Event: From Preescolar to Postsecundaria

Overview

From Preescolar to Postsecundaria
Covering Latino Education

This fall, the share of K-12 students in the United States who are Latino is projected to climb to nearly one quarter, a figure expected to rise to nearly 30 percent by 2022. And proportionately more Hispanic students are enrolling in postsecondary education than white, non-Hispanic students.

This fall, the share of K-12 students in the United States who are Latino is projected to climb to nearly one quarter, a figure expected to rise to nearly 30 percent by 2022. And proportionately more Hispanic students are enrolling in postsecondary education than white, non-Hispanic students.

Especially for journalists working for the Spanish-language media, understanding how trends in education are affecting Latino students — and how Latinos are shaping those trends — is increasingly important. To give journalists a solid grounding in those issues, EWA is offering its first-ever convening for Spanish-language reporters and editors. 

From Preescolar to Postsecundaria: Covering Latino Education” will explore a range of critical issues influencing the education of Hispanic students across the country. Slated for Sept. 4 in Dallas, the one-day seminar for journalists will address such topics as the impact of immigration on education, the testing of English-language learners, and how Latino families are financing college. Featured speakers will include journalists and education experts.

Prospective attendees are also encouraged to remain in Dallas to attend EWA’s annual Higher Education Seminar, for which scholarships are also available. That event — “The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: Covering the College Student Experience“— will take place Sept. 5-6 at Southern Methodist University in Dallas immediately after the seminar for Spanish-language media. 

 

Overview

From Preescolar to Postsecundaria
Covering Latino Education

Para el comienzo de este año escolar, se proyecta que uno de cada cuatro estudiantes K-12 en los E.U. va a ser latino. Para el año 2022, esa cifra puede llegar a los 30 por ciento. Y cada vez hay más estudiantes hispanos participando en estudios postsecundarios, comparado con los estudiantes blancos que no son hispanos.

Para el comienzo de este año escolar, se proyecta que uno de cada cuatro estudiantes K-12 en los E.U. va a ser latino. Para el año 2022, esa cifra puede llegar a los 30 por ciento. Y cada vez hay más estudiantes hispanos participando en estudios postsecundarios, comparado con los estudiantes blancos que no son hispanos.

Es cada vez más importante entender cómo las tendencias en la educación están afectando a los estudiantes latinos, además de conocer la manera en que los latinos están creando nuevas tendencias, sobre todo para los periodistas que trabajan en los medios en español.

Desde la educación infantil temprana a la postsecundaria: cubriendo la educación de los latinos”, va a explorar una amplia gama de los temas de peso en la educación de estudiantes hispanos a través del país. Programado para el 4 de sept. en Dallas, el seminario para periodistas va a tratar temas tales como: el impacto de la inmigración sobre la educación, las calificaciones a los estudiantes que están aprendiendo inglés como segundo idioma y cómo las familias latinas están financiando los estudios universitarios.

Urgimos a los periodistas que trabajan para los medios en español a que apliquen para las becas que ofrecemos ya que ellas cubren todos los costos de asistencia al seminario.

También queremos animar a los que estén pensando en asistir, a que se queden en Dallas para aprovechar el “Higher Education Seminar”, un evento anual de EWA para el cual hay becas disponibles. Ese evento, titulado, “The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: Covering the College Student Experience” (Lo bueno, lo feo y lo malo: cubriendo la experiencia de ser estudiante universitario), tomará lugar el 5 y 6 de sept. en el Southern Methodist University en Dallas, después del seminario por los periodistas de lengua española.

Seminar

Covering Latino Education in the Trump Era
EWA’s Fourth Annual Spanish-Language Media Convening

The election of Donald Trump has produced a sea change in the political landscape, with big implications for the education of Hispanic children and youths. What are the key issues and developments that Spanish-language journalists in the U.S. should understand and track as they help their audiences make sense of this new era?

