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Overview

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A variety of interviews, keynotes and panel discussions with journalists, experts and newsmakers.

A variety of interviews, keynotes and panel discussions with journalists, experts and newsmakers.

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Standardized Testing

The Council of the Great City Schools hosted a forum on the results of a new report on the effectiveness of standardized testing. Michael Casserly made opening remarks on the report, and then panelists that included Education Secretary Arne Duncan analyzed the data in the report.

  • This panel was moderated by Caroline Hendrie, EWA’s executive director.
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Why Motivation and Deeper Learning Matter
New Lens on Learning: The Hidden Value of Motivation, Grit and Engagement

Why Motivation and Deeper Learning Matter

How do you create a good student? How do schools find ways for children to take criticism well, respond to feedback, and learn from mistakes? How does a child’s motivation and sense of self factor into a culture of learning? While schools are finding answers to these questions, there is no shortcut to creating classroom practices — and embracing a “growth mindset” is no panacea. So how can schools adapt the concepts that research shows go a long way toward improving student learning?

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How to Motivate Students — or Not
New Lens on Learning: The Hidden Value of Motivation, Grit and Engagement

How to Motivate Students — or Not

Carol Dweck, a distinguished professor and the scholar most associated with the now-widespread concept of “growth mindset,” talks about new studies on the impact the idea has had in education. How should a student learn from failure? If you tell students that the brain can be trained, will they feel encouraged to put in additional effort? And is feeling motivated even enough — what interventions are necessary when a student tries her best but isn’t comprehending the material?

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Get Schooled: Unlocking the Secrets of the Adolescent Brain
New Lens on Learning: The Hidden Value of Motivation, Grit and Engagement

Get Schooled: Unlocking the Secrets of the Adolescent Brain

Over the past decade research in neuroscience has provided an explosion of new knowledge and insights about the adolescent brain, shedding light on our understanding of teens’ complex neural state. Importantly, the field has focused on the development of neural circuits that underpin social, emotional, and motivational learning and how these systems change at the onset of puberty. These changes create not only vulnerabilities but also opportunities for learning.

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Interventions in the Classroom: What Works, What Doesn’t — A Demonstration
New Lens on Learning: The Hidden Value of Motivation, Grit and Engagement

Interventions in the Classroom: What Works, What Doesn’t — A Demonstration

What does it take to get a kid to care about school? A wave of research is producing quick interventions that motivate students to learn, with hundreds of schools adopting curricular tools designed to boost students’ growth mindsets. How do young learners respond to these efforts to reshape their views about themselves in the context of school? How can educators employ these tricks while teaching core subjects like math or English?

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A Global Lens on Teacher Quality
Beyond the Border: Covering U.S. Education in a Global Context

A Global Lens on Teacher Quality

Leading researchers share findings from a forthcoming book that examines teacher quality practices in high-achieving systems, including Finland, Hong Kong, Shanghai, Singapore, and Canada.

  • Linda Darling-Hammond, Learning Policy Institute, Stanford University
  • Pasi Sahlberg, Harvard Graduate School of Education
  • A. Lin Goodwin, Teachers College, Columbia University
  • Emily Hanford, American RadioWorks (moderator)
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What’s Ahead From OECD?
Beyond the Border: Covering U.S. Education in a Global Context

What’s Ahead From OECD?

The OECD regularly produces new reports and analyses on education issues that can be useful to journalists. Find out about upcoming work, and get your questions answered by the OECD’s new deputy director for education.

  • Montserrat Gomendio, Organization for Economic Cooperation & Development
  • Caroline Hendrie, Education Writers Association (moderator)
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Educational Equity: A City-Level View
Beyond the Border: Covering U.S. Education in a Global Context

Educational Equity: A City-Level View

Learn about efforts to better serve disadvantaged students in Toronto and other major urban systems in the Asia Society’s Global Cities Education Network. This fall, education leaders from participating U.S. cities – Denver, Houston, Lexington, Ky., and Seattle – traveled to Shanghai to visit schools and explore best practices with peers in this network. Other participants include Seoul, Singapore, Hiroshima, and Melbourne.

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International Tests, Global Comparisons
Beyond the Border: Covering U.S. Education in a Global Context

International Tests, Global Comparisons

Welcome Address

  • Caroline Hendrie, Education Writers Association
  • Michael Feuer, The George Washington University

Why do global comparisons in education matter? What do international assessments reveal, and what are their limitations? Have some countries been over-hyped based on their test scores? How do reporters make sense of it all for their readers?

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OECD Test for Schools
Beyond the Border: Covering U.S. Education in a Global Context

OECD Test for Schools

Hundreds of U.S. high schools nationwide are participating in an initiative that allows them to see how their students stack up globally, and to gain information to improve their practices. Why are they doing this? What are they learning?

  • Jon Schnur, America Achieves
  • Tiffany Huitt, School of Science & Engineering (Dallas)
  • Daniel Gohl, Broward County (Florida) Public Schools
  • Liana Heitin, Education Week (moderator)
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What College Affordability Means for the Election
Education & the 2016 White House Race

What College Affordability Means for the Election

College affordability has become a key topic in the 2016 presidential campaign, whether through Democratic candidates’ outlining varying approaches to a debt-free education at public universities or Republican contenders’ suggesting income-sharing arrangements and accreditation reform. A discussion of the nuances and potential of these ideas.

  • Jason Delisle, New America
  • Terry Hartle, American Council on Education
  • Neal McCluskey, Cato Institute
  • Colin Seeberger, Young Invincibles
  • Kimberly Hefling, Politico (moderator)
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Debt-Free College: Adding It Up
Higher Ed 2015

Debt-Free College: Adding It Up

From calls for eliminating community college tuition to plans for allowing all students to leave public colleges debt-free, momentum is building to change the way families pay for college. But what does debt-free really mean, given that not all of the proposals add up the same way? What role will this issue play in the presidential election, and what effect would debt-free options have on private institutions? Is it really economically feasible for the nation to ditch student-loan debt?

