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Latest Education News

A collection of the most recent education journalism, curated by EWA staff. 

A collection of the most recent education journalism, curated by EWA staff. 

Latest News

Have We Lost Sight of the Promise of Public Schools?

In the days leading up to and after Betsy DeVos’s confirmation as secretary of education, a hashtag spread across Twitter: #publicschoolproud. Parents and teachers tweeted photos of their kids studying, performing, eating lunch together. People of all races tweeted about how public schools changed them, saved them, helped them succeed.

Latest News

‘Alternative’ Education: Using Charter Schools to Hide Dropouts and Game the System

Alternative schools have long served as placements for students who violated disciplinary codes. But since the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 refashioned the yardstick for judging schools, alternative education has taken on another role: A silent release valve for high schools like Olympia that are straining under the pressure of accountability reform.

Latest News

For-Profit Schools, an Obama Target, See New Day Under Trump

Since Election Day, for-profit college companies have been on a hot streak. DeVry Education Group’s stock has leapt more than 40 percent. Strayer’s jumped 35 percent and Grand Canyon Education’s more than 28 percent.

You do not need an M.B.A. to figure out why. Top officials in Washington who spearheaded a relentless crackdown on the multibillion-dollar industry have been replaced by others who have profited from it.

Latest News

The Mile High Promise, And Risk, Of School Choice

During Betsy DeVos’ bitter confirmation hearing last month for education secretary, U.S. Sen. Michael Bennet pointed to Denver as a potential national model of a big city school district that’s found an innovative, balanced approach to school choice.

“Without exception,” the Colorado Democrat told DeVos, “we demanded quality and implemented strong accountability” for the mix of traditional, charter, innovation and magnet schools in the 92,000-student district.

Latest News

The Invisible Hazard Afflicting Thousands of Schools

In traffic-clogged Southern California, plenty of people grasp the dangers of kids attending class close to busy roads and their largely invisible clouds of air pollution. But that’s not nearly so well understood in the rest of the country — even though the problem stretches from coast to coast.

Latest News

The Invisible Hazard Afflicting Thousands of Schools

In traffic-clogged Southern California, plenty of people grasp the dangers of kids attending class close to busy roads and their largely invisible clouds of air pollution. But that’s not nearly so well understood in the rest of the country — even though the problem stretches from coast to coast.

Latest News

The Invisible Hazard Afflicting Thousands of Schools

In traffic-clogged Southern California, plenty of people grasp the dangers of kids attending class close to busy roads and their largely invisible clouds of air pollution. But that’s not nearly so well understood in the rest of the country — even though the problem stretches from coast to coast.

Latest News

DeVos Says Community Colleges Key to Workforce Development

Community colleges will play an important role in advancing President Donald Trump’s workforce agenda, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos said at a meeting of community college leaders Thursday. It was DeVos’ first appearance at a conference event in her new role.

Speaking from prepared remarks at the National Legislative Summit of the Association of Community College Trustees (ACCT), DeVos characterized the nation’s community colleges as “nimble, inclusive and entrepreneurial.”

Latest News

Yale University Changes Calhoun College Name Post-Trump

Over the weekend, Yale President Peter Salovey announced that the university will give Calhoun College, dedicated to the white supremacist and fervent slavery supporter John Calhoun, a new name: Hopper College, after the renowned computer scientist Grace Murray Hopper.

Member Stories

February 9-16
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

For the San Antonio Express-News, Alia Malik speaks with families who still feel threatened by the shifting enforcement of immigration laws even after the San Antonio Independent School District Board of Trustees approved a resolution to protect their identities.


 

Latest News

State Superintendent Candidate: Challenger Offered Six Figure Job to Drop Out of Race

A candidate for state superintendent offered an opponent a taxpayer-funded $150,000 job in order to drop out of the race and sought the same for himself if he dropped out, his challenger said Wednesday.

Candidate John Humphries said in an interview with the Wisconsin State Journal that during discussions between him and opponent Lowell Holtz, Holtz proposed in writing that either he or Humphries should drop out in exchange for the guaranteed three-year job with the Department of Public Instruction should one of them defeat incumbent Tony Evers in the general election. 

Latest News

Gender Pay Gap Persists for Higher Education Administrators

Higher education administration is still a man’s world if you’re measuring pay and position title.

A gender pay gap at the top levels of higher education leadership has persisted over the last 15 years, according to new research released Tuesday by the College and University Professional Association for Human Resources, known as CUPA-HR. A gulf between the number of men and women in the most prestigious, highest-paying jobs has not closed significantly, either.

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Influential Conservative Group: Trump, Devos Should Dismantle Education Department and Bring God Into Classrooms

A policy manifesto from an influential conservative group with ties to the Trump administration, including Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, urges dismantling the Education Department and bringing God into American classrooms.

The five-page document produced by the Council for National Policy calls for a “restoration of education in America” that would minimize the federal role, promote religious schools and homeschooling and enshrine “historic Judeo-Christian principles” as a basis for instruction.

