reasons why they went down. How can reporters see through the spin and put their states in context?

Holly Hacker, education reporter and stats guru at the Dallas Morning News, explains some basic statistical concepts using state SAT scores, showing you the biggest force driving those scores to help effectively and fairly compare your state with all the others.

While this webinar is focused on the SAT, these techniques are applicable to many other education issues.

Webinar

Teacher Evaluations: A State-by-State Overview and Lessons From Early Adopters
1 hour 3 minutes

In advance of its 2011 State Teacher Policy Yearbook, the National Council on Teacher Quality offers a closer look into what is shaping up to be a critically important education policy trend. Across the nation states are engaged in create teacher evaluation systems to provide meaningful information about teacher performance, based in significant ways on student achievement, and tying information on teacher effectiveness to decisions of consequence about tenure, compensation, professional development and advancement.

Seminar

The Promise and Pitfalls of Improving the Teaching Profession

The discussion at our daylong conference went beyond the commonly discussed topics of teacher pay and evaluation to ask: Is it feasible to make entry into the profession more competitive? Why is there often a large gap between what aspiring teachers learn in school and the skills they need in the classroom? And why do so few teachers feel they are getting the help they need to improve?

EWA wishes to thank the Carnegie Corporation of New York for its support of this project.

 

Seminar

2010 National Seminar Recap

2010 National Seminar Recap

EWA held its 63rd annual conference May 13-15 in San Francisco, Calif. The conference theme, “Examining the Evidence,” explored research supporting the U.S. Department of Education’s K-12 and higher education reform efforts.

Oscar-winning director and producer Davis Guggenheim addressed the 230 conference attendees about his documentary, “Waiting for Superman,” which looks at education for the poorest of the poor students in the US.

Seminar

Recap: 2009 Reality Check – Where is Education Heading?
See what happened at EWA's 2009 national seminar in Washington, DC.

Some of the best minds in education gave a reality check at the 62nd annual conference of the National Education Writers Association April 30-May 2 in Washington, DC.

Nearly 230 top education journalists and others gathered to hear from an all-star lineup about where education is heading.

Washington Post columnist E.J. Dionne talked about the future of the news industry and education coverage and New York Times Magazine editor and author Paul Tough gave reporters insight into a blossoming education reform in Harlem.

Seminar

Miles to Go: College Completion under the Obama Plan

President Barack Obama has issued an ambitious goal: for the United States to once again lead the world in college attainment, by 2020. Though some programs show promise, college graduation is still out of reach for many Americans, for academic, financial and institutional reasons.

Seminar

Small Schools and High School Reform: Shrinking Size, Diminishing Returns?

School districts frequently look to the small schools model– splitting up large high schools or creating with only a few hundred students– when searching for ways to bolster student achievement and enhance the relationship between students and teachers. If students feel more connected to teachers and other adults at school, the thinking goes, then they will attend classes regularly, show more interest in coursework and do whatever it takes to graduate. Small learning communities have been found to improve school climate and student attitudes.

Seminar

Tips From Math Lessons: a Webinar on Observing a Classroom

Deborah Loewenberg Ball, dean of the University of Michigan School of Education, has been running an experimental summer program where she teaches math to rising fifth graders while observers –both teachers and researchers — watch. The students are from local school districts, are generally from lower-income families, and are struggling with math.

EWA collaborated with the Elementary Math Laboratory staff and Ball to offer a webinar to reporters on Aug. 19, 2008 to discuss the lessons and what reporters can learn about the way math is taught.