Doing More With Higher Ed Data

Overview

Doing More With Higher Ed Data: From Policy to Newsrooms
Philadelphia • February 2–3, 2017

With colleges and universities under increased pressure to ensure that more students earn degrees without amassing mountains of debt, journalists are at the forefront in examining how these institutions  measure up. But there’s one major obstacle that both colleges and reporters share when it comes to making sense of how well these schools are meeting their goals: insufficient data. Many key statistics available about colleges are effectively incomplete or overly burdensome to gather, making it difficult for journalists, higher education leaders, and policymakers to get the answers they need.

On February 2-3, 2017, EWA will gather journalists for a two-day conference in Philadelphia, hosted by the University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Education, to help journalists learn more about the role data plays in shaping the landscape of postsecondary education. Experts will discuss initiatives to improve the collection and availability of student-level data at the national level, including a look at the potential challenges of keeping better track of students while also protecting their privacy. This conference additionally will offer several workshops led by journalists highly experienced in using education data. They will help their peers sharpen their skills at making the best use of the data currently available for postsecondary institutions.

With colleges and universities under increased pressure to ensure that more students earn degrees without amassing mountains of debt, journalists are at the forefront in examining how these institutions  measure up. But there’s one major obstacle that both colleges and reporters share when it comes to making sense of how well these schools are meeting their goals: insufficient data. Many key statistics available about colleges are effectively incomplete or overly burdensome to gather, making it difficult for journalists, higher education leaders, and policymakers to get the answers they need.

On February 2-3, 2017, EWA will gather journalists for a two-day conference in Philadelphia, hosted by the University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Education, to help journalists learn more about the role data plays in shaping the landscape of postsecondary education. Experts will discuss initiatives to improve the collection and availability of student-level data at the national level, including a look at the potential challenges of keeping better track of students while also protecting their privacy. This conference additionally will offer several workshops led by journalists highly experienced in using education data. They will help their peers sharpen their skills at making the best use of the data currently available for postsecondary institutions.

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The debate has been revived in some states as President Donald Trump pursues tougher immigration policies.

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Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo’s office never pretended anything else, announcing over the weekend that the program will “provide tuition-free college to middle class families.”

Blog: Higher Ed Beat

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Multimedia

New President, New Higher Education Agenda
Doing More With Higher Ed Data

During his time in office, President Obama substantially altered the landscape of postsecondary education, from making the federal government the direct lender of student loans to changing the climate for how colleges address allegations of sexual assault. Journalists who cover federal policy on higher education offer insights and story ideas about issues to track, from the regulation of for-profit colleges to the reauthorization of the Higher Education Act.