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Texas School Districts Skimping on Sex Education, Report Says

More than 83 percent of Texas school districts taught abstinence-only or no sex education at all in the 2015-16 school year, according to a new report from the Texas Freedom Network.

Despite the high share, that percentage is down from around a decade ago, when the organization first examined the issue and found that 96 percent of school districts taught abstinence-only or no sex education.

Latest News

Much-Criticized Teacher Literacy Test Could Be On the Chopping Block Next Month

New York is poised to make it significantly easier to become a teacher — though their plans are on ice for a month.

The state’s education policymakers were set to vote on a major change to teacher certification requirements on Monday that would have walked back a controversial effort to make the teaching profession more selective. Winter weather won out, canceling the meeting.

The votes may happen in March but education department officials said it’s too early to have a finalized agenda. Here’s what we know.

Latest News

Lawmakers Want Federal Special Education Site Restored

Two congressional lawmakers are asking the Trump administration to restore a missing U.S. government website that helps families navigate a complex federal law on students with disabilities. They also want U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos’ assurance that the site won’t be stripped down during her tenure.

Latest News

CPS Paying for Re-Enrolled Dropouts, Even if They Cut Class

The cash-strapped Chicago school system is overpaying by as much as $10 million for its new fleet of for-profit alternative schools for dropouts, according to a WBEZ analysis of a Chicago Public Schools audit. The school system pays these half-day schools based on enrollment, but a recent audit found that just 44 percent of their 3,000 enrolled students are coming to class.

Latest News

Where School Choice Isn’t an Option, Rural Public Schools Worry They’ll Be Left Behind

Washington has long designed education policy to deal with urban and suburban challenges, often overlooking the unique problems that face rural schools. With a new administration in the White House that prefers “school-choice” approaches — favoring charter schools and private-school vouchers so parents can opt out of public schools and bring taxpayer dollars with them — the nation’s rural schools are left to wonder about their fate.

Latest News

Governors, State Lawmakers Roll Out School Choice Proposals

U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos—now the nation’s most visible school choice advocate—takes the helm at a time when Republicans control the governor’s house or the state legislature in 44 states and have full control of the executive and legislative branches in 25 states.

Latest News

Education Department Flunks Spelling

In quoting civil rights activist W.E.B. Du Bois, the Department of Education on Sunday sent out a tweet misspelling his name. And then it sent out an apology that misspelled the word “apologies.”

Latest News

Key House Lawmaker Discusses What’s Next for Federal Education Funding

In a recent interview, Rep. Tom Cole, R-Okla., the chairman of the House appropriations subcommittee that oversees the U.S. Department of Education budget, said that while he has certain ideas about how federal spending on schools might shape up in the near future, he’ll want to get a lot of input first from President Donald Trump’s administration. And he highlighted the importance of federal spending on students with disabilities. 

Latest News

How the Complex History of Teacher Pay in Washington Slows Down Education Funding Solutions

To understand the landmark McCleary school-funding case, and a big reason why state lawmakers are struggling to reach a final settlement, you have to understand something called TRI pay.

TRI, which stands for additional time, responsibility and incentive, is a big chunk of local money originally intended to pay teachers for extras like serving as a high-school department chair or staying after school to tutor struggling students.

Latest News

Charter Schools Blur Line Between Religious, Public Education

From the standpoint of democratic theory, the basic problem with school choice is this: Religious belief and affiliation can be vital sites of civic learning for many Americans. In their temples, mosques, and megachurches, Americans learn to cooperate, organize, identify, and engage with social problems. These skills help them develop the kind of bonding capital that forms the basis of a democracy; from that platform, citizens can develop the bridging capital that allows them to identify with and engage civil society as a whole.

Latest News

Protesters Briefly Block Education Secretary Betsy DeVos’s Visit to a D.C. School

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos encountered protesters Friday morning outside a D.C. middle school and found her way barred as she tried to enter through a side door, forcing her to retreat into a government vehicle as a man shouted “Shame!”

Eventually, DeVos got inside for an event starting at about 10 a.m. that included the D.C. schools chancellor and others. The event was closed to the media.

But the demonstration outside Jefferson Middle School Academy was a further sign that DeVos remains a polarizing figure in the education world days after she took office.

Latest News

ACLU: Time Not Right for National Student ID

Despite calls from some quarters for a national student ID that would allow for better tracking of student outcomes, the Trump administration’s “outward hostility” to immigrants and Muslims makes now the worst possible time to implement such a thing.

That was the argument that Chad Marlow, advocacy and policy counsel at the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), put forth at a recent higher education forum at the University of Pennsylvania.

Latest News

Can Teachers Outsource Grading? Two Educators Explain What That Looks Like

Several years ago, two public schools in Michigan became teacher-powered—meaning, teachers have the autonomy to make decisions about what goes on with school operations. After that transition, one of the main areas the educators reevaluated was grading. 

Typically, teachers spend hours outside of school grading assignments. What would happen if that task was outsourced? 

Latest News

Betsy Devos Made Her First Visit to a School as Education Secretary: Howard University

Betsy DeVos, just sworn in as education secretary after Vice President Pence cast a tie-breaking vote in the Senate to confirm her appointment, visited Howard University on Thursday to meet with university leaders.

