EWA Reporting Fellowship

Overview

Reporting Fellowship Program

The EWA Reporting Fellowship provides financial awards to education journalists to undertake ambitious reporting and writing projects. The EWA Reporting Fellows are selected by EWA through a competitive application process. Each fellow receives a financial award to support an education reporting project, as well as other assistance.

The EWA Reporting Fellowship provides financial awards to education journalists to undertake ambitious reporting and writing projects. The EWA Reporting Fellows are selected by EWA through a competitive application process. Each fellow receives a financial award to support an education reporting project, as well as other assistance.

Key Coverage

Struggles of New East Baltimore School Show Challenges of Integration

On the day that the Henderson-Hopkins school opened its doors to let children in, Crystal Jordan marveled at its light-filled rooms, curving stairs and interior play areas.

She couldn’t believe her family’s good fortune. In a city with so many struggling schools, her fifth-grade daughter was entering a new public school backed by some of the city’s most powerful institutions, and driven by a vision in which students of all socioeconomic backgrounds would learn together, and be held to high standards.

Latest News

Bridging the Divide

People of every race and class live in southwestern Baltimore County. But many have moved into neighborhoods — and sent their children to schools — with people who look like them. To the south of U.S. 40 are the predominantly white communities that feed Hillcrest, Catonsville, Westchester and Westowne elementary schools. To the north are the largely black communities that feed Edmondson Heights and Johnnycake elementaries.

Announcement

EWA Invites Education Journalists to Apply for Fellowships With Global Lens
2017 EWA Reporting Fellowship: U.S. Education in Global Context

The Education Writers Association is pleased to announce a call for proposals for its next class of EWA Reporting Fellows, this time with a focus on U.S. education in an international context. The fellowships provide financial awards to journalists to undertake ambitious reporting and writing projects. This will be the third class of EWA Reporting Fellows.

Information

FAQs About the 2017 EWA Reporting Fellowship: U.S. Education in Global Context
Applications Due March 27, 2017

What is the EWA Reporting Fellowship?

The EWA Reporting Fellowship provides financial awards to education journalists to undertake special reporting and writing projects.

How many fellowships will be awarded?

EWA expects to award approximately three fellowships in this round of the program.

How much money comes with the fellowship?

EWA will provide awards of up to $8,000 a piece to winning proposals.

Latest News

How Can Community Colleges Get More Students to Graduate?

When Jerry O’Neal went to school a couple of decades ago, career services was something you went to as you were getting ready to graduate and didn’t have a job lined up.

That’s not true for his daughter, Lisa O’Neal, who is in her first year at Sinclair Community College in Dayton, Ohio. She’s starting her academic career thinking about career services and what she wants to do when it she gets out.

Key Coverage

Why Aren’t There More Michigan Community College Graduates?

Chelsea Wilson thought she knew what going to college would be like. But she realized it didn’t match her picture of what it would be — a picture she had in her mind’s eye from the movies.

“I felt so out of place,” Wilson, 20, of Taylor said of that year at Schoolcraft College in Livonia. “I had no clue what I was doing.” So she left Schoolcraft  and started working. She’s hardly alone in dropping out of a community college.

Announcement

EWA Announces New Education Reporting Fellows

EWA Reporting Fellowship

The Education Writers Association is pleased to announce its second class of EWA Reporting Fellows, under an initiative aimed at supporting enterprising journalism projects.

“We were heartened by the quality of the applications and the continued enthusiasm among EWA members for pursuing in-depth reporting projects,” said Caroline Hendrie, EWA’s executive director. “We expect the fellows’ work to advance important conversations about policies and practices shaping America’s schools.”

Announcement

EWA Invites Education Journalists to Apply for Fellowships

The Education Writers Association is pleased to announce a call for proposals for its next class of EWA Reporting Fellows. Entering its second year, the highly sought-after fellowships provide financial awards to education journalists to undertake ambitious reporting and writing projects.

EWA Radio

Chartering a New Course: KIPP’s Katrina Generation Goes to College
EWA Radio: Episode 93

Students march in parade holding a KIPP Central City Academy banner.

When Hurricane Katrina swept through New Orleans in 2005, much of the city’s infrastructure was washed away — including its public education system. Changes imposed after the storm have produced a system primarily of charter schools which are independently operated and publicly funded — including those run by the KIPP network.

In the new series “Higher Ground” (for NOLA.com/The Times Picayune), reporter Danielle Dreilinger looks at where the city’s KIPP’s graduates wind up after graduation. She talks with EWA public editor Emily Richmond about the project (part of the EWA Reporting Fellowship program), and how the high-achieving charter network is seeking to improve New Orleans’ students chances of postsecondary success. 

Key Coverage

Higher Ground: KIPP Strives To Lift New Orleans Grads Past Their Struggles

Eleven years ago, as Hurricane Katrina’s floodwaters receded, experts promised to transform the city by upending its schools, fixing poverty and crime by and through degrees. …

Far more students graduate from New Orleans public high schools now: 75 percent, up from 54 percent before the storm …

But the real test is what happens after high school. The new New Orleans won’t materialize if beaming teenagers walk off the graduation dais as if it were a gangplank.

Key Coverage

Why Appalachian Colleges Are Recruiting Hispanics

More of the teenagers graduating from high schools in Appalachia look like Janeth Barrera Cantu, and fewer look like the middle- and upper-class whites from which local colleges and universities have historically drawn their enrollments. So Lenoir-Rhyne and other schools in the region have started trying to recruit Hispanics, who—like Barrera Cantu—increasingly want college educations.

Key Coverage

From the Reservation to College

President Obama wants more American Indian students to graduate from college. But look at the challenges these high schoolers face, and it becomes clear why that is a tall order.

Read more from an occasional series of articles on the transition to college for students at Browning High School on the Blackfeet Indian Reservation in Montana.