Anaheim, Calif.
Blog: Latino Ed Beat

Recent Tragedies Hit Home for EWA

Jay Torres, 57, was killed in Garland, Texas, this week. He was an inaugural member of EWA's annual Spanish-language media convening and beloved by many as a respected journalist and photographer in the Forth Worth area. Source: Rebecca Aguilar (Used with permission)

It feels like we were just in Orlando at Valencia College, sharing a campus with seven students who lost their lives early Sunday morning in the deadliest mass shooting in modern American history. 

Blog: Latino Ed Beat

Cultural Values and the Path to Early Academic Success

Selma Caal of Child Trends Hispanic Institute, Paulina Sodi of Telemundo Houston, and José Lizárraga of the University of California, Berkeley participated in a panel discussion on educating young Latinos during the 2015 Spanish-Language Media Convening in Orlando on Sept. 17. Source: Twitter/ via @PaulinaSodi

Latino children enter kindergarten with socioemotional skills that are on par and sometimes even better than their non-Latino peers’ abilities. This means they’re on track in their capability to make friends and behave in school. But Latinos also have a greater probability of arriving to their first day of classes behind their peers academically.

Blog: Latino Ed Beat

Through ‘Mexodus,’ Insights on Immigration Stories

The Mexodus project captures stories of violence-weary Hispanics who have crossed the border into the U.S. for a chance at a safer life. Source: Raymundo Aguirre/Borderzine.com

Fourteen-year-old Mariana of Chihuahua, Mexico, was kidnapped by 20 men dressed as police officers just days before she was to celebrate her passage to womanhood at her quinceañeraFor two days, they held her captive while her parents struggled to pay the $8,000 they had demanded for Mariana’s ransom. Upon her release, Mariana’s family escaped to the United States, leaving everything behind.

Blog: Latino Ed Beat

English Language Learners: Identifying Inconsistencies

Robert Linquanti discusses the various processes states use to identify English language learners. Source: Jay Torres, Diario La Estrella

Who are English language learners?

Some would argue there’s no consistent answer.

Robert Linquanti, the bilingual project director for English Learner Evaluation and Accountability Support at WestEd, presented on the topic at the EWA Spanish-Language Media Convening in Dallas earlier this month.

Blog: Latino Ed Beat

Adding It Up: Financial Aid and Latino Students

Deborah Santiago shares information on financial aid at the EWA Spanish-Language Media Convening. Source: Jay Torres, Diario La Estrella

“How will I pay for college?”

Sound familiar? I’m still asking myself this question three years after I graduated.

Though not unique to college-bound Latino students, this question is one many of them face – perhaps even more dauntingly than their peers.

Deborah Santiago of Excelencia in Education discussed the process of college finance as it particularly relates to Latinos at the Education Writers Association’s Spanish-Language Media Convening in Dallas Sept. 4.

Blog: Latino Ed Beat

Surprising Stats About Latino Students

Mark Hugo Lopez of Pew Research Center's Hispanic Trends Project addresses attendees of EWA's first Spanish-Language Media Convening in Dallas. 
Source: Jay Torres, Diario La Estrella

Is the future of America “brown”?

That question was asked of Mark Hugo Lopez, director of Hispanic research for the Pew Research Center, at EWA’s first Spanish-Language Media Convening in Dallas last Thursday. The reporter who asked the question was referring to the future of Latinos in the United States.

Lopez kicked off the conference with a session on Hispanic student demographics. He began his talk by spouting off some statistics:

Agenda

From Preescolar to Postsecundaria: Covering Latino Education

8-8:45 a.m. Breakfast

The Cube, 1st Floor, Hotel Lumen

8:45-9 a.m. Welcome

Photon Room, 2nd Floor

9-10 a.m. Portrait of the Student Population

Mark Hugo Lopez of the Pew Research Center’s Hispanic Trends Project will provide reporters with the numbers: enrollment trends, surveys, and other key information about Hispanic student demographics that reporters should know.