Education & the 2016 White House Race

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Overview

Education & the 2016 White House Race
Nov. 19, 9:00 a.m. to Noon • National Press Club

 

In the campaign for the White House, education has gained considerable attention, from proposals to make college debt-free to sharp criticism of the Common Core standards. The fault lines are not simply between Democrats and Republicans, but also among candidates in each of the two parties, and competing factions in their political ranks.

To help both education and political journalists better understand—and more effectively cover—how education issues are playing out in the campaign, the Education Writers Association is holding a morning-long forum in Washington, D.C., on Nov. 19. You’ll hear from a politically diverse mix of experts and advocates, as well as journalists who know the ins and outs of education policy and politics. Topics our speakers will tackle include:

  • How are the candidates talking about education and what are their concrete plans? What are they downplaying or ignoring?
  • How substantive—or not—are their agendas?
  • With the primaries on the horizon, how significant are the distinctions on education policy within each party’s set of candidates?
  • What’s the backstory and political context for how the issue is being framed by both Republican and Democratic candidates?
  • What should reporters know about the track records of candidates, especially current and former governors, given their key role in education policy and funding?
  • What impact will the early endorsement of Hillary Clinton by the teachers’ unions have on the race, and how candidates treat education issues?
  • What realistically can a president accomplish when it comes to education, anyway?

The event will feature a pair of panel discussions—one taking a deep dive into pre-K-12 issues, the other higher education. In addition, a roundtable of experienced journalists will offer their analysis of what’s happening and what’s ahead, with tips for effective and enterprising coverage.

When: 9:00 a.m. to noon, Nov. 19, 2015
Where: National Press Club, 529 14th Street, NW, Washington, D.C.

 

In the campaign for the White House, education has gained considerable attention, from proposals to make college debt-free to sharp criticism of the Common Core standards. The fault lines are not simply between Democrats and Republicans, but also among candidates in each of the two parties, and competing factions in their political ranks.

To help both education and political journalists better understand—and more effectively cover—how education issues are playing out in the campaign, the Education Writers Association is holding a morning-long forum in Washington, D.C., on Nov. 19. You’ll hear from a politically diverse mix of experts and advocates, as well as journalists who know the ins and outs of education policy and politics. Topics our speakers will tackle include:

  • How are the candidates talking about education and what are their concrete plans? What are they downplaying or ignoring?
  • How substantive—or not—are their agendas?
  • With the primaries on the horizon, how significant are the distinctions on education policy within each party’s set of candidates?
  • What’s the backstory and political context for how the issue is being framed by both Republican and Democratic candidates?
  • What should reporters know about the track records of candidates, especially current and former governors, given their key role in education policy and funding?
  • What impact will the early endorsement of Hillary Clinton by the teachers’ unions have on the race, and how candidates treat education issues?
  • What realistically can a president accomplish when it comes to education, anyway?

The event will feature a pair of panel discussions—one taking a deep dive into pre-K-12 issues, the other higher education. In addition, a roundtable of experienced journalists will offer their analysis of what’s happening and what’s ahead, with tips for effective and enterprising coverage.

When: 9:00 a.m. to noon, Nov. 19, 2015
Where: National Press Club, 529 14th Street, NW, Washington, D.C.

Multimedia

What College Affordability Means for the Election
Education & the 2016 White House Race

What College Affordability Means for the Election

College affordability has become a key topic in the 2016 presidential campaign, whether through Democratic candidates’ outlining varying approaches to a debt-free education at public universities or Republican contenders’ suggesting income-sharing arrangements and accreditation reform. A discussion of the nuances and potential of these ideas.

  • Jason Delisle, New America
  • Terry Hartle, American Council on Education
  • Neal McCluskey, Cato Institute
  • Colin Seeberger, Young Invincibles
  • Kimberly Hefling, Politico (moderator)