Covering Charter Schools at the 25-Year Mark

Pixabay/Alain Audet
Overview

Covering Charter Schools at the 25-Year Mark
Los Angeles • January 26–27, 2017

Journalist-only Seminar on Charter Schools.

Barely a day goes by that charter schools aren’t in the news somewhere. A quarter century after the first state law allowing charters was enacted, the sector has expanded to serve upwards of 2.5 million students in 43 states. With this growth has come increased attention —  and intense scrutiny.

How do key goals of charter advocates — whether choice and competition, improved student outcomes, or innovation — square with the reality today? What’s going right, what’s going wrong? In this EWA seminar for journalists, we examine some of the most pressing issues in charter schooling today, including academic achievement, access and equity, student segregation and diversity, innovation, discipline, special education, and teacher unionizing efforts. Participants will come away with a deeper understanding of the issues and context of charter schools, plus a wealth of story ideas to pursue.

This journalists-only seminar was held January 26 and 27 in Los Angeles, California.

Journalist-only Seminar on Charter Schools.

Barely a day goes by that charter schools aren’t in the news somewhere. A quarter century after the first state law allowing charters was enacted, the sector has expanded to serve upwards of 2.5 million students in 43 states. With this growth has come increased attention —  and intense scrutiny.

How do key goals of charter advocates — whether choice and competition, improved student outcomes, or innovation — square with the reality today? What’s going right, what’s going wrong? In this EWA seminar for journalists, we examine some of the most pressing issues in charter schooling today, including academic achievement, access and equity, student segregation and diversity, innovation, discipline, special education, and teacher unionizing efforts. Participants will come away with a deeper understanding of the issues and context of charter schools, plus a wealth of story ideas to pursue.

This journalists-only seminar was held January 26 and 27 in Los Angeles, California.

Blog: The Educated Reporter

USC Charter School Sets Students’ Sights on College

The waiting list to get into USC Hybrid High College Prep in downtown Los Angeles is long – about two students for every one admitted – and so is the commute for many of the students who go there. An hour-and-a-half each way by bus or car isn’t uncommon.

Blog: The Educated Reporter

Trump Begins to Flesh Out School Choice Agenda, But Questions Remain

There was no missing the symbolism in President Donald Trump’s first school visit since taking office — a stop at St. Andrew Catholic School in Orlando, Florida, this month.

St. Andrew is “one of the many parochial schools dedicated to the education of some of our most disadvantaged children,” Trump noted, and it’s been helped along by school choice policy.

Blog: The Educated Reporter

After 25 Years, No Shortage of Charter Schools Research

Do charter schools really outperform traditional public schools? Is any such comparison skewed by the caliber of students who attend charters and their district-run counterparts?

Few questions are more contested in education policy circles, but 25 years since the first charter school opened in Minnesota, there is more data available than ever to find answers. Two prominent education researchers waded into the debate over charter schools and charter research at a recent Education Writers Association seminar in Los Angeles.

Blog: The Educated Reporter

What’s Ahead for School Choice in the Trump Era?

If anyone doubted that school choice would be a top educational priority for the Trump administration, the Republican president’s first address to a joint session of Congress laid that question to rest.

“I am calling upon members of both parties to pass an education bill that funds school choice for disadvantaged youth, including millions of African-American and Latino children,” he declared. “These families should be free to choose the public, private, charter, magnet, religious or home school that is right for them.”

Blog: The Educated Reporter

What Does Charter School Innovation Look Like?

At Summit Public Schools campuses, you won’t see PowerPoint lectures on “Antigone” in English class or witness lofty explanations of the Pythagorean theorem in geometry. Instead, you’ll hear a discussion about the morals and ethics in the ancient Greek tragedy tied to students’ own teenage identity formation and observe discussions on how real-life problem-solving skills can be applied to math.

Blog: The Educated Reporter

How Should Charter Schools Be Held Accountable?

In the contentious debates over what is a good school, parents are frequently pitted against public officials. The stakes are especially high for charter schools, which periodically must be granted a new lease on life.

It’s a case of one side pointing to test scores or compliance with various rules of operation, and the other invoking their satisfaction with the school in ways that may be hard to measure. While regulators may be tempted to close a low-performing school, parents regularly object.

Blog: The Educated Reporter

Camino Nuevo Offers Families a Bilingual Choice

At 10 years old, Audrey Campos is the one who helps her 18-year-old cousin communicate with their grandparents. Unlike her cousin, Audrey speaks Spanish. That’s thanks, in part, to the public school she attends, part of the Camino Nuevo Charter Academy network.

Audrey was in the inaugural kindergarten class for the school’s bilingual program in 2011. She spent 80 percent of her day learning in Spanish that first year, though now Audrey speaks and hears mostly English in school.

Latest News

The Next Generation of Charter School Innovation and Impact

The rapid growth of the charter school sector in its early years was often framed as an opportunity to improve public education. Charter schools, with fewer bureaucratic hurdles, would be able to innovate and create a pipeline for improvement strategies that could circle back to the district-run schools and help everybody.

Blog: The Educated Reporter

School Segregation: Are Charter Schools the Problem?

Kriste Dragon grew up in Atlanta, a mixed-race child in a segregated school system.

When it came time to find a school for her children in her new Hollywood home, Dragon was hopeful that the neighborhood’s highly diverse demographics would be reflected in its schools. But instead, she found a low-performing school system that was as segregated — or worse — as what she’d experienced growing up.

Latest News

Eli Broad’s Opposition to DeVos Reveals Faultlines in Charter School Movement

Philanthropist Eli Broad’s opposition to Betsy DeVos, President Donald Trump’s nominee to be U.S. secretary of education, underscores the complexity of the politics of the charter school movement, and is revealing further fault lines in it. In a remarkably blunt letter to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, he portrayed DeVos as a threat to the public education system in the United States.

Latest News

The Learning Curve: A Local Look at Charters and Segregation

The NAACP, the country’s oldest civil rights organization, made headlines last summer when it called for a moratorium on charter school expansion. Now, the group is holding a series of town hall meetings across the country, including one scheduled for later this month in Pasadena.

Multimedia

VIDEO: School Choice Policy & Politics in the Trump Era
Covering Charter Schools

What will President Trump and his administration mean for charter schools and school choice? Will the new president put political muscle behind his campaign pledge to create a new, $20 billion school choice program? How will the GOP-led Congress respond? What are the ramifications of key statewide elections, especially gains by Republicans and the defeat of a high-profile Massachusetts ballot measure to raise that state’s charter cap?

Information

Information for Charter Schools Seminar Attendees
Addresses, Hours & Logistics

Registration & Badge Pick Up

Thursday – Friday
Opens at 11:30 a.m. on Thursday and 8 a.m. on Friday.

Location
USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism
Wallis Annenberg Hall
3502 Watt Way
Los Angeles, CA 90089

Badges are required to attend all seminar events and meals.

Session Location

Location
USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism
3502 Watt Way
Los Angeles, CA 90089