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New Developments on the Federal Higher Ed Landscape
Higher Ed 2015

New Developments on the Federal Higher Ed Landscape

A top U.S. Education Department official discusses key issues on the federal postsecondary education agenda in a conversation with a leading reporter who covers higher education policy.

  • Jamienne Studley, Deputy Under Secretary, U.S. Department of Education
  • Kelly Field, The Chronicle of Higher Education (moderator)
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College Ready, Without Remediation?
Higher Ed 2015

College Ready, Without Remediation?

It’s been a year since Florida prohibited public colleges and universities from requiring students to take the tests that determine who needs remedial education courses, meaning that any students could immediately enroll in courses that award college credit. As Colorado, Connecticut, North Carolina, Texas and other states similarly look to change how they approach remedial education, what do the early data on such moves indicate the impact of such changes might be?

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Beyond the Rising Costs of Pensions
2015 EWA National Seminar

Beyond the Rising Costs of Pensions

Pensions are causing serious budget issues across the country, including Illinois. But issues around pensions go beyond the rising costs, and the session will explore those questions, too. How can reporters generate lively stories on this important (but potentially dull) subject?

  • Diane Rado, Chicago Tribune (Speaker/Moderator)
  • Chad Aldeman, Bellwether Education Partners
  • Ralph Martire, Center for Tax and Budget Accountability
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Trends in Charter School Finance
2015 EWA National Seminar

Trends in Charter School Finance

Funding for charter schools is a complex and divisive issue. Do charters get an equitable share of public dollars? How do school facilities fit into the equation, as well as private sources of support for the charter sector? What are recent evolutions in policy concerning charter finance and facilities, and what’s on the horizon?

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Ways to Examine School Discipline
2015 EWA National Seminar

Ways to Examine School Discipline

Schools often say they suspend misbehaving students to restore order and keep others safe. But a recent study questions the link between suspensions and school safety. This session flips the script, as a researcher moderates a panel of reporters who have explored alternatives to the usual diet of suspensions and expulsions.

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New Insights on State Funding for Higher Education
2015 EWA National Seminar

New Insights on State Funding for Higher Education

The Great Recession saw most states drastically cut their spending on public colleges, leading most of those colleges to increase their tuition. As the national economy continues to recover, how has state funding for postsecondary education fared and what does it mean for students and their families?

  • Danielle Douglas-Gabriel, The Washington Post (Moderator)
  • Daniel Hurley, American Association of State Colleges and Universities
  • Laura Perna, University of Pennsylvania
  • Ray Scheppach, University of Virginia
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The Impact of International Students in Higher Education
2015 EWA National Seminar

The Impact of International Students in Higher Education

At one flagship public university, the number of undergraduate students from China jumped from 37 in 2000 to 2,898 this year. As public universities recruited more international students, what impact has the increased diversity had on students’ academic and social lives?

  • Scott Jaschik, Inside Higher Ed (Speaker)
  • Peggy Blumenthal, Institute of International Education
  • Gil Latz, Association of International Education Administrators
  • Nicole Tami, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
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Can FAFSA Be Fixed?
2015 EWA National Seminar

Can FAFSA Be Fixed?

How many questions does the crucial federal financial aid form really need? Proposals to simplify have ranged from trimming the form’s dozens of questions to replacing the form with just few queries on a postcard. This session illuminates how key questions can affect how much aid a student receives.

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Can Innovation Improve Higher Education?
2015 EWA National Seminar

Can Innovation Improve Higher Education?

Higher education faces a major challenge: How to educate more students better as resources and funding at most colleges mostly stay flat. This discussion will examine whether new technology and new approaches such as competency-based education or MOOCs can make college more affordable and effective.

  • Paul Fain, Inside Higher Ed (Moderator)
  • Goldie Blumenstyk, The Chronicle of Higher Education
  • Kevin Carey, New America
  • Ryan Craig, University Ventures
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Teaching Across Cultural Differences: Equity in Instruction and Classrooms
EWA Seminar on Teaching

Teaching Across Cultural Differences: Equity in Instruction and Classrooms

How are cultural and racial biases influencing classroom instruction and student learning? What does this mean for teachers and students, particularly in high-minority, urban school settings? What should education reporters know about cultural bias as it relates to their reporting on students, teachers, and schools?

Speaker:
Associate Professor Dorinda Carter Andrews, Michigan State University

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Taking the Pulse of the Teaching Profession: Andy Baxter
EWA Seminar on Teaching

Taking the Pulse of the Teaching Profession: Andy Baxter

Teacher effectiveness is a front-burner issue in districts nationwide. How are districts, state departments of education, and policymakers responding to the push to improve teacher performance and student outcomes? What does the latest research show on what’s working in public schools?

What does the new “Primary Sources” survey tell us about teachers’ perceptions of the Common Core State Standards? And what are teachers doing to reshape their classroom instruction in response to the new expectations for grade-level learning? 

Speaker:

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Taking the Pulse of the Teaching Profession: Kyle Good
EWA Seminar on Teaching

Taking the Pulse of the Teaching Profession: Kyle Good

Teacher effectiveness is a front-burner issue in districts nationwide. How are districts, state departments of education, and policymakers responding to the push to improve teacher performance and student outcomes? What does the latest research show on what’s working in public schools?

What does the new “Primary Sources” survey tell us about teachers’ perceptions of the Common Core State Standards? And what are teachers doing to reshape their classroom instruction in response to the new expectations for grade-level learning? 

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Common Core: Realities of the Rollout

Our May 19, 2014 special session at the 67th National Seminar looked at Common Core implementation from a variety of angles and perspectives. Below, you can view each presenter’s remarks in full and download his or her slides.

Check out our Topics page more resources on Common Core.

Playlist 1: Politics, Power and Public Debate

Playlist 2: Impact on the Classroom

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National Leadership Summit for Online Learning

The National Leadership Summit for Online Learning, organized by iNACOL, was held in February 2012. This video archive lets you view most of the discussions held there, including “It’s All About Teaching and Learning” and “The Disruptive Innovation.”

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Early Lessons

“Early Lessons,” a project of American Public Media reporter Emily Hanford, takes a look back at the Perry Preschool Project and contrasts it with what happens in many of today’s preschool classrooms.

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Math Class Needs A Makeover

Math Class Needs A Makeover is a TED talk featuring Dan Meyers, who argues that “Today’s math curriculum is teaching students to expect — and excel at — paint-by-numbers classwork, robbing kids of a skill more important than solving problems: formulating them.”

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President Obama: It Gets Better

President Obama: It Gets Better is part of a national campaign started in 2010 to reassure gay and lesbian teens—who face disproportionate bullying and commit suicide at higher than average rates—that they could overcome the abuse and other struggles. (The text of this post was written by the White House deputy director of public engagement.)

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The Promise of Preschool

“The Promise of Preschool” is a documentary by education reporter John Merrow, the president of Learning Matters. The report followed the experiences of four families in New York, Atlanta, Bridgeport, CT and Paris, France, as they considered the range of early-childhood education options available to them. Merrow asked whether it was possible for families to find a consistent level of service in America when even public schools are struggling to maintain programs.

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Changing Education Paradigms

In Changing Education Paradigms, Sir Ken Robinson uses animation to explore “the link between 3 troubling trends: rising drop-out rates, schools’ dwindling stake in the arts, and ADHD.”

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Falloff in Aspiring Teachers: Where and Why?
2015 EWA National Seminar

Falloff in Aspiring Teachers: Where and Why?

A data analysis by Education Week showed a decline in applicants to education schools in key states and Ed Week’s Stephen Sawchuk walks participants through it. ACT’s Steve Kappler unveils a disturbing new report on a dropoff in high school graduates aspiring to teach. Other speakers review the implications of their findings and sources.

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Guardians of the Gigabytes: Who Is Protecting Students’ Data?
2015 EWA National Seminar

Guardians of the Gigabytes: Who Is Protecting Students’ Data?

Children are the future, but they’re also the source of billions of data points, and the battle over that information has just begun. Startups are angling for a piece of the multibillion-dollar education market those kids represent, while government agencies are touting data collection to improve instruction. But who’s keeping student data safe?

Moderator:

  • Benjamin Herold, Education Week

Speakers:

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Too Many Tests?
2015 EWA National Seminar

Too Many Tests?

An ongoing “opt-out” campaign has stirred debate over whether students are over-tested., and what kind of tests are to blame. How much time – and money – do schools spend  on testing? A panel of experts explored the issue during “Too Many Tests?”

Here are the highlights of the discussion moderated by Emily Hanford of American RadioWorks. The panel included Matt Chingos of the Brookings Institution, Scott Marion of the National Center on Assessment, and Bob Schaeffer of FairTest.

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RIP NCLB?: A New Role for Uncle Sam
2015 EWA National Seminar

 RIP NCLB?: A New Role for Uncle Sam

Speakers, including U.S. Rep. Todd Rokita, R-IN, offer reporters the lay of the land and discuss how rewriting the No Child Left Behind Act may affect their school districts and states. Some speakers say NCLB is already dead, but they’re still not certain what will take its place, other than policies handed down through the U.S. Department of Education’s waivers from NCLB provisions.

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Special Education and Charter Schools
Charters & Choice Seminar

Special Education and Charter Schools

A worrisome dimension of charter schooling is the oftentimes disproportionately low share of students with disabilities served by this sector of public education. Experts explore what explains the situation, what’s being done about it, and highlight examples where intensive work is underway to ensure that charters effectively serve the needs of all children, including those with disabilities.

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School Choice Policy and Politics: What’s Ahead?
Charters & Choice Seminar

School Choice Policy and Politics: What’s Ahead?

Republican gains in the 2014 elections set the stage for a renewed push to expand school choice at the state and federal levels, including charter schools, vouchers, and tuition tax credits. What legislation is emerging and what stands the greatest likelihood of becoming law? To what extent will policymakers respond to concerns about quality and accountability in schools of choice?

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Private Schools and Public Funding
Charters & Choice Seminar

Private Schools and Public Funding

Public policy efforts to expand private school choice continue to grow, and may well get a boost from GOP gains in the midterm elections last fall. From vouchers to tuition tax credits and education savings accounts, what’s happening, what’s on the horizon, and why? How do these initiatives vary across states and cities? What role does and should testing and accountability play in publicly subsidized choice initiatives? Where do key legal challenges stand?

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Lessons From New Orleans
Charters & Choice Seminar

Lessons From New Orleans

This year marks the tenth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, the storm that sparked an unprecedented experiment in public education in New Orleans. Nearly all public schools in the city are now charters. A decade in, what have we learned about the New Orleans experience and what lessons does it offer to other states and communities that are looking to ramp up the role of charters and choice in public education?

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Eye on Denver
Charters & Choice Seminar

Eye on Denver

This city has developed a robust and diverse set of public school options for students, including several dozen charter schools as well as the district’s own “innovation” schools. Denver is also seen as a place, unlike many, where the district and the charter sectors play well together. What does school choice look like in Denver? How meaningful are the options for students? Is the choice landscape promoting equity?

