Blog: Latino Ed Beat

Overview

Latino Ed Beat

A blog about issues affecting Latino students in P-12 and post-secondary education.

A blog about issues affecting Latino students in P-12 and post-secondary education.

Blog: Latino Ed Beat

The Role of Catholic Schools in Latino Education

Catholic schools have long been a foothold for the children of immigrants. For my parents, the products of Catholic education in Ecuador, these schools were a natural first choice for their children.

But in recent years, the growth of charter schools, rising tuition costs and the increasing number of Latinos joining evangelical Protestant churches has threatened the survival of Catholic schools across the country. Schools in urban or low-income areas, where Latino students often make up the majority of students, are among those most in danger of closing.

Blog: Latino Ed Beat

Educare Comes to the Suburbs

In April, construction started on a new Educare center in West Chicago, a suburb in Illinois’ DuPage County, about 30 miles west of the Windy City.  Educare is nationally recognized for providing high-quality early care and instruction for children from birth to age five. Educare of West DuPage, as the new center is known, is their first site in a suburban location.

Blog: Latino Ed Beat

Deportation Affects Education of U.S.-born Children

Much has been written about the plight of the U.S.-born children of illegal immigrants. In recent years, stepped-up deportation has divided thousands of families or forced parents to yank their children from the only country they’ve known. Many of the stories I’ve read look at the effects on the adults and the family as a whole.

Blog: Latino Ed Beat

How Does Your State Count Multiracial Students?

The state of Texas has a tendency to do things its own way when it comes to education.

It is one of only a handful of states that have not adopted the Common Core State Standards. The Lone Star state’s textbook adoption process routinely grabs headlines. Now, according to this story in the Houston Chronicle, Texas has decided not to count the standardized test scores of multiracial students in the state’s accountability ratings.

Blog: Latino Ed Beat

Comic Books for English Language Learners

As an admitted fan girl who dreams of attending the San Diego Comic-Com, this story about a panel featuring students from Imperial County, California caught my attention. For the last three years, school district students have been working with the Comic Book Project to create comic books as part of a program to develop literacy and English language skills.

Blog: Latino Ed Beat

Research Examines How Latino Students Are Disciplined

A study tracking the disciplinary records of nearly a million Texas students exposed some startling findings:

Nearly 60 percent of the students were suspended or expelled at least once during middle school or high school. About 31 percent of the students received an out-of-school suspension.

About 15 percent were suspended or expelled 11 times or more. About half of those students ended up in the juvenile justice system.

Blog: Latino Ed Beat

Weighing Budget Cuts Against Latino Childhood Obesity

How might school funding cuts affect efforts to fight the obesity epidemic among Latino children?

That question was the focus of the Latino Childhood Obesity Education Summit, held last week in San Antonio. As reported here in the San Antonio Express News, experts worry that an expected $4 billion in state funding cuts could hurt the ability of Texas school districts to continue programs intended to fight obesity.

Blog: Latino Ed Beat

How Will States Support Latino Preschoolers Through Race to the Top?

This week, my story on what states are likely to do to win Race to the Top-Early Learning Challenge grants was published by Education Week. The story gives a good national overview of the kinds of things states will be encouraged to do to win the money: build data systems, create quality ratings for daycare centers and other early learning programs, and so forth.