2014 Teachers

Overview

The Push to Upgrade the Teaching Profession: What Reporters Need To Know
For Journalists Only

The event was held Oct. 20–21, 2014, in Detroit, Michigan.

This intensive, journalists-only seminar will focus on a range of hard-fought changes under way that together are rewriting the rules of the U.S. teaching profession. What are the roots of today’s controversies over teacher training, tenure, evaluation and pay? In a pivotal year in the push for new standards and tests, are teachers still on board?  What does the nation’s new majority-minority student population mean for classroom teachers? How are teacher colleges responding to new accountability pressures?

Participants in this two-day reporting workshop — co-hosted by the Michigan State University College of Education — will explore these questions and more with leading educators and journalists, including the authors of recent high-profile books on teaching. And reporters will take home blueprints for compelling stories that will bring to life the complex teacher-related trends playing out in their own communities.

Questions regarding the event? Feel free to contact Rachel Wolin at rwolin@ewa.org. 

Blog: The Educated Reporter

Talking To Teachers: Story Ideas For Reporters

For education reporters looking for story ideas, talking to teachers is a smart place to start. That was the key takeaway from the “Performance and Perceptions: Taking the Pulse of the Profession” session at EWA’s recent seminar on the teaching profession, held last month in Detroit.

Blog: The Educated Reporter

Using Teacher Data to Drive Education Reporting

Tom Nehil and Beth Hawkins of the MinnPost speak with EWA members in Detroit on Oct. 21, 2014. (EWA/Emily Richmond)

In the Minneapolis Public Schools, nearly two-thirds of the district’s enrollment are students of color. Additionally, 65 percent of the district’s more than 35,000 students qualify for free and reduced-price meals. Beth Hawkins, a reporter for the MinnPost, had a hunch that the best-paid local teachers were working in the wealthiest schools, teaching white students. But this was just a guess, and her colleague at the nonprofit news site, data editor Tom Nehil, wanted to see the numbers. 

Blog: The Educated Reporter

What It Takes to Build Great Teachers

Author Elizabeth Green speaks to EWA members in Detroit on Oct. 21, 2014. (Emily Richmond/EWA)

If 49 multiplied by 5 is 245, why would a student think the answer is 405? And who is more likely to know this – a mathematician or an elementary math teacher?

Elizabeth Green, the author of “Building a Better Teacher: How Teaching Works (And How to Teach It to Everyone), posed this question to a roomful of education reporters at EWA’s October seminar in Detroit.  

Blog: The Educated Reporter

‘The Teacher Wars’: Everything Old Is New Again

Dana Goldstein speaks with Greg Toppo in Detroit on Oct. 20, 2014. (Michael Marriott/EWA)

Education might seem more incendiary and political than ever before, but author Dana Goldstein argues that today’s biggest policy fights aren’t exactly new battles.

“We’ve been fighting about teachers for 175 years,” said Goldstein at EWA’s October seminar on teaching, held in Detroit. At the event, Goldstein discussed her new book, The Teacher Wars, published in September.

Blog: The Educated Reporter

Teaching Math: More Than Mastering the Numbers

Dean Deborah Loewenberg Ball, University of Michigan School of Education, speaks to EWA members in Detroit on Oct. 21, 2014. (Emily Richmond)

Deborah Loewenberg Ball began her career as an elementary school teacher, working for 15 years with a diverse population of students. But math stumped her.

“That troubled me,” Ball said Oct. 21 during her keynote presentation at the EWA seminar on teaching held in Detroit. “I would work really hard on how could I make the math make sense to the students, … but on Fridays they would know how to do things and on Monday they would have forgotten.”

Blog: The Educated Reporter

Raising the Bar For Teacher Colleges

Left to right: Stephen Sawchuk, Education Week; Jim Cibulka, CAEP; Segun Eubanks, NEA; Kate Walsh, NCTQ at the Detroit Center, Oct. 21, 2014. (Source: NEA Media)

As the nation centers its attention on the Common Core State Standards battle brewing across the states, a lesser known overhaul is underway for America’s teachers-to-be.