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Making Sense of the Evolving Assessment Landscape
Covering Standards and Testing (Denver Seminar)

Making Sense of the Evolving Assessment Landscape

This school year marks the first time that most states will test students on the Common Core. At the same time, many states have backed away from their plans to use shared assessments and are choosing their own tests. Where do the states stand? How different will their new exams be from prior tests? And what are key questions reporters should keep in mind as they cover the first round of test results?

EWA Radio

Covering the Higher-Ed Beat and Stories to Watch in 2015
EWA Radio, Episode 17, Part 1

A reporter who covers Ohio State University and a national higher-ed reporter discuss how their vantage points influence coverage. Does having a background in covering K-12 improve higher-ed reporting? Do national reporters benefit from living near flagship state universities? The guests also make predictions for stories to watch in 2015. 

Webinar

EWA Hosts Sneak Preview of National Report on Early Childhood Indicators
Journalist Only Webinar

EWA Hosts Sneak Preview of National Report on Early Childhood Indicators

Journalists will get an early opportunity this week to review Education Week’s newest Quality Counts report, which includes a special focus on early childhood education indicators. The report will evaluate states on their efforts to expand early childhood education and examine how new academic demands and accountability pressures are altering the learning environment for young children. Join EWA for a Jan. 7 webinar to learn more.

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College Sports for Education Reporters
2014 Higher Ed Semiar

College Sports for Education Reporters

Star athletes accused of sexual assault. Student athletes forming their own labor unions and winning judgments that say they are eligible to profit from their popularity. Academic fraud. While stories such as these typically have been the turf of sports reporters, it’s becoming more important for education reporters to stay ahead of these issues. Two experts on the interplay between athletics and academics offer their insights.

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Campus Sexual Assaults: Understanding the Angles
2014 Higher Ed Seminar

Campus Sexual Assaults: Understanding the Angles

Since 2011, when the U.S. Department of Education made clear that schools’ failure to address incidents of sexual assault adequately could trigger Title IX penalties, this problem—which has long been a taboo topic in higher education—has become the flashpoint issue on campuses across the nation. Each new incident showcases conflicting perspectives, ranging from those of advocates who say colleges are failing victims to men who think the new policy guidelines are stacked against them. Some question whether institutions should even be involved or are these matters better left to police?

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Attitude Adjustment: The Impact of Mentoring and Psychology
2014 Higher Ed Semiar

Attitude Adjustment: The Impact of Mentoring and Psychology

Academics are just part of the story for many students entering college – a whole new culture of learning awaits them. But if they are first-generation college students, those cultural challenges can derail a promising postsecondary career. New research is exploring the effects mentoring programs and brief psychological interventions can have on low-income, minority and first-generation students. What can colleges do to promote resiliency and support student well-being for all students?  Are such efforts merely too much “coddling” of students by campuses? 

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The Data Deluge: Can Student Information Improve Completion?
2014 Higher Ed Semiar

The Data Deluge: Can Student Information Improve Completion?

Is keeping students on track to earn a degree as simple as just sending them text messages reminding them to register for classes and renew financial aid? That’s one element of “predictive analytics,” which is the use of detailed student data—from demographic background to grades on recent homework assignments—to guide students toward academic success. With as many as 150 colleges and universities already using some form of analytics, what do journalists need to know about the pros and cons of how these systems work?

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(Community) College Readiness
2014 Higher Ed Seminar

(Community) College Readiness

While high schools across the nation have increasingly turned their attention toward making their graduates “college and career ready,” many community colleges are pondering the best way to educate those adults who enroll underprepared. One approach that appears to be gaining momentum—in Connecticut, Florida and Texas, for example— is to eliminate developmental or remedial education offerings altogether, arguing that these costly courses deter students from earning degrees.

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What Should the College Student Experience Look Like in the 21st Century?
2014 Higher Ed Semiar

What Should the College Student Experience Look Like in the 21st Century?

Can the United States continue to sustain financially the notion of residential college experience?  What are parents and students expecting when they choose a college?  How has the rise of the “value consumer” altered the landscape of the 21st Century college campus?  How will the changing demographics (e.g., increased calls for accountability in higher education, MOOCs, and other models for delivering education) affect the traditional residential experience? 

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Making Sense of the Evolving Assessment Landscape
Covering Standards and Testing (DC Seminar)

Making Sense of the Evolving Assessment Landscape

This school year marks the first time that most states will test students on the Common Core. At the same time, many states have backed away from their plans to use shared assessments and are choosing their own tests. Where do the states stand? How different will their new exams be from prior tests? And what are key questions reporters should keep in mind as they cover the first round of test results?

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Surveys: What Educators and the Public Are Saying About Common Core
Covering Standards and Testing (DC Seminar)

Surveys: What Educators and the Public Are Saying About Common Core

Lots of recent surveys have sought to gauge support by educators and the public for the standards and testing. Learn what the sometimes conflicting results reveal. And find out where district-level implementation of the Common Core stands, based on extensive national polling of school district officials.

  • Maria Ferguson, Center on Education Policy
  • Diane Stark Rentner, Center on Education Policy
  • Erik Robelen, Education Writers Association (moderator)
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Taking Political Stock of the Common Core
Covering Standards and Testing (DC Seminar)

Taking Political Stock of the Common Core

It’s no secret that the standards and forthcoming tests have drawn increasingly strong criticism over the past year. Why has the Common Core become so controversial? What will the midterm election results mean for implementation and state support? And what happens in states that call for a review or even rescind the standards? Will much really change?

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Ratings and Rankings: What They Really Mean for Colleges and Universities
2014 Higher Ed Semiar

Ratings and Rankings: What They Really Mean for Colleges and Universities

As the higher ed community eagerly awaits the details of President Obama’s plan to rate colleges and universities and perhaps tie their access to federal funding to their performance, third-party rankings and ratings of colleges and universities continue to proliferate. What effects do these reports have on the priorities of these institutions and how should journalists interpret each new list of “bests”?

EWA Radio

Lessons From the Rolling Stone Debacle
EWA Radio, Episode 16

Earlier this month, Rolling Stone magazine published a story about an alleged gang rape at the University of Virginia, which resulted in outrage, shock, and a temporary suspension of all fraternities and sororities at the vaunted institution of higher education. But now, serious questions have been raised about freelance writer Sabrina Rubin Erdely’s reporting, as well as Rolling Stone’s decision to publish the story without stronger verification.

EWA Radio

The Midterms: New Congress, Same Education Strife?
EWA Radio, Episode 14

Politico’s Allie Grasgreen and Alyson Klein of Education Week join EWA Radio hosts Emily Richmond and Mikhail Zinshteyn to discuss the changing education priorities of Congress now that the GOP controls both houses. The reporters share their election surprises and provide tips for reporters on what to expect in federal legislation through 2016.

EWA Radio

Principal Turnover: What’s Happening in Denver?
EWA Radio, Episode 13

Why are so many principals in Denver leaving their jobs? And what is the local school district doing to try and stem the churn? EWA Radio speaks with Katharine Schimel of Chalkbeat Colorado about her story looking into the high rate of principal turnover, and what it means for student learning and campus climate in the Mile High City.

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Teacher College Accountability: Changes on Horizon
EWA Seminar on Teaching

Teacher College Accountability: Changes on Horizon

With an eye to toughening admission standards and curricula, a massive overhaul of the credentialing standards for the nation’s teacher preparation programs is underway. But given that participation is voluntary, are ongoing changes enough? What more needs to be done to improve such programs? And how should policymakers, taxpayers and potential students judge the quality of teacher preparation programs?

Panelists:

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Teacher Induction and Mentoring: Liam Goldrick, New Teacher Center
EWA Seminar on Teaching

Teacher Induction and Mentoring: Liam Goldrick, New Teacher Center

For new teachers, the first few years on the job can present a steep learning curve. And the students who need the most experienced teachers often don’t get them. How are schools, districts and states ramping up the support provided to new teachers? What are the hallmarks of a high-quality induction program? And what does the research show on the effects of coaching and mentoring?

Panelist:

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Teacher Induction and Mentoring: Magdalene Lampert, Boston Residency Project
EWA Seminar on Teaching

Teacher Induction and Mentoring: Magdalene Lampert, Boston Residency Project

For new teachers, the first few years on the job can present a steep learning curve. And the students who need the most experienced teachers often don’t get them. How are schools, districts and states ramping up the support provided to new teachers? What are the hallmarks of a high-quality induction program? And what does the research show on the effects of coaching and mentoring?

Panelist:

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Haslam Discusses Push to Foster College-Going Culture in Tenn.

Haslam Discusses Push to Foster College-Going Culture in Tenn.

Gov. Bill Haslam talks with education reporters about the hoped-for payoffs—and political trade-offs—of his initiative to boost the number of Tennesseans with education past high school, including through “last-dollar scholarships” that make two years of community college tuition-free. His remarks came during a keynote address on May 19, 2014, at the Education Writers Association’s 2014 National Seminar at Vanderbilt University in Nashville.

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Tenn. Gov. Haslam on What’s at Stake With Common Core

Tenn. Gov. Haslam on What’s at Stake With Common Core

Gov. Bill Haslam discusses why his home state should stay the course as supporters of common standards and tests work to fend off attacks from both the right and left on the political spectrum. His remarks came in a keynote address on May 19, 2014, at the Education Writers Association’s 2014 National Seminar at Vanderbilt University in Nashville.

EWA Radio

Illinois Lawmakers Use Influence on Teacher Licensing
EWA Radio, Episode 10

Chicago Tribune investigation turns up instances of lawmakers intervening in teacher licensing decisions on behalf of their friends and donors. Tribune education reporter Diane Rado speaks with EWA’s Emily Richmond and Mikhail Zinshteyn about her ongoing coverage of licensing issues, and what it means for local students and schools.

EWA Radio

To Avoid Suspension, Students Talk It Out
EWA Radio, Episode 9

In Texas, a state known for its zero-tolerance approach to school discipline, 80 percent of its prisoners are high school dropouts. And as more research finds a link between suspensions and quitting school early, the evidence is mounting that keeping kids from learning for behavioral reasons hurts their academic outcomes. Against this backdrop is White Middle School in central Texas.

EWA Radio

Is Kochs’ High School Finance Class Pushing Conservative Agenda?
EWA Radio, Episode 8

This week, Emily and Mikhail talk to Joy Resmovits of The Huffington Post, who discusses her story (written with colleague Christina Wilkie) about the Charles G. Koch Foundation’s creation of Youth Entrepreneurs: a public high school finance course being used in schools in the midwest and south, which was designed to introduce students to free market theory and economics with a distinctly conservative point of view. 

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Prepping Our Kids for College: What Will the Next Decade Teach Us?

Prepping Our Kids for College: What Will the Next Decade Teach Us?

David Coleman accepted the challenge to rethink our children’s core curriculum across the nation. Now the architect of the Common Core is tackling the SAT and the testing that measures our youth for higher education. What’s up?

Speakers: Jane Stoddard Williams, David Coleman

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The Authorizer Effect

The Authorizer Effect

Whether it’s a curriculum that makes religion the fourth “R,” a principal who steers lucrative contracts to family members, or test scores that remain stuck in the cellar, charter schools often make the news for all the wrong reasons. Analysts have long seen a connection between problem charters and the process for deciding who gets a charter to operate in the first place. But how much difference does the quality of charter authorizing actually make? Have efforts to strengthen charter authorizing been effective, and if so, where?

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Asking the Core Questions

Asking the Core Questions

Rick Hess of the American Enterprise Institute talks about some of the important questions to ask about Common Core assessments.

Recorded Monday, May 19 at Common Core: Realities of the Rollout, a special session held during EWA’s 67th National Seminar at Vanderbilt University.

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Common Core: Test for Learning

Common Core: Test for Learning

Jacqueline King of the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium talks about how the assessment experience will change under Common Core.

Recorded Monday, May 19 at Common Core: Realities of the Rollout, a special session held during EWA’s 67th National Seminar at Vanderbilt University.

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Alabama’s ‘Uncommon’ Core

Alabama’s ‘Uncommon’ Core

Tommy Bice, Alabama’s state schools superintendent, talks about developing assessments outside of the PARCC and Smarter Balanced consortia.

Recorded Monday, May 19 at Common Core: Realities of the Rollout, a special session held during EWA’s 67th National Seminar at Vanderbilt University.

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The End of Test Prep

The End of Test Prep

Laura Slover of the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers talks about the development of PARCC’s Common Core-aligned math and reading tests.

Recorded Monday, May 19 at Common Core: Realities of the Rollout, a special session held during EWA’s 67th National Seminar at Vanderbilt University.

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Common Core: The Plane Being Built in the Air

Common Core: The Plane Being Built in the Air

Carol Burris, the principal of New York’s South Side High School, talks about how Common Core-aligned assessments in New York frustrated students and inflated achievement gaps.

Recorded Monday, May 19 at Common Core: Realities of the Rollout, a special session held during EWA’s 67th National Seminar at Vanderbilt University.

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Achieving a New State: A Look at State Turnaround Districts

Achieving a New State: A Look at State Turnaround Districts

More places are experimenting with state-run initiatives to address chronically low-performing public schools. Converting such schools to charters is among the strategies these state-led districts employ. We showcase leading examples of the trend, including the Achievement School District in Tennessee. Observers also comment on the Louisiana Recovery School District and the Michigan Education Achievement Authority. How well are their strategies working?

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Common Core, Uncommon Politics

Common Core, Uncommon Politics

Patrick McGuinn of Drew University talks about the sometimes-unexpected world of Common Core polling.

Recorded Monday, May 19 at Common Core: Realities of the Rollout, a special session held during EWA’s 67th National Seminar at Vanderbilt University.

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Engaging the Core

Engaging the Core

Jonathan Supovitz, co-director of CPRE, talks about writing policy that leads to greater engagement with Common Core.

Recorded Monday, May 19 at Common Core: Realities of the Rollout, a special session held during EWA’s 67th National Seminar at Vanderbilt University. 

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Climate Change and Evolution: Teaching in the Face of Controversy

Climate Change and Evolution: Teaching in the Face of Controversy

What are the challenges for teachers in handling topics that scientists may see as settled questions, but that still stir contention in society at large? University of Southern California professor Gale Sinatra talks about the challenges educators, students and the community face when dealing with controversial science topics such as evolution and climate change.

Recorded Feb. 21, 2014 at EWA’s seminar for reporters, “STEM and Beyond: Strengthening the Skills of Students and Journalists.”

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STEM Worker Shortage: Does It Exist and Is Education To Blame?

STEM Worker Shortage: Does It Exist and Is Education To Blame?

The National Science Board’s biennial book, “Science and Engineering Indicators,” consistently finds that the U.S. produces many more STEM graduates than the workforce can absorb. Meanwhile, employers say managers are struggling to find qualified workers in STEM fields. What explains these apparently contradictory trends?

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Zero to Five: The Crucial Years

Zero to Five: The Crucial Years

Dana Suskind of Thirty Million Words discusses the childhood language gap and approaches to closing it; Natasha Cabrera of the University of Maryland talks about the assets minority children bring to preschool; and Tim Bartik of the Upjohn Institute for Employment Research talks about the economics of early childhood education.

Recorded Feb. 3, 2014 at Tulane University during EWA’s seminar for reporters, “Building a Child’s Mind: Inside Early Childhood Education.”

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How I Did the Story: Tips For Reporters Writing About Early Ed

How I Did the Story: Tips For Reporters Writing About Early Ed

Veteran education reporter Sarah Carr offers advice and strategies for journalists on the challenges of covering early childhood.

Recorded Feb. 3, 2014 at Tulane University during EWA’s conference for reporters, “Building a Child’s Mind: Inside Early Childhood Education.”

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How I Did the Story: The Hell of American Day Care

How I Did the Story: The Hell of American Day Care

In 2013, Jonathan Cohn wrote about the frightening inadequacies of the American child care system for the New Republic. We asked him to join us at our early childhood education conference to talk about how he reported “The Hell of American Daycare.” 

Recorded Feb. 3, 2014 at Tulane University during EWA’s conference for reporters, “Building a Child’s Mind: Inside Early Childhood Education.”

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Is Federal Early Childhood Policy Headed in the Right Direction?

Is Federal Early Childhood Policy Headed in the Right Direction?

What has the Obama administration achieved in the area of early childhood education? What are the pros, cons and prospects for its current agenda? And how is that agenda playing out in the broader policy landscape, federal and otherwise? A discussion between Libby Doggett, U.S. Department of Education, and Russ Whitehurst of the Brookings Institution, moderated by NPR’s Claudio Sanchez.

Recorded Feb. 3, 2014 at Tulane University during EWA’s conference for reporters, “Building a Child’s Mind: Inside Early Childhood Education.”