It was her first visit as secretary. On Friday, she visited Jefferson Academy, a public school in Washington, where protesters greeted her outside the school.

Latest News

Revenge of the Lunch Lady

In the fall of 2009, the British celebrity chef Jamie Oliver arrived in Huntington, West Virginia, which had recently been named the unhealthiest city in America. Huntingtonians were suffering in record numbers from diabetes and heart disease. They were being destroyed by the mountains of burgers and fries and nuggets that filled their restaurants, schools, refrigerators and arteries. They were fulfilling the prophecy that this generation of children would be the first to live shorter lives than their parents.

Latest News

The Next Generation of Charter School Innovation and Impact

The rapid growth of the charter school sector in its early years was often framed as an opportunity to improve public education. Charter schools, with fewer bureaucratic hurdles, would be able to innovate and create a pipeline for improvement strategies that could circle back to the district-run schools and help everybody.

Member Stories

February 2-9
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

Lauren Camera writes for U.S. News & World Report that while DeVos may be a champion of school choice, she will need to take a piecemeal approach to expansion, as it is unclear whether measures like a voucher proposal would garner more support from lawmakers if pushed by DeVos.

On Kara Newhouse’s Women In STEM podcast for Lancaster Online, African-American teenagers from the Lancaster, Pennsylvania, school district share what they thought of the recent Oscar-nominated film “Hidden Figures.”

Latest News

New York’s Renewal Program Has Inconsistent Success

NEW YORK — The zone for Public School 67 was drawn exclusively around the sprawling Ingersoll public-housing complex, but as children trudge into the building, they can see the tips of the gleaming glass luxury towers that are reshaping the skyline around them in downtown Brooklyn.

No children from those luxury condos have enrolled in P.S. 67. It has roughly 225 students; 99 percent are low-income. The school has struggled to stem sliding enrollment and to address poor safety ratings by parents and test scores that were among the worst in the city.

Latest News

Jacques: Opponents Make DeVos ‘More Resolute’

Washington — Betsy DeVos sometimes found it hard to keep her composure during her grueling confirmation process as the nation’s new education secretary. The ferocious and largely personal attacks on her character and commitment to promoting school choice were withering.

Latest News

Education Boss Gets First Assignment — Mend Fences With Foes

WASHINGTON (AP) — On her first day on the job, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos plunged into her initial assignment: mending fences with her opponents following a bruising confirmation battle. Parents across the country looked for clues as to whether she will fulfill their hopes or reinforce their fears.

Addressing several hundred Education Department staff members, DeVos, a wealthy Republican donor and school choice champion, vowed to work with everyone, including her critics, in ensuring the best education in the nation’s schools.

Latest News

Inside the Nation’s First Bilingual University

Seated in a sparkling new classroom at the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley’s Edinburg campus, with rolling chairs in the school colors — blue, green and burnt orange — students inched closer together to debate the value of innate ability versus hard work. Their conversations might have occurred in any first-year seminar, but for one key difference: They took place in both English and Spanish, often at the same time.

Latest News

Betsy Devos Can Change Education In America Without Doing A Thing

Education secretary nominee Betsy DeVos narrowly squeaked through the Senate on Monday, winning confirmation by a vote of 51 to 50 after Vice President Mike Pence weighed in to break the tie.

DeVos is the most controversial education secretary ever. She was confirmed with fewer votes than any Cabinet secretary in history. If Democrats hadn’t abolished the filibuster on executive branch nominees in 2013, DeVos’s opposition would have relegated her to the heap of Cabinet might-have-beens.

Latest News

What Educators, Advocacy Groups Are Saying About Betsy Devos’ Rocky Confirmation

Education and advocacy groups reacted swiftly to Betsy DeVos’ confirmation as U.S. Secretary of Education Tuesday, with supporters praising the West Michigan native and opponents questioning whether she’ll promote school choice at the expense of traditional public schools.

DeVos was confirmed following a marathon 24-hour debate in the Senate, where Democrats decried the West Michigan native as inexperienced and said her support of taxpayer-funded vouchers and charter schools have undermined traditional public schools.

Latest News

With Historic Tiebreaker From Pence, Devos Confirmed As Education Secretary

The Senate confirmed Betsy DeVos as education secretary Tuesday by the narrowest of margins, with Vice President Pence casting a historic tiebreaking vote after senators deadlocked over her fitness for the job.

DeVos now takes the helm of the Education Department with questions about whether and how the polarizing fight over her confirmation will affect her power to advance the Trump administration’s agenda.

Latest News

Under New Leadership, FCC Quashes Report on E-rate Program’s Success

The Federal Communications Commission on Friday rescinded its own report documenting the success of the E-rate program, a multi-billion dollar FCC-led initiative that has helped tens of thousands of schools and libraries obtain high-speed internet access.

The report will have “no legal or other effect or meaning going forward,” according to the commission’s order.

The move prompted sharp criticism from education and open-government groups.