Blog: The Educated Reporter

The Teaching Profession: What Reporters Need to Know

Teacher Carmen Perry, left, talks with EWA members at the International Academy for Young Women, a single-gender public school, on Oct. 20, 2014. (Emily Richmond/EWA)

The stakes have arguably never been higher for public school teachers, who are facing not only an increasingly challenging student population but also new demands for accountability and performance. What lies ahead for the nation’s largest profession, with the rollout of new academic standards and new assessments to gauge how effectively students are being taught?

Multimedia

Teacher College Accountability: Changes on Horizon
EWA Seminar on Teaching

Teacher College Accountability: Changes on Horizon

With an eye to toughening admission standards and curricula, a massive overhaul of the credentialing standards for the nation’s teacher preparation programs is underway. But given that participation is voluntary, are ongoing changes enough? What more needs to be done to improve such programs? And how should policymakers, taxpayers and potential students judge the quality of teacher preparation programs?

Panelists:

Multimedia

Teaching Across Cultural Differences: Equity in Instruction and Classrooms
EWA Seminar on Teaching

Teaching Across Cultural Differences: Equity in Instruction and Classrooms

How are cultural and racial biases influencing classroom instruction and student learning? What does this mean for teachers and students, particularly in high-minority, urban school settings? What should education reporters know about cultural bias as it relates to their reporting on students, teachers, and schools?

Speaker:
Associate Professor Dorinda Carter Andrews, Michigan State University

Multimedia

Teacher Induction and Mentoring: Liam Goldrick, New Teacher Center
EWA Seminar on Teaching

Teacher Induction and Mentoring: Liam Goldrick, New Teacher Center

For new teachers, the first few years on the job can present a steep learning curve. And the students who need the most experienced teachers often don’t get them. How are schools, districts and states ramping up the support provided to new teachers? What are the hallmarks of a high-quality induction program? And what does the research show on the effects of coaching and mentoring?

Panelist:

Multimedia

Taking the Pulse of the Teaching Profession: Andy Baxter
EWA Seminar on Teaching

Taking the Pulse of the Teaching Profession: Andy Baxter

Teacher effectiveness is a front-burner issue in districts nationwide. How are districts, state departments of education, and policymakers responding to the push to improve teacher performance and student outcomes? What does the latest research show on what’s working in public schools?

What does the new “Primary Sources” survey tell us about teachers’ perceptions of the Common Core State Standards? And what are teachers doing to reshape their classroom instruction in response to the new expectations for grade-level learning? 

Speaker:

Multimedia

Teacher Induction and Mentoring: Magdalene Lampert, Boston Residency Project
EWA Seminar on Teaching

Teacher Induction and Mentoring: Magdalene Lampert, Boston Residency Project

For new teachers, the first few years on the job can present a steep learning curve. And the students who need the most experienced teachers often don’t get them. How are schools, districts and states ramping up the support provided to new teachers? What are the hallmarks of a high-quality induction program? And what does the research show on the effects of coaching and mentoring?

Panelist:

Multimedia

Taking the Pulse of the Teaching Profession: Kyle Good
EWA Seminar on Teaching

Taking the Pulse of the Teaching Profession: Kyle Good

Teacher effectiveness is a front-burner issue in districts nationwide. How are districts, state departments of education, and policymakers responding to the push to improve teacher performance and student outcomes? What does the latest research show on what’s working in public schools?

What does the new “Primary Sources” survey tell us about teachers’ perceptions of the Common Core State Standards? And what are teachers doing to reshape their classroom instruction in response to the new expectations for grade-level learning? 

Agenda

The 2014 Seminar on Teaching Agenda

All events were hosted by Michigan State University at the Detroit Center.

Final agenda with slides linked to the presenter are below. A PDF version of the program is also available.

MONDAY, OCTOBER 20

Noon: Welcome and Lunch