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Preparing Future Workers: High School Redesign and Career/Technical Education

Preparing Future Workers: High School Redesign and Career/Technical Education

Big changes are afoot in how schools prepare students for the knowledge economy. Career and technical education is no longer and byword for tracking, and districts are exploring ways to make science and technology learning hands-on. Our panelists discuss the trends and challenges in preparing students for a meaningful place in the highly skilled workforce.

Speakers: Jim Stone III, National Research Center for Career and Technical Education, University of Louisville; Steve Rockenbach, Ernest S. McBride High School; Abraham Orozco, Heart of Los Angeles.

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Ten Takeaways on Where States Stand on Common Core

Ten Takeaways on Where States Stand on Common Core

An intensive survey of state officials by the Center on Education Policy offers insight into the challenges facing states as they implement Common Core State Standards.
Topics covered include how states are working with higher education institutions, gearing up for assessments, and preparing teachers and principals for the transition.

Speakers: Diane Stark Rentner, Center for Education Policy; Maria Voles Ferguson, Center on Education Policy; Caroline Hendrie, Education Writers Association (moderator)

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Opportunities and Risks: Practical Issues with the Common Core Rollout

Opportunities and Risks: Practical Issues with the Common Core Rollout

The political debate about Common Core is ongoing, but other issues are coming to the fore. What are the checks and balances amid the frenzy of products purportedly aligned to the standards? How are states and districts engaging parents? Will colleges accept that high school graduates educated to the standards are college-ready? Our panelists address these and other issues.

EWA Radio

Opportunities and Risks: Practical Issues with the Common Core Rollout

The political debate about Common Core is ongoing, but other issues are coming to the fore. What are the checks and balances amid the frenzy of products purportedly aligned to the standards? How are states and districts engaging parents? Are colleges going to accept that high school graduates educated to the standards are college-ready? Panelists address these and other issues. Speakers: Gov.

EWA Radio

Assessing Common Core: What’s at Stake?

What do Smarter Balanced and PARCC officials see for the future? Speakers: Jacqueline King of Smarter Balanced and Laura Slover of the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers. Moderated by Lisa Fleisher, Wall Street Journal. Recorded Nov. 4, 2013 at EWA’s reporting seminar, Common Core at the Crossroads: What Comes Next?

EWA Radio

Putting Common Core in Context: Why it Matters

A key impetus for the Common Core State Standards has been American students’ standing in the world. Speakers: Marc Tucker of the National Center on Education and Economy and author Amanda Ripley, interviewed by Michael Chandler of the Washington Post. Recorded Nov. 4, 2013 at EWA’s reporting seminar, Common Core at the Crossroads: What Comes Next?

EWA Radio

Confessions of a Bad Teacher

John Owens, who worked in the media world, decided he wanted to contribute to society by becoming a teacher. He lasted only a few months and wrote an article called “Confessions of a Bad Teacher.” The column hit a nerve and the article became a book. Owens will describe his experiences as a teacher with evaluations, classroom observations and a principal who gamed the system. Author John Owens interviewed by Greg Toppo of USA Today. Recorded Oct. 11, 2013 at More Than Scores: Assessing the Future of Teacher Evaluations.

EWA Radio

The Chicago Perspective: A New Model for Teacher Evaluations in the Windy City

How are teacher evaluations impacting teaching and learning in the nation’s fifth-largest school district? How might Chicago’s experience be a teachable moment for educators and policymakers in other communities? Panelists: Linda Lenz, Catalyst Chicago (moderator); Carol Caref, Chicago Teachers Union; Paulette Poncelet, Chicago Public Schools; Sue Sporte, University of Chicago Consortium on Chicago School Research. Recorded Oct. 11, 2013 at More Than Scores: Assessing the Future of Teacher Evaluations.

EWA Radio

The Early Education Connection: Measuring the Youngest Learners

Robert Pianta describes his extensive research into what makes a good early childhood education teacher and how the University of Virginia developed an instrument to measure early childhood teachers. Laura Bornfreund discusses the different approaches being used by districts to measure student growth for the purpose of evaluating early childhood education (Pre-K-grade 3) teachers as well as the potential hurdles to widespread, reliable implementation. Panelists: Cornelia Grumman (moderator); Laura Bornfreund, New America Foundation; Bob Pianta, University of Virginia. Recorded Oct.

EWA Radio

Teacher Evaluations and Equity: A National Overview

How are states responding to the push for greater accountability and transparency in how teacher job performance is measured? How are union leaders helping members adjust to the new expectations? Can evaluations be used as a lever to more equitably distribute teacher talent, and ensure the neediest students get the most effective instruction? Speakers include Stephanie Banchero, Wall St. Journal (moderator); Sandi Jacobs, National Council on Teacher Quality; Sarah Lenhoff, director of policy and research, Education Trust – Midwest; and Dennis Van Roekel, National Education Association.

EWA Radio

More than Scores: Framing Remarks from Tim Knowles

To open EWA’s 2013 workshop on teacher evaluations, Tim Knowles of the University of Chicago’s Urban Education Institute talks about how the changing landscape of teacher evaluations is influencing broader conversations about school improvement and student achievement. Recorded Oct. 10, 2013 at EWA’s education reporting workshop More Than Scores: Assessing the Future of Teacher Evaluations.

EWA Radio

Understanding and Using Value-Added Data

What questions should reporters be asking when using evaluation-related data in stories? What is incumbent for reporters to learn about the use of student growth, and what is incumbent for officials to provide when they report the numbers? How can reporters convey the nuance without dulling their prose? Sabrina Laine, AIR, interviewed by Stephen Sawchuk, Education Week Recorded Oct. 10, 2013 at EWA’s education reporting workshop More Than Scores: Assessing the Future of Teacher Evaluations.

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Tracking Veterans’ Success in Higher Ed

Tracking Veterans’ Success in Higher Ed

About 250 community colleges and four-year institutions recently have pledged to track veterans’ outcomes and support them on campus through a new program of the U.S. Department of Education. How much do we know about the recent success rates of veterans at American colleges and what services exist to support them?

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Making the Most of Online Education

Making the Most of Online Education

Recorded at EWA’s 2013 Higher Ed seminar, “Guess Who’s Coming to Campus: What Demographic Changes Mean for Colleges and Reporters.”

Research has found that the types of students most likely to opt for online courses for reasons of access, including low-income, black and Latino students, are the same students who are least likely to succeed in those courses. What practices and programs are succeeding at beating this trend?

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Obama’s Proposal: Will Performance Ratings Hurt Student Access?

Obama’s Proposal: Will Performance Ratings Hurt Student Access?

Last month, President Obama unveiled an ambitious proposal to reform higher education by tying a college’s access to federal financial aid for students to a new set of ratings the government would produce. Would universities, forced to focus more on student outcomes, be less inclined to enroll students from backgrounds that traditionally have been underserved by higher education?

EWA Radio

Obama’s Proposal: Will Performance Ratings Hurt Student Access?

Last month, President Obama unveiled an ambitious proposal to reform higher education by tying a college’s access to federal financial aid for students to a new set of ratings the government would produce. Would universities, forced to focus more on student outcomes, be less inclined to enroll students from backgrounds that traditionally have been underserved by higher education?

EWA Radio

Making the Most of Online Education

Research has found that the types of students most likely to opt for online courses for reasons of access, including low-income, black and Latino students, are the same students who are least likely to succeed in those courses. What practices and programs are succeeding at beating this trend? Speakers: Thomas Bailey, Director, Community College Research Center; Jay Bhatt, President and CEO, BlackBoard Inc; Bror Saxberg, Chief Learning Officer, Kaplan Inc.; Steve Kolowich, Staff Reporter, The Chronicle of Higher Education (moderator) Recorded Saturday, Sept.

EWA Radio

Getting In: The Debate Continues

For many students, the first hurdle in their pursuit of a degree is the admissions process. As the debates swirl about whether colleges should offer special considerations—whether race-based or class-based—in choosing which students to accept, what is known about how much access students of all backgrounds have to higher education?

EWA Radio

The Changing Face of College

The next few years could be a turning point for higher education, as the traditional student population starts to shift dramatically. How long will the total number of new high school graduates continue to decline? Of that pool of students, what percentages will be black and Latino or from low-income backgrounds? What will these changes herald for postsecondary education?

EWA Radio

Tracking Veterans’ Success

About 250 community colleges and four-year institutions recently have pledged to track veterans’ outcomes and support them on campus through a new program of the U.S. Department of Education. How much do we know about the recent success rates of veterans at American colleges and what services exist to support them? Speakers: Peter Buryk, Senior Project Associate, Rand Corporation; Marc V. Cole, Senior Advisor for Veterans and Military Families, U.S. Department of Education; Ashley Parker-Roman, U.S.

EWA Radio

Black and Latino Males: Getting To and Through College

Shaun Harper, director of the Center for Study of Race and Equity in Education at the University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Education, previews new research on how New York City addressed the challenge of guiding more of its black and Latino male students to postsecondary success. Recorded Saturday, Sept. 28 at EWA’s 2013 Higher Ed Seminar, Guess Who’s Coming to Campus: What Demographic Changes Mean for Colleges and Reporters.

Multimedia

The Changing Face of College

The Changing Face of College

The next few years could be a turning point for higher education, as the traditional student population starts to shift dramatically. How long will the total number of new high school graduates continue to decline? Of that pool of students, what percentages will be black and Latino or from low-income backgrounds? What will these changes herald for postsecondary education?

EWA Radio

The Struggle to Fill Seats

With the total numbers of new high school graduates dropping while tuition prices rise, many private colleges and universities have seen their enrollment numbers decline. Because most of these schools depend on tuition revenue in order to operate, these shortfalls pose serious threats to their existence. Which schools are in jeopardy and why? Speakers: Jarrett L. Carter, Founder and Editor, HBCUDigest.com; William S. Reed, Chair, Davis Educational Foundation; Jon Marcus, Contributing Editor, The Hechinger Report (moderator) Recorded Friday, Sept.

EWA Radio

Elizabeth Warren on Student Debt and College Costs

Sen. Warren (D-Mass.) discusses rising college costs and student debt reform at EWA’s 2013 Higher Ed seminar Sept. 28, 2013. Please note: Due to a faulty microphone, the sound quality during the first part of the Q&A is shaky. Because the audio is not completely obscured, the event is presented here in its entirety. The audio for Sen. Warren’s speech and the second half of the Q&A is normal.

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Hangout with Hedy Chang

Hangout with Hedy Chang

September is Attendance Awareness Month, and to kick it off EWA Public Editor Emily Richmond chatted with Hedy Chang, director of the national initiative AttendanceWorks. They discussed a new report from the University of Chicago Consortium on Chicago School Research examining how absenteeism impacts learning outcomes for preschoolers, as well as some findings on the reasons for their absences.

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EWA Hangout with Bill Bushaw

EWA Hangout with Bill Bushaw

On Aug. 21, PDK International and Gallup released the 45th annual edition of the Poll of the Public’s Attitudes Toward the Public Schools, the nation’s longest-running poll on education issues. In a live video chat, Bill Bushaw, executive director of PDK, spoke with EWA Public Editor Emily Richmond about some of the surprising findings, including the public’s awareness of the Common Core State Standards, attitudes toward high-stakes testing, and parental concerns